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Publication numberUS1395431 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 1, 1921
Filing dateJan 21, 1920
Priority dateJan 21, 1920
Publication numberUS 1395431 A, US 1395431A, US-A-1395431, US1395431 A, US1395431A
InventorsKresky Jesse E
Original AssigneeKresky Jesse E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Brooder-stove
US 1395431 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. E. KRESKY.

BRODDER STOVE.

APPLICATION FILED JAN-2|, 192p.

Patented Nov. 1, 1921.

INVENTOR 1.1. E. (IPA-5 K/ UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

BROODER-STOVE.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Nov. 1, 1921.

Application filed January 21, 1920. Serial No. 352,974.

T o allwhom it may canoe m:

Be it known that I, Jnssn E. 'Knnsnr, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Petaluma, Sonoma county, State of California, have invented a certain new and useful Brooder-Stove, of Which the following is a specification.

The invention relates to brooder stoves for installation in brooder rooms.

An object of the invention is to provide a brooderstove which insures proper ventilation of the room.

Another object of the invention is to provide a brooder stove whichintroduces warm fresh air into the room without producing drafts among the chicks.

A further object of the invention is to provide a brooder stove which introduces warm fresh air of substantially constant temperature regardless of atmospheric temperature.

A further object of the invention is to provide a brooder stove which introduces warm fresh air at a plurality of levels'so that the chicks are kept warm and at the same time, the room is properly ventilated.

The invention possesses other advantageous features, some of which, with the fore- .going will be set forth at length in the following description, where I shall outline in full that form of the invention which I have selected for illustration in the drawings accompanying and forming part of the present specification. In said drawings-I have shown one form of brooder stove of my invention, but it is to be understood that I do not limit myself to such form, since the invention, as expressed in the claims, may be embodied in a plurality of forms.

Referring to said drawings:

Figure 1 is an elevation of the brooder stove of my invention.

Fig. 2 is a vertical section taken on the line 22 Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a plan view of the lower drum with the cover removed, and

Fig. 4 is a plan view of the upper drum with the cover removed, both views being on a smaller scale than Figs. 1 and 2.

The brooder stove of my invention is particularly adapted for use in raising young crickens, and although it may be used with other young fowl, its principal use will be with chicks. The stove is arranged in a large brooder room and operates to maintain the room warm at an even temperature and at the same time supplies sufiicient fresh air to provide proper ventilation of the room, so that healthy strong chicks are produced.

The brooder comprises 'a hollow conical base 2 which sets over an aperture in the floor 3 of the brooder-room, so that fresh air may flow freely into the base. Mounted on the base is an air shaft 4 through which the fresh air ascends. Mounted on the air shaft, in spaced relation vertically are a plurality of sheet metal drums or radiators 5,6, connected together by suitable struts 7. The lower radiator 5 is preferably cylindrical in shape and is provided with flat top and bottom walls 8, 9. The upper radiator 6, is pro vided with a flat bottom wall 12 and a conical upper wall 13. Arranged below the lower radiator 5 and spaced therefrom is a metallic floor protector plate 14.

The air shaft 4, is provided between the protector plate 14 and the bottom 9 of the lower radiator with a plurality of apertures 15 through which fresh air passes outward radially below the bottom radiator and into the room. 1 Between the radiators, the air shaft is provided with a similar plurality of apertures 16, through which fresh air passes outward radially between the the radiators. At the top of the air shaft there is arranged a deflecting cap 17 which is vertically adjustable to vary the proportion of air passing through the apertures, and in that manner governing the ventilation'at the different levels.

Arranged between the protecting plate 14 and the lower radiator is a burner 18, shown diagrammatically of suitable construction, preferably a liquid fuel burner, the products of combustion of which are discharged into the lower radiator. From the lower radiator, the products of combustion pass through the flue 19 into the upper radiator. The flue 19 is placed diametrically opposite the burner and radial baflle walls 21 in the lower radiator arranged at right angles to the radius drawn through the center of the flue, causes the hot gases to pass entirely around the lower radiator before they discharge therefrom. The bafiie walls 21 are spaced from the periphery of the lower radiator to permit the flow of the hot gases from the burner to the flue 19. From the upper radiator 6, the gases pass up the stack 22, which extends upward to the outside air and which is placed diametrically opposite the flue 19. The upper radiator 6 is also provided with radially extending baflie walls 23 placed between the flue and the stack, to cause the hot gases to pass circumferentially through the upper radiator before they pass into the stack.

The air in the air shaft is heated by the gases in the radiators and caused to rise therein, producing a current of warm air in the air shaft. Some of the alr discharges through the "apertures and in passing out radially is heated further by the bottom of the lower radiator. This lower stream of warm air passes outward into the room,

a over the top of the chicks backs, supplying warmth just where it is needed. The air discharging through the apertures 16, is heated by the lower and upper radiators, and since the upper radiator is greater in diameter than the lower radiator, this stream of air is distributed outward further than the air stream from the lower apertures, insuring a wide distribution of the .of m invention not onl is the incomin fresh air heated, but the air in the room and the chicks are warmed by radiation from the sides of the radiators. By dividing the incoming air into a plurality of streamsentering the room at different levels no drafts or harsh air currents will strike the chicks, but proper ventilation will be pro-vided.

I have also provided means for maintaining the temperature of the fresh warm air substantially constant, so that the chicks will at all times be subjected to air of proper temperature, and this I accomplish by varying the volume of air passing through the stove. Arranged in the air shaft or in the conical base 2 is a preferably, conical flue, through which the incoming air passes. Suspended above the flue from a lever 26, is a valve 27, which is movable vertically to vary the amount of air'passing through the" aperture. The lever 26 extends through a slot in the air shaft and is connected at its outer end to a suitable thermostat 28, which is preferably supported from the upper radiator 6 and spaced outward radially from the upper radiator, so that it is in fluenced by the temperature of the air passing outwardly between the two radiators.

, The thermostat comprises preferably a plurality of ether wafers or diaphragms 29 arranged in series, so that the individual effects thereof are additive. An expansion of the thermostat, due to an increase in temperature, raises the valve 27 to permit the flow of a greater volume of air, thus reducing its temperature, and a contraction of the thermostat, lowers the valve, reducing the amount of air flowing and consequently raising its temperature. The movement of the valve is gradual so that the temperature of the air discharged into the room remains substantially constant.

I claim:

lfA brooder stove comprising a hollow base, an air shaft rising from said base, radiators spaced apartvertically and surrounding said shaft and through which gases of combustion pass, said air shaft being provided with apertures between the radiators and below the lower radiator,'to discharge air in different horizontal planes.

2. A brooder stove comprising a'hollow base, an air shaft rising from said base and provided with a plurality of apertures at different heights, means for heating the air in said shaft, and means arranged in spaced relation on the stack and above respective groups of the apertures for deflecting the warmed air laterally.

3. A brooder stove comprising a hollow base, an air shaft rising from said base, and a radiator surrounding said air shaft and having a. flat bottom to deflect air horizontally, said air shaft being provided with apertures immediately below said radiator.

4. A brooder stove comprising a hollow base, an air shaft rising from said base, a radiator surrounding said air-shaft and having a flat bottom, said air shaft being provided with apertures immediately belowsaid radiator, and a second radiator surrounding said air shaftand arranged above and spaced from said first radiator, said air shaft being provided with apertures between said radiators.

5. A brooder stove comprising an upright air shaft, and radiators surrounding said air shaft and in thermal communication therewith, said radiators being spaced apart vertically and said air shaft being provided with apertures between said radiators and below the lower radiator.

6. A brooder stove comprising an upright air shaft, radiators surrounding said air shaft and in thermal communication therewith, said radiators being spaced apart ,ver-

tically and said air shaft being provided with apertures between said radiators .and below the lower radiator, and a protector plate below the lower apertures and disposed parallel to the bottom of the lower radiator. I

7 A brooder stove comprising an upright air shaft, vertically space d radiators surrounding and in thermal communication with said air shaft, a burner associated with the lower radiator, a flue for the products of combustion connecting the lower and upper radiators and a stack rising from the upper radiator, said air shaft being provided with apertures between the radiators and below the lower radiator.

8. A brooder stove comprising an upright air shaft provided with rows of apertures, the rows being spaced apart vertically, and vertically spaced radiators for heating the air in said shaft and for directing the air passing through said apertures radially outward from said shaft.

9. A brooder stove comprising an upright air shaft provided with two rows of apertures, the rows being spaced apart vertically, a radiator having a fiat bottom and a flