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Publication numberUS1390617 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 13, 1921
Filing dateMay 10, 1917
Priority dateMay 10, 1917
Publication numberUS 1390617 A, US 1390617A, US-A-1390617, US1390617 A, US1390617A
InventorsJay Webb
Original AssigneeJay Webb
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Suction-actuated pumping device
US 1390617 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

w. JAY.

SUCIION ACTUATED PUMPING DEVICE.

APPLICATION FILED MAYIO, 1917.

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SUCTION ACTUATED PUMPING DEVICE.

APPLICATION FILED MAYIO, 19w.

1,390,61? Pammdse t; 13,1921.

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SUQTION ACTUATED PUMPING DEVICE. APPLICATION FILED MAYIO, I917. 1,390,617, PawmedSept. 13, 1921;,

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SUCTION-AGTUATED PUMPING DEVICE. v

Specification of Letters Patent. Patented Sept, 13, 1921.

(lontinuationjn part of application Serial No. 89,524, filed April 7, 1916. This application filed May 10, 1917. Serial No. 167,638.

To all whom it may concern:

Be known that I, WEBB JAY, a citizen-0fthe United States, residing at Chicago, in the county of Cook and, State of Illinois, have invented new" and useful Improve ments in Suction-Actuated Pumping Devices, of which the following is a specification, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part thereof.

The application is a continuation of my previous application, Serial No. 89,524, filed April 7th, 1916, and allowed October 5th, 1916. The purpose of the invention herein shown is similar to that of my pending application, Serial No. 868,580, filed October 26th, 1914, namely, in general, to provide means for transferring liquid (such as liquid fuel for use in an internal combustion engine) from a low level supply tank to an elevated receptacle or reservoir from which it may flow by gravity to the point of use,

The invention consists in the features and elements of construction described and shown in the drawings as indicated in the claims.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a diagrammatic view of the nature of a side elevation, showing in dotted outline a portion of an internal combustion engine' of an automobile, and associated therewith the various parts and elements of the present invention.

Fig. 2 is an axial section of the pumping device which embodies this invention in one of its forms.

Fig. 3 is a similar view of a modified form of the pumping device,

Fig. 4 is a vertical axial 'sectionbroken away to condense the view of the auxiliary reservoir which may be sup lied by this pumping device in one of its orms.

Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 2, showing a further modification. r e I Fig. 6 is an axial section of the auxiliary reservoir in a different form from that shown in Fig. 4.

Fig. 7 is a section at the line 77, 'on

Fig. 2.

Briefly, the pumping device in the form inwhich it is shown comprises a suction-operated piston and a liquid-pumping piston,

mechanically connected together for actuation of the latter by the former. It may be understood that when the device is used in connection with an internal combustion en-' 1 in which .the suction-operated piston, B, is

' ling valve,

gine, the source of suction may be the intake manifold of the engine from which any suitable pipe or conduit may connect with a suction port, A in the suction chamber, A,

disposed. In addition to the suction port, A the chamber, A, has an air inlet port, A'. In all the forms illustrated, means is provided for alternating the dominance of the suction and the atmospheric pressure operating throughv the ports, A and A4, respectively. In the form shown in Fig. 2, this means consistsin making the air inlet port quite large relatively to'the suction port and pI0V1d1I1g-a valve to control said air inlet port operated by the movement of the piston. In the form shown in Fig: 3 the means for this purpose consists in providing sep- J to the air inletport and providing a valve forcontrolling the suction port operated by the movement of the piston. In the form..

2' the atmosphere-port-controlis carried by a stem, D which plays in an axial cavity or pocket in the piston, B, being guided somewhat loosely in the collar or bushing, 6 at 'the. entrance of. said pocket; and the upper end of said stem, D is pivotally connected to the end of the approximatel horizontal arm, E of a bell crank lever, E, which is fulcrumed at its angle on a bracket, F, mounted in fixed position on the cylinder; a spring, .G, being, grovided connected to the eiid of the arm,

