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Publication numberUS1390020 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 6, 1921
Filing dateNov 7, 1917
Priority dateNov 7, 1917
Publication numberUS 1390020 A, US 1390020A, US-A-1390020, US1390020 A, US1390020A
InventorsWitt Cheney Fred De
Original AssigneeWitt Cheney Fred De
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Intensifier
US 1390020 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. DE w. CHENEY.

INTENSIFIER.

APPLICAHON FILED NOV. 7, 1917.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

Mi li 23 45 1 intensiiie incorporated therein. 1

UNITED STATES FRED DEWITT CHENEY, OF GYPSUM, KANSAS.

mruusrrmn.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Sept. 6, 1921.

Application-filed November 7, 1917. Serial Io. 200,798.

T all whom it may concern:

Be it known thatI, Fnnn DE VVrr'r CHE- NEY, a citizen of the United States, residing which the following is a specification.

.My invention relates to new and useful improvements in intensifiers and has for its primary object the provision of an intensifier for use in ignition systems of internal combustion engines, particularly on motor vehicles for the purpose of intensifying and increasing the electric spark used to create the explosion.

More particularly my intensifier is intended to be connected into the high tension circuit of the ignition system and operates upon the principle of the well-known Leyden-jar, consisting of a plurality of layers of tin foil, alternate layers of which are insulated from each other and electrically connected at their ends.

A further object which I have in view con sists in providing an intensifier of the above character which may be cheaply constructed and which will'occupy but little space.

With these and other objects in view, my invention will be more fully described, illustrated in the accompanying drawings and then specifically pointed out in the claims which form a part of this application.

In the drawings: I

Figure 1 is a perspective view of my imroved intensifier, a portion of the case being broken away to show the internal con struction; I t

Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view taken through the intensifier;

N Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the intensis fier proper removed from its case, the thickness of the various sheets of tin foil andinsulating material being greatly exaggerated;

ig. 4=-is a diagrammatic View of a con: vendonal form of ignition-system with my rCorresponding and like parts are referred to .in the following description and, indical fi lv inall the views of the drawings by; the same reference characters. p i

layers-11 of suitable insulating material,

56 such as oiled paper, a sheet or strip of paper being interposed between each pair of adjacent strips of tin foil. The strips of tin foil are somewhat shorter than the strips of' paper and alternate strips of tin foil project at one end beyond the ends of the other strips and at their other ends terminate flush with the ends of the paper strips. A binding strap 12 of lead or other suitable metal 'connects-the'free ends of one set of straps of tin foil, together with the adjacent ends of the strips of insulating paper, while a similar binding strap 13 connects the free ends of the other series of layers of tin foil and the opposite ends of the strips of paper. These strips of tin foil and oiled paper engage closely against each other and thereforev occupy a relatively small space, although a large number of strips are employed. The binding straps 12 and 13 are provided with inwardly extending spacing lugs 13', the lugs on the binding strap 12 being disposed in staggered relation with respect to the lugs on the binding strap 13, so that when the strips of tin foil and paper are assembled, one end of each strip of tin foil will be seated between a pair of lugs on one binding strap and the other end of each strip of tin' foil willbespaced from the adjacent lug on the other bindingstrap as best shown in Fig. 3 of the drawings. I have found that good results may be obtained by employing ninety-three layers of tin foil, forty-six layers making up one of the groups and being electrically connectedwith one of the binding straps, and forty-sevenlayers making up the other group and being connected 1 to the other binding strap. In the drawings, however, I have made no attempt toillustrate such a lar e number of layers and have shown both the sheets of' tin foil and of paper greatly exaggerated in thickness to insure a clear disclosure, these strips ordinarily being relatively thin. The intensifier. proper, as above described, is sealed inbyzwax 14 or some other suitable insulating material and is inclosed in a'. casing 15 having a'removable back wall 16 which at its ends extendsbeyond the top ,a-ndbottom of,.the casing to receive screws v,17 by .Which the intensifier may .be attached to the. dash or other-suitable artofithevehicle.

