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Publication numberUS1394270 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 18, 1921
Filing dateMay 18, 1920
Priority dateMay 13, 1919
Also published asDE346830C
Publication numberUS 1394270 A, US 1394270A, US-A-1394270, US1394270 A, US1394270A
InventorsBrandenberger Jaques Edwin
Original AssigneeBrandenberger Jaques Edwin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Artificial textile fabric and the process for its manufacture
US 1394270 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

a I. E. BRANDENBERGER. ARTIFICIAL TEXTILE FABRIC AND THE PROCESS FOR ITS MANUFACTURE.

APPLICATION FILED MAYIB, 19 20.

1,394,270. Patented Oct. 18, 1921..

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UNITED ZSTATES PATENT OFFICE.

J'AQUES EDWIN BRANDENBERGEE, OF NEUILLY-SUR-SEINE, FRANCE.

ARTIFICIAL TEXTILE ,FALBEIG AND THE PROCESS FOR ITS MANUFACTURE.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, JA UEs EDWIN BRAN- DENBERGER, citizen of the Republic of Switzerland, and resident of Neuilly-sur-Seine, Seine, France, (post-oilice address 2 Rue A Amiral de Joinv1lle,) have invented a new and useful Artificial Textile Fabric and the collodion, gelatin, cellulose acetate and the.

like; but in all such cases the threads have been solid, and the fabricsthemselves are heavy. transparent and cold to the touch. According to this invention, however, the threads, instead of being solid, are more or less hollow, due to the presence therein of a series of minute bubbles of-air, or some other gaseous fluid which is inert to the cellulose or other viscous solution, arranged side by side; and as the result of the emi ployment of these threads, the fabrics constructed therefrom are very light, opaque and warm to the touch. These characteristic properties may, moreover, be modified as to their degree of'intensity by regulating the quantity of bubbles introduced into the threads and, hence, into the fabric, so that it is possible to obtain, for example, a textile fabric having absolutely the" same appearance and feel as wool.

heintroduction of the bubbles of air or other gaseous fluid into the viscous solution may be effected in any suitable manner; for instance, by injecting the air or gas directly into the solution, by beating up the solution, by the use of emulsifying apparatus, etc., etc. The emulsion thus obtained is sufficiently permanent to render possible the manufacture of the threads by means of the drawplates or spinning heads usually employed in the manufacture of artificial silk; but if deemed necessary. or desirable, the permanence of the emulsion may be increased by adding to the substances'employed other substances such as soap, albumen, ,gelatin, etc.

The accompanying drawing illustrates Specification of Letters Patent.

Application filed May 18,

Patented Oct. 18, 1921. 1920. Serial No. 882,375

certain forms which the invention may take in practice, as distinguished from the usual form of thread, and various ways in which it'may be obtained; but itis to be understood that such showing is given merely by way of example, and imposes no limitation on the invention itself.

In said drawing:

Figure l is a side elevation of the ordinary form of thread.

ig. 2 is a side elevation, partly in longitudinal section, of a thread constructed in accordance with the invention.

Fig. 3 is a vertical cross-section of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a longitudinal section of athread of viscose containing a succession of bubbles.

Fig. 5 is asimilar view of a thread in which the different bubbles unite in formin a continuous bore.

Fig. 6 is a vertical sectional view, more or less diagrammatic in character, of one form of apparatus for producing the emulslon.

' Fig. 7 is a diagrammatic side elevation of a spinning or thread-forming device which may be utilized in conjunction with the apparatus represented in Fig. 6.

Fig. 8 is a diagrammatic sectional view of another form of emulsifying apparatus.

Referring more particularly to the drawing, the usual form of filament or thread is represented, on a greatly enlargedscale, in Fig. 1, as previously stated, such filament being solid throughout. In contradistinction thereto, the improved form of thread contains a series .of bubbles a of air or other inert gaseous fluid such as oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, etc, which are disposed side by side within the thread, as indicated in Figs. 2 and 4; the presence of the bubbles being due to the introduction of the gaseous fluid into the viscous solution and the reten- 7 tion of particles of the. fluid in the subsequently formed emulsion. Under'ordinary conditions, these bubbles will be toosmall to possess an internal tension sufficient to enable them to. swell out the thread, but will be of relatively minute size and will be spaced slightly from each other in the manner indicated in Fig. 4; although if the quantity of air or gas contained in the after having been formed, to stand for a e While in order to permit the large bubbles preferably viscose and which is whipped up or agitated to effect its aeration by means of a sultable beater 0 driven in any desired manner, the lower portion only of the beater being submerged in the viscose. Any other form of emulsifying apparatus may be used, however; for instance that illustrated in r Fig. 8, in which the air or gas is injected into the viscous solutioni through a .nozzle h which directs it against the adjacent wall is of the receptacle. The latter is provided With two oppositely-extending outlet arms or branches through which the emulsion is discharged.

In either case, the emulsion, after its formation, and after it has stood for a while to permit the large bubbles to rise and break, is delivered in some suitable manner to the drawing or spinning plate or head 6 (Fig. 7); the filaments f discharged through the perforations in said plate or head being twisted together 'to form the final thread or filament,

While the invention has been described above in connection with the formation of continuous filaments or threads, it is to be understood that it is equally applicable to the production of short hairs or threads for power spinning; and that it can also be utilizedin the manufacture of films, plates, bands, etc. In any event, the product, whatever its form, can be subjected to the action of'dyeing baths in the same way as the ordinary filaments.