, of the bell crank lever, and stressed back shown in Fi past the fulcrum of the lever to a fastening point at f on the bracket, ,F. The position of the valve, D, when the bell crank lever 101) tion of the valve-stem, D with'the lever'105 arm, E is slotted as shown, at d, to permit the valveja certain range of-movement Wltllrange of movement without moving the valve; and the 'stem,-D of the valve is 110 out moving the lever, and the lever a certain 80 port relatively quite large with comparison threaded below the port, A and carries on its threaded portion two nuts, 03 and 03 respectively above and below the guide collar, 6 which nuts may be adjusted to engage the guide collar at predetermined limits of the movement of the piston in the cylinder, for causing' the piston in said movements to start the movement of the valve either toward or away from the seat as the case may be, the movement being finished in either direction by the reaction of the spring, Gr, after the bell crank lever, E E has been rocked by the positive actuation of the piston to carry the line of stress of the spring past the fulcrum of the lever; thus giving what is commonly known as a snap action to the valve both in seating and unse'ating. The slotted connection of the lever to the valve stem at d permits the lever to complete its movement in either direction after giving the valve by the reaction of the spring, G, its proper movement in either direction.

It will be observed that the piston, B, is actuated in opposition to the suction by a spring, II; For compactness in the structure the piston is provided with an annular pocket, B which receives one end of the spring, H, and the head of the cylinder is provided with a corresponding annular pocket, A, which receives the remainder of the spring H. The central portion of the head encompassed by the annular pocket, A is chambered out to accommodate the valve, D, and its operating and guiding connections comprising the bell crank lever, spring, etc. It is desirable'to protect this central pocket from the accumulation of extraneous matter which might impede the action, and for that purpose. there is provided a cap or plug, A which is margin' ally apertured at a to afford free atmos- 1 pheric communication into the pocket andwhen the valve, D, is open-through the port, A into the cylinder chamber, A. It will be noticed that the under side of the piston, B, is at all times exposed to atmospheric pressure, which has access through a port, 7, between said piston, B, and the smaller piston, K. Said piston, K, is carried on the end of thestem, K which connects the two pistons rigidly, and it plays in the smaller cylinder, which communicates,-

'or but for the piston, K, would communicate,-with the lower end of the cylinder chamber A, in which the piston, B, reciprocates. 'Ihe lower end of said cylinder, L, is shown connected with the stem of a T- fitting, M, which is an element in a pipe line, Q, leading from the low tank, P, to the carbureter, Q, and interme'diately to the auxiliary reservoir, R. Check valves, M and M in this T-fitting at opposite sides of the stem open for flow of liquid from the low level tank, I, toward the carbureter and auxiliary reservoir, It, and seat in'the oppo mospheric pressure is attained by providing each of these ports with a valve, the valve, T, controlling the atmosphere inlet port, and the valve, U, controlling the suction port, each being positioned at the proper side of its seat to be held ontothe seat more or less by the suction or partial vacuum operating above the piston-in the larger of the two piston chambers. Both valves are operatively connected with the same arm of a lever, E fulcrumed at e on a bracket depending from the top of the chamber, the

spring G, being stressed from the remote end of the lever arm which engages the valve past the fulcrum of the lever to a fixed engaging point, e, on the bracket, F and operating, as in the previously described form, for giving snap action to the valve,

that is, completing its movement in either direction after the movement has been ini tiated by the piston approaching the limit of its stroke in one direction or the other. In this form the spring, H, is partly accom modated in the annular pocket, 13, of the piston.

In the form shown in Fig. 5 to minimize friction the piston, B, is loosely fitted to the chamber, A, and the lower end of its flange orskirt, B is kept constantly submerged in liquid, such as a thick lubricating oil indicated at X, and carried in an annular trough, A formed at the lower end of the chamber, A. 'In this form the springs which resist the suction-caused movement of the piston are disposed for being'stretched by that movement instead of being compressed as in the other form; and for compactness of structure in view of this modification, the piston is chambered on under side and the cylinder is provided with an annular partition, I extending up into the cyl partition, being attached at their lower ends thereto at hooks, L As a matter of prac-. "tical convenience, this partition, I is formed as a continuation of the smaller cyL inder, L. In this form the free admission of atmosphere behind the piston,that is, on the opposite side from that at which it is exposed to the suct1on,is obtained and K, respectively, the check valves in this form being illustrated as balls,- 70

and is.

