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Publication numberUS1393213 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 11, 1921
Filing dateJan 4, 1919
Priority dateJan 4, 1919
Publication numberUS 1393213 A, US 1393213A, US-A-1393213, US1393213 A, US1393213A
InventorsAlfred Gilbert
Original AssigneeAlfred Gilbert
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Post-card
US 1393213 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. GILBERT.

POST CARD.

APPLICATION FILED JANA, 1919.

1,393,213. Patented Oct. 11,1921.

POST CARD. U

Irwinrom Y ALFRED G \usz'vvr ATTORNEY PATENT OFFICE.

ALFRED GILBERT, OF BIRMINGKAM, ENGLAND.

POST-CARD.

Application filed January 4, 1919.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Oct. 11, 1921.

Serial No. 269,677.

(GRANTED UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF THE ACT OF MARCH 3, 1821, 41 STAT. L., 1313.)

provement in Post-Cards, for which I have filed an application in Great Britain, January 22, 1914, Patent No. 1723, sealed November 2 L, 191 i; and I do hereby declare the following to be a full,clcar, and exact description of the same This invention relates to an improved post card and has for its object to provide a card especially adapted'for use when a carbon copy is required to be made.

According to my invention I provide a post card comprising the post card proper adapted to have both address and message written or typed each upon one half of the same side of the sheet, which may be subsequently folded across its center and stuck, and a duplicate sheet detachably fastened to the ct p e thereof whereby a complete carbon copy may be kept of the hole of the matter written upon the post card including the address and message at one insertion in the typewriter. For the carbon copy I preferably use a fold of the same paper that forms the card, this fold being detachable from the card across a line of perforations and being of the size of the unfolded card, thus recording both address and message upon the same side and being of convenientsize for filing; or a thin sheet of paper might be secured along' one edge at the hack of the post card sheet.

In the annexed drawing:

Figure 1 shows a complete card, duplicate sheet and detachable slip formed of a single sheet. 7

Fig. 2 shows the same folded down and with a carbon sheet in position as for typing.

Fig. 3 shows the card proper, folded ready to be stuck together.

In carrying my invention into practice as illustrated upon the accompanying drawings I employ a piece of paper of the same width as and of approximately four times the height of the post card folded ready for the post. A horizontal line of perforations 1 across the center of the paper'divides the post card proper from the duplicate sheet 2-,

which is folded down as shown in Fig. 2 and is adapted to be torn off at this point.

Beneath this line of perforations 1 is the front 3 of the post card or'part upon which the address is to be written, and this is preferably separated from the back ft or part upon which the message is to be writ ten by a second row of perforations 5 or other means to make the subsequent folding more easy.

Beneath the back I may dispose another row of perforations 6 and a short detacln able slip 7. This is not essential but is convenient as in this way the whole of the back is made available for typewritten matter from the very top to the very bottom, the front of the card and the detachable slip affording the necessary holding surface to the machine.

Upon the reverse side of the paper either the front or back of the card or preferably both are covered with gum or the like. T he reverse side of the back 4 is shown in Fig. 3 as covered with adhesive 9.

In use a carbon sheet 8 is placed between the postcard and the duplicate sheet and they are inserted together into the typewriter. The address is then written upon the front of the post card and the mesfollows upon the back. Upon removal from the machine the duplicate sheet (with address, date and message allon one side in very much the form of a, letter) and small detachable slip are detached; the gum upon the reverse side of the front and back is moistened and the post card folded and stuck together with the address upon one side and the message upon the other in the usual way, the resultant post card being thus of uniform thickness,composed of two layers uniformly stuck together over the whole area of the card.

It will be seen that in this manner only one half of the thickness of the complete post card has to be penetrated in order to give a duplicate, enabling the original typing to be done upon the post card and a carbon copy to be obtained from the same without ditliculty. Moreover, the card has only to be placed in the machine once in order to write the address and message upon both the post card and duplicate sheet, and the fact that the duplicate sheet is attached facilitates the arrangement in the machine and holds the carbon paper in position.

if desired the inside surface of the post card portion may be carbonized in addition to being gummed to obviate the use of a separate piece of carbon paper.

Vlhat I claim is r I 1. A post card comprismga rectangular sheetv of material of about half the usual thickness to allow 01 the taking of a carbon copy of written or typewritten matter thereon the sheet bein dividedinto at least three area of the other two portions, the latter of @whlch are substantially equal to each other in area, thelarger portion being blank while the front of one of the smaller portions is marked to indicate that'it is the front 025 a post card, and the back or at least one of the smaller portions is entirely covered with adhesive, whereby a carbon copy of the address and message written on the smaller portions can be obtained upon the larger portion and the two smaller portions can be secured together back to back to form a, post card of the usual thickness.

'2. A. post card comprising a rectangular sheet of material of about half the usual thickness to allow of the taking of a carbon copy of written or typewritten matter there on, the sheet being divided into at least three portions by two parallel division lines which pass across the sheet'parallel to its shorter sides along which lines the material is weakened, one of the end portions being of an area approximately equal to the combined area oft the other two portions, the latter of which are substantially equal to each other in area. the lar er oortion beinp blankb l a while the front of one of the smaller portions is marked to indicate that it is the front of a post card, and the back of at least one of the smaller portions is entirely covered with adhesive, whereby a carboncopy oi the address and message written on the smaller portions. can be obtained upon the larger portion and the two smaller portions can be secured together back to back to :torm' a post card of the usual'thiclmess.

', 3. A post card comprising a rectangular Ctill sheet of material ot'about half the usual thickness to allow of the taking of a carbon copy of i' vritten or typewritten matter thereon, the sheet being divided into at least three portions by two parallel division lines, which pass across the sheet parallel to its shorter sides, one of the end portions being of an area approximately equal to the c0mbined area off the other two portions, the latter of which are substantially equal to each other in area, the larger portion being' blank whil the front of one of too smaller e. A post cardcomprising a rectangular sheet oi material of about half the usual thickness to allow or the takingoii a carbon copy '01": written or typewritten matter thereon, the sheet being divided into at leastthree portions by two parallel division lines, which pass across the sheet parallel to'its shorter sides, along which lines the material is weakened, one of the end portionsbeing Oif illl area proximately equal to the combined area of the cthertwo portions, the latter of which are substantially equal to each other in area, the larger portion being blank while the tront of one or the smaller portions is marked to indicate that it is the front at a post card, and the back of at least one ofthe smaller portions is entirely covered with adhesive, whereby a carbon copy of the address and message writt n on the smaller portions obtained upon the larger portion and the two smaller portions can be secured together back to backto form a. post card of the usual thickness. and detachable slip at the edge of one of the smaller portions to provide a holding surface for a typewriter. in testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification.

ALFRED oitnnnr.

to form 9 suri'ace for a

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3204987 *Aug 29, 1963Sep 7, 1965David L FannStationery item for use primarily with postal cards
US3931426 *Jul 11, 1974Jan 6, 1976Philip N. BraunMarking tape assembly
US4084015 *May 12, 1976Apr 11, 1978Patterson Michael PCage ornament and card
US4087576 *May 12, 1976May 2, 1978Patterson Michael PGreeting card and ornament
US6161316 *Jun 20, 1997Dec 19, 2000Bolon; Judith A.Invisilog
US6418649Jul 31, 2000Jul 16, 2002Judith BolonSystem for the inscription and secure recordation of information
Classifications
U.S. Classification462/68, 428/43
International ClassificationB41L1/22, B41L1/00, B42D15/08
Cooperative ClassificationB42D15/08, B41L1/22
European ClassificationB42D15/08, B41L1/22