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Publication numberUS1389013 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 30, 1921
Filing dateNov 24, 1920
Priority dateNov 24, 1920
Publication numberUS 1389013 A, US 1389013A, US-A-1389013, US1389013 A, US1389013A
InventorsRobert Schwartz Samuel
Original AssigneeRobert Schwartz Samuel
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mounting lamp-shades
US 1389013 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

s. R. SCHWARTZ;

MOUNTING LAMP SHADES.

APPLICATION FILED NOV. 24 1920. 1,389,013 Patented Aug. 30, 1921,

8. C I," M Q 4 16% w 4 .wu H F MP M E 1- E m G a Arm 4 W 0 M M f Fig.3.

. YUNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

SAKUEL ROBERT SCHWARTZ, 0F NEXV YORK, N. Y.

MOUNTING LAMP-SKADES.

To all whom it may concern.

Be it known that I, SAMUEL ROBERT SCHWARTZ, a citizen of the United States of America, residing at New York, in the county of New York and State of New York, have invented a new and useful Improvementin Mounting Lamp-Shades, of which the following is a specification.

This inventionlrelates to improvements in mounting lamp shades and has for its main object the provision of a simple and attractive structure which will enable ready mounting andremoval of a lamp shade without interfering 1 withfthe: illuminating qualities of the lamp. f

Other and further -objects will appear from the following specification, taken in conjunction with the drawings, in which:

Figure l is a perspective View of an electric desk lamp, and shows my invention appliedthereto.

:Fig. 2 is a detail view of theshade of the lamp shown in Fig. 1 and of my invention applied thereto.

Fig. 3 is'a View of'one end of the shade,

similar to the view of Fig. 2.

Fig. a is'a View of the end of the shade opposite to th e'one' shown in Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a sectional 'view taken on the line 5-5 of Fig. the direction of the arrows. I

Fig. 6 is'a 'det invention.

Fig. 7 is a view of a modified form of shaide which may be used with my invention, an a 5 Fig 8 is a view showing a modification of my invention applied to the shade shown in ail view of apart of my Fig.

' In-Fig.'1 is shown a portable electric desk lamp ofwell' known type,consisti ng of a shade A pivotally supported at two points on a tubular supporting bracket B, and a swivel joint D'connecting the bracket with the base E; The bracket B carries an incandescent lamp socket F of standard type, which carries 'thelamp G. V (See Fig. 5.) Through the "tubular bracket B passes electric wiring H which connectsthe lamp socket F with the source of current.

So far I have described a well-known construction.

providedwith a bushing 2, which is the cus topiary form of construction for modern 'My' invention will next be. described'in detail. The lamp socket F is Specification of Iietters latent. Patented Au g go 1921, Application filed November 24, 1920. Serial No. 426,148.

lamp sockets. In one end of the shade A a slot 1 is provided, the end of which is rounded so as to provide a seat forthe bushing 2,

thus providing a pivotal bearing-when the bushing is slid into the slot. The shade is further provided with a projecting rim 3.

In order to hold the shade A inpivotal engagement with the bushing 2 when the latter is slid into slot 1, I provide a plate 0 'tact'i'ng with bushing 2 "so that it is only capable of pivotal movement about bush;

ingl. I I g The other end. .of theshade .is also piv-' otally mounted 'asfclearly'shown in Figs. 4

and 5. For thispurpose. ahole 8 .is provided in the shade and-in opposed relation.

thereto a hole 9 in thecbracket B." An. ad-

holes and is heldfin place byLwingnut 13. Suitable washers 11 and 12 of felt or other soft material or of resilient material are provided as shown in Fig. 5 for the purpose of protecting the. shade. i f

"In order to remove the shade it is necessary to remove screws 6 from plate C or at least to turn them into such a positionthat they will not prevent removal of the shade from its seatin plate C. Next, the wing-nut 13 is removedand screw 10 is slid out of engagement with the shade. The latter can now be liftedout of its place. and a new shade adjusted on the lamp by performing the above operations in the reverse order.

Itwill be noted thatfthe electric wiring is in nowise disturbed by the removal of the 100 shade. This is a great advantage with this type of shade as the lamp socket isincon venient to reach and wiring it is a tediousoperation.

My invention is particularly useful when 105 the advantageso'fbeing e101? @FFQYB: the 1m justing screw lOpasses freely through these shade without disturbing the wiring will be readily appreciated.

In Figs. 7 and 8 is shown a modification of my invention in whichthe shade is provided with a key-hole shaped opening consisting of a round portion 1 and a slot 1, wide enough to pass over the parts of bracket silient lower bent portion 7 is pivotallyhung from the bushing 2 and carries in threaded engagement therewith two setscrews 6' which may engage the projecting rim 3 of the shade B. The other end of the shade is supported as before.

To remove the shade where this construction is employed, the same is freed at one end by'removal of nut 13 (which ,,as has been stated, is retained in this modification). The screws 6 are then removed or turned to such a position that the. resilient portion 7 of plate C may be removed from engagement with the rim-3 of the shade, which is then slid to the right, as the parts are shown in Fig. 8, so that portions of bracket B pass through the round portion I and slot 1? to effect a complete disengagement of the shade from the lamp.