In conjunction with any oneof the three forms of pumping devices shown, the auxiliary chamber to be supplied thereby may be of either of the forms shown in Fig. 4: and Fig. 6 respectively. In Fig. 4 the reservoir, R, having its inlet for the liquid through the pipe, 0 at the bottom has the air inlet at R at the top where there is desirably connected a return bend, R which tends to prevent the entrance of dust and dirt which might choke the vent and gives a'preferably downward discharge for any vapor or oil that may under certain possible circumstances be discharged in case of leakage of the 'air valve upon flooding of the chamber. In this form the valve, W, for controlling the air inlet-is connected by its stem, W to the float, Z, the connection being efiected by an eye, Z on the,fl,oat engaging the stem'of the valve between two stops, 'w and 'w thereon, the distance between the stops providing for a certain deflnite range of movement of the float without actuation of the valve. The valve stem has a guide, W which also furnishes a stop at W, to limit the opening movement ofv the valve within convenient range. It will be seen that in this form the reservoir will be filled by any excess of liquid-pumped beyond what is necessary to supply the carbureter,

- and that the valve, W, will be closed by the O, the liquid flowing over from the top of this tube, 0 to fill the reservoir. A valve, Z is provided for closing the upper end of this tube. The valve would obviously be opened by the rise of the liquid in the tube to the point of overflow unless. it is held positively seated; andfor so seating it positively after the reservoir is filled to a predetermined limit, the valve is carried by a jointed link, comprising the member, Z., and a bell crank member, Z*, the up standing arm, Z, of said bell crank lever-being the element of thejointed link, and the other arm being extended ofl horizontally and connected to the stem, Z of the float, Z The weight of the float, when not buoyed by the liquid in the reservoir, holds the bell crank lever and the link element, Z at the position shown in dotted line, keeping the valve unseated and permitting free inflow of the liquid. As the liquid rises, eventually the float is buoyed up and lifts the lever to the position shown in full line at which the .two link elements are'alined and the valve is positively seated. In order to cause this action for seatingand the action for unseating to be instantaneous, there is provided a I spring stop, 2, having an angle-shaped abutment at 2 whose two slopes are encountered by the end of the lever arm in the upward and downward movements respectively, the

and fully closed position, and upon passing the apex the reaction of the spring forces the lever to the limit of its movement in one direction or the other,that is, 'for closing the valve when the float is rising and lifting the lever, and for opening it widely when the float is falling. A stop screw, 2;, set into a boss at the top of the reservoir pro: jecting down over the end of the lever may be adjusted to cause the lever to come to the proper position for seating the valve and not be thrown beyond that position when-it passes the apex of the spring in the rising movement of the float. In this form it will be seen that the inflow of theliqui'd is positively arrested when the valve is seated by the rising of the float, whereas, in the form shownin Fig. 4;, the inflow may continue as long as the force of the pump is sufficient to force the liquid in against the resistance of the imprisoned and resultantly compressed air above the liquid in the reservoir. But in either form the possibility of overflow is defeated by the action of the float controlling the atmosphere inlet valve or the liquid inp let valve.

I claim 1. In combination, a large cylinder and a small cylinder; a large piston and'a small piston rigidly connected together and op-' erating in said cylinders respectively, the

large cylinder having at the same side of the and valve-controlled inlet and discharge passages for the small cylinder.

2. In combination, a large cylinder and a small cylinder; a large piston and a small 'piston rigidly connected together and operating in said'cylinders respectively, the large cylinder having at the same side of the piston therein, two independent ports, one for atmosphere inlet and the other for suction connection, one of said ports being relatively small and the other relatively large; a valve operated by the piston controlling the larger of said ports for alternating-the dominance of the suction and atmospheric pressure operating through said ports respectively by the back-and forth movement of the piston;

and valve controlled inlet and discharge passages for the small cylinder.

said ports respectively,.and valve-controlled inlet and discharge passages for the small cylinder.

In combination, a large cylinder and a small cylinder; a large piston and a small piston rigidly connected together and operating in said cylinders respectively; a spring which resists the movement of said rigidlyconnected pistons in one direction and reacts for theirmovement in the opposite direction, the large cylinder having at the same side of the piston therein, two independent ports, one for atmosphere inlet and the other for suction connection, and means operated by the back-and-forth movement of the pistons for alternating the dominance of the suction and atmospheric pressure operating through said ports respectively, and valvecontrolled inlet and discharge passages for the small cylinder.