'-i Wires ,18, lead r'orn. the bind'ng straps 12 and 13- j a e sec e to ser ws w ch. extend, through opposite. ends, .of the casing andnwh Q -I eeexteri rlyp Prov dw th clamping nuts 20 furnishmg'binding posts "21 and 22.

In order to insure a clear and accurate understanding of my invention I have illustrated diagrammatically a conventional form of wiring system with my intensifier installed. Referring to Fig. 4 I have illustrated a battery 23 as a source of current, a wire 24 leading from one pole of the battery to one terminal of the primary coil 25 of a transformer 26 and a wire 27 leading from the other pole of the battery to the other terminal of the same coil. An engine driven timer 28 is interposed in this latter wire as is customary. v The secondary coil 29 of the transformer is grounded, as indicated at 30, and a wire 31 leads from this secondary coil to one of the binding posts of the intensifier which as a whole is indicated by the numeral 32. A wire 33 leads from the other binding post of the intensifier to the distributer 34 and wires 35 lead from the distributer binding post to spark plugs 36.

The operation of the intensifier will be readily understood. Charging of one group of strips of tin foil sets up an opposite charge upon the strips of the other group and when the first stri s become overcharged the intensifier w1ll discharge, the discharging current from the other group of the strips being very strong and the dis-.

charge being very so that an intense spark is created at the spark plug.

By employing my improved intensifier a more certain, intense and quicker spark is obtained which does away, to a great extent, with ignition difficulties such as carbon, use of more fuel than is necessary, loss of power valve troubles and spark plug troubles. It also, of course makes it easier to start the en ine.

aving thus described the invention,- what is claimed as new is:

1. An intensifier including opposite binding straps having spacing lugs extending toward each other, a plurality of strips of insulatin and conducting material arranged side by side in contact with each other and extending between said binding straps, one end of every other strip of conducting material being seated between two of the lugs on one of the binding straps and the other end of each of said strips of conducting'material alining with and being spaced from the adjacent lug on the other binding strap, whereby the strips of conducting material are in parallel staggered relation.

2. An intensifier including opposite binding straps having inwardly extending spacing lugs, the lugs of, one strap extending toward those of the other and the lugs of one disposed in staggered relation to the lugs of the other, a plurality of strips of insulating and conducting material arranged side by side in contact with each other and extending between said binding straps, one end of every other strip of conducting material being seated between two of the lugs on one binding strap and the other end of each of ing means for attachment to a sup ort and provided with binding posts, opposlte binding straps housed within the casing and having spacing lugs, the lugs of one strap extending toward those of the other and the lugs of one disposed in staggered relation with respect to the lugs of the other, a plurality of strips of insulating and conducting material arranged side by side within the casing and in contact with each other and extending between said binding straps, one end of every other strip of conducting material being seated between two of the lugs of one of the binding straps and the other end of each of said strips of conducting material alining with and being spaced from the adjacent lug on the other binding strap whereby the strips of conducting material are in parallel staggered relation, conductors connecting the binding straps with the bindin posts, and an insulating jacket housed wit in the casing and entirely surrounding the assembled strips and binding straps.

4. An intensifier including a casing having means for attachment to a support,'binding posts extending from the top and botbeing seated between two of the lugs on one .of the binding straps and the other end of each of said strips of tin foil alining with and being space from the adjacent lug on the other binding strap whereby the strips of tin foil are in parallel staggered relation, a seal of insulating wax arranged within the casing and entirely surrounding the assembled strips and binding straps, and conductors connected with the bindin straps and extending through the insulating wax for attachment to the binding posts.

In testimon whereof I afiix m signature.

FRED D WITT CHENE [L. s.]

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2587847 *Jun 22, 1949Mar 4, 1952Kiekhaefer CorporationIgnition system for internal
US4271454 *Mar 5, 1979Jun 2, 1981Draloric Electronic GmbhCapacitor of disk shape with liquid cooling
Classifications
U.S. Classification361/301.4, 361/306.1, 361/314, 123/620, 123/154, 123/653
International ClassificationH01G4/30
Cooperative ClassificationH01G4/30
European ClassificationH01G4/30