This modified construction differs from.

the form first described, in that the shade connot be removed. by lifting it away from its seat on bushing 2, as that is made impossible by the narrow slot 1*, but must be slid in the direction of its length, as has been explained. i p 7 It is evident that my construction may have other applications than the one disclosed herewith and it is understood that in my claims I do not limit myself to the exact disclosure of the drawings and specification, but that said claims embrace all equivalents to which I am by law entitled.

I claim: j

v1. In a lamp, a shade provided with a projecting rim, a slotted opening running inward from said rim, a supporting member adapted to pivotally and slidably engage the said opening, and means pivotally supported from said member and adapted to provide a seat for the rim of the shade. i

2. In a lamp, a shade provided with a slotted opening, a supporting member adapted to pivotally and slidably engage said opening, and means on said member adapted to provide a seat for the shade. V

3. In a lamp, a shade provided with a slotted opening, a supporting member adapted to pivotally and slidably engage said opening, means on: said member-adapted to" provide a seat for the shade and locking At the same time, the

means on said first-mentionedmeans. adapted to engage the shade whereby the slidable and pivotal engagement of said opening with said supporting member is changed to pivotal engagement only.

4; In a lamp, a shade having a projecting rim, a slotted opening running inward from said rim, a supporting member 'adapted to pivotally and slidably engage said opening, means pivotally supported from said memher and adapted toprovidei a seat for. the" rim of the shade, and locking, means on said first-mentioned means adapted to engage the shade adjacent the rim whereby the pivotal and slidable engagement of the opening and the supporting member is limited to pivotal engagement only.;.

5. In a lamp, a hade, one end of said shade having a projecting rim, a slotted opening running inward from said rim, a:

hole in the other end of said shade, a supporting member adapted to pivotally and slidably engage said opening, means pivotally supported from saidmember and adapted to provide a seat for the rim of the shade,

and locking, means on said first-mentioned means adapted to engage the shade adjacent the rim, wherebythe pivotal and slidableengagement of the opening and the supporting member is limited to; pivotal engagement only, and means adapted to pivotally engage the hole to provide a pivotal mounting for the other end-of the shade;

6. In a lamp, a shade having a projecting:

rim, a slotted openingrunning inward from said rim, a supporting member adapted to pivotally and slidably engage'said: opening, a plate pivotally supported from said member and having a curved portion adapted to provide aseat for the rim of'the shade, and

adjusting screws in threaded engagement with the plate at a point adjacent the curved portion, and each screw adapted toengage the shade at a. point laterally of the opening and adjacent the rim of the shade, whereby: the pivotal and slidable engagement of the: opening and the member is limited to pivotal engagement on1y.-

7. In a lamp, a shade, one end of said shade having a projecting rim, a slotted opening running inward from sald mm, a hole 1n the other end of said shade, a sup? porting member adapted to pivotally and:

slidably engage said opening, a plate pivotally supported from said member and havmg a curved portion adapted to provide a seat for the rim of the shade, and adjusting.

screws in threaded engagement with the plate at a point adjacent the curved portion, and each screw adapted to engage the shade at a point laterally ofthe opening and adjacent the rim of the shade, whereby the pivotal and,slidableengagement of thevo en-i ing; and the member is limited to-piv'ota en gage ent onlyv and'means to ivotall -em gage the hole so as to rovide a pivotal mounting for the other en of the shade.

8. In a lamp, a shade, one end of said shade having a projecting rim, a slotted opening running inward from said rim, a hole in the other end of said shade, a supporting member adapted to carry an illuminating unit and to pivotally and slidably engage said opening, means pivotally supported from said member and adapted to form a seat for said shade, and adjustable locking means on said pivotally supported means, adapted to engage the shade for the purpose of limiting the pivotal and slidable engagement to pivotal engagement only, and 15 in testimony whereof I have signed my 20 name to this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses, this 23d day of November 1920.

SAMUEL ROBERT SCHWARTZ.

WVitnesses IDA SMITH, AUGUST BOSTROEM.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5183331 *Jul 3, 1991Feb 2, 1993Hubbell IncorporatedCantilevered spoke mounting for lighting fixture
US5260860 *Mar 23, 1992Nov 9, 1993Hubbell IncorporatedExpanding tenon clamp
US5349510 *Mar 23, 1992Sep 20, 1994Hubbell IncorporatedSpring latching mechanism for light fixture
US6089724 *Nov 2, 1998Jul 18, 2000One Tech LlcIndirect task light monitors and the like
US6604842 *Jan 18, 2001Aug 12, 2003Terence Paul GriffithsPicture light
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/269, 362/427, 362/283, 362/280, 362/410
International ClassificationF21S6/00, F21V17/12, F21V17/00
Cooperative ClassificationF21S6/003, F21V17/12
European ClassificationF21S6/00D2, F21V17/12