I claimasmy invention J J 1. The herein-described process, comprising the steps of emulsifying a viscous solution and a gaseous fluid which is inert to said 7 solution, and expressing the resultant emulsion through a drawing plate to produce an article containing an internal series of bubbles of said fluid.-

2. The herein-described process, comprising ithe steps of simultaneouslyforming a plurality of continuous filaments, each. of which is partly hollow; and thereupon twisting the several filaments together to form a single thread. i

3. Theherein-described process, comprising the steps of simultaneously forming a plurality of continuous filaments, each of which has an internal series of bubbles containlng a gaseous fluid which is inert to the substance of which the filament is formed; and thereupbntwistingthe several filaments .together tOllgifOIfIIl a single. thread."

ing a series of minute air interior.

bubbles of a filaments being partly hollow.

4:. The herein-described process, comprising the steps of emulsifying a viscous solution and a gaseous fluid which is inert to said solution; expressing the resultant emulsion through a drawing plate to simultaneously form a plurality of filaments, each of which contains an internal series of bubemulsion through a drawing plate to simultaneously form a plurality of filaments, each containing an internal series of minute bubbles of said fluid; and thereupon twisting the several filaments together to form a single thread.

6. The herein-described process, comprising the steps of emulsifying a viscoussolution and a gaseous fiuid which is'inert to said solution; allowing the resultant emulsion to stand after its formation has been completed, so as to permit the large bubbles of gaseous fluid to rise to the surfa e of the emulsion and escape; and expressi g said solution through a drawing plate to produce an article containing an internal series of minute bubbles of said fluid.

7. As a new article of manufacture, a

thread or, filament composed of a viscous 3 substance having within its interior a series of bubbles of a gaseous fluid which is inert to the viscous substance.

8. As a new article of manufacture, a thread or filamentcomposed of viscose havbubbles within its 9. As a new article of manufacture, a thread or filament composed of viscose having within its interior a series of minute v gaseous fluid which is inert to viscose.

10. An article of the character described, comprising a body portion formed of a solidified viscous substance containing within its-interior a series of minute bubbles of .a gaseous fluid which is inert-to the viscous. substance, said bubbles being arranged side by side. I

11. As a new article of manufacture, an artificial silk thread which is partly hollow.

12. As a new article of manufacture, an artificial silk thread containing an internal series of bubbles of gaseous fluid.

13'. -As a new article of manufacture, an artificial silk rthlreadl comprlsing a series of filaments twisted together, eachv of said 14. As a new article of manufacture, an artificial silk thread comprising a series of filaments twisted together, each of said filaments containing an internal series ofbubi bles of gaseous fluid.

15. The herein-described process, comprising the steps of emulsifying a viscous solution and a gaseous fluid which is inert to the viscous solution; and then expressing the emulsion through a drawing plate to form a filament wherein a series of bubbles of said fluid are entrained.

16. The herein-described process, comprising the steps of emulsifying a viscous 3 solution and a gaseous fluid which is inert to the viscous solution; allowing the resultant emulsion to stand after its formation has been completed, so as to permit the large bubbles of gaseous fluid to rise to the surface of the emulsion and escape; and then expressing the emulsionthrough a drawing plate to form a filament wherein a series of bubbles of said fluid are entrained.

' In testimony whereof I have signed this specification in the presence of a subscribing ,witness.

JAQUES EDWIN BRANDENBERGER.

Witness ABHoUsE NICOLAS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2501833 *Dec 3, 1943Mar 28, 1950American Viscose CorpMethod and apparatus for the production of hollow bodies
US2612679 *Aug 21, 1951Oct 7, 1952Ladisch Rolf KarlFilaments containing fillers
US3225125 *Aug 28, 1962Dec 21, 1965Fmc CorpMethod of forming regenerated cellulose fibers
US3298895 *Dec 17, 1962Jan 17, 1967Du PontProcess for producing images and products thereof
US3315454 *Mar 9, 1964Apr 25, 1967William L CarranzaSynthetic baling and tying twines
US3949031 *Aug 9, 1973Apr 6, 1976Fmc CorporationMethod for making cellular articles
US4332752 *Oct 1, 1979Jun 1, 1982Akzo N.V.Process for production of dialysis membrane hollow fiber chains
US6846562Aug 6, 2003Jan 25, 2005Milliken & CompanyMethod of forming light dispersing fiber and fiber formed thereby
US7118696Jun 8, 2004Oct 10, 2006Milliken & CompanyMethod of forming light dispersing fiber and fiber formed thereby
DE1195428B *Apr 27, 1957Jun 24, 1965Felix SchleuterVerfahren zur Herstellung von Fasern oder faserigem Gut, insbesondere fuer textile Zwecke
DE1269765B *Mar 4, 1959Jun 6, 1968Du PontVerfahren zur Herstellung von Faeden oder Filmen mit Glanzeffekten aus synthetischemorganischem Material
Classifications
U.S. Classification57/248, 425/67, 264/103, 264/167, 428/398, 264/54, 106/122
International ClassificationD01D5/247, D01D5/24
Cooperative ClassificationD01D5/24, D01D5/247
European ClassificationD01D5/247, D01D5/24