5. In combination, a large cylinder and a small cylinder; a large pistonand a small piston rigidly connected together and operating in said cylinders respectively; a spring which yieldingly resists the movement of said pistons in one direction and reacts for moving them in the opposite direction, the large cylinder having a suction port and an atmosphere inlet port at the same side of the piston therein, one of said ports being large relatively to the other, a valve controlling said larger port, means by which the movement of the piston in opposite directions operates said valve for opening and closing to alternate the dominance of the suction and atmospheric pressure through said ports respectively, and valve-controlled inlet anddischarge passages for the small 7 through saidports, for reciprocating the pistons; a spring operating on the piston to resist the suction-caused movement and re- ;tracting it in the opposite direction; and

cylinder having at the same side of the piston therein, two independent ports, one for atmosphere inlet and the other for suction connection, means operated by the move ment of the Piston for alternating the dominance of the suction and the atmospheric pressure through said ports respectively, and H a spring operating on the piston in opposition to the suction-caused movement of the piston, the piston being chambered to accommodate a portion of the length of the spring.

8. In a liquid-feeding apparatus in combination with a .low level supply tank and pumping means connected therewith, an elevated auxiliary tank into which said pumping means discharges, an inlet opening in said tank, a valve controlling the same, a fulcrum positioned opposite said inlet opening, a jointed link connecting the valve with.

saidfulcrum and dimensioned to hold said valve in closed position when the pivot at the joint of said link is alined with the fulcrum pivot and said valve, and a float in said auxiliary tank connected to said jointed link and adapted to straighten it for closing the valve when the liquid reaches a predetermined level in the tank.

9. In combination a large and a small cylinder; a large piston and a small piston rigidly connected together and operating in said cylinders respectively; valve-controlled inlet and discharge. passages for the small cylinder, the large cylinder having a suction port and an air inlet port which is large relatively to the suction port, said two ports being at the same side of the piston in said cylinder; a valve controlling the air inlet port and connections by which the piston operates said valve for opening it at the limit of the suction 'causedby the stroke of the piston.

10. In combination, a large cylinder and a small cylinder; :1 large piston and a small piston rigidly connected together and operating in said cylinders respectively; valvecontrolled inlet and discharge passages for connected with the valve; a spring connected to one end of the lever and stressed past the lever fulcrum, whereby it tends to throw the valve to either limit upon being moved away from the opposite limit a certain distance, the piston being connected with the valve for initiating its movement with play at the connection for permitting the completion of the movement by the action of the spring. A

11. In combination, 'a large cylinder, and a small cylinder, a large piston and a small piston rigidly connected together and operating in said cylinders respectively; valvecontrolled inlet and dischargepassages for the small cylinder, the large cylinder having at the same side of the piston therein a suction port and an air inlet port larger than the suction port; a valve controlling said larger port; a spring which yieldingly resists the movement of the piston in opposition to the suction and reacts from moving it in the opposite direction, the head of the cylinder having an annular recess to accommodate the spring, and a central outwardlyopen chamber encompassed by said annular IGCGSSythG valve and operating connections therefor being located in said. central out wardly-open chamber.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set In hand at Chicago, Illinois, this 8th day of WEBB AY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2684632 *Jan 14, 1950Jul 27, 1954Trico Products CorpWindshield washer pump
US2722455 *Jan 11, 1951Nov 1, 1955Trico Products CorpWindshield washer
US2746652 *Dec 3, 1952May 22, 1956Trico Products CorpWindshield washer
US2833219 *Aug 18, 1954May 6, 1958Lewis George WHydraulic converter
US3131639 *Aug 9, 1963May 5, 1964Lisle CorpPump structure
US3162132 *Mar 15, 1963Dec 22, 1964Technicon InstrPump
US5542918 *Jan 6, 1995Aug 6, 1996Zimmer, Inc.Vacuum driven fluid pump for an aspiration/irrigation instrument
US5554011 *Oct 27, 1994Sep 10, 1996Symbiosis CorporationMedical fluid pump powered by a constant source of vacuum
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/445, 91/347, 92/152, 91/273, 91/52, 184/29, 123/25.00L, 417/401, 91/342, 261/DIG.370, 92/135
International ClassificationF02B1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02B1/00, Y10S261/37, F02M2700/4388
European ClassificationF02B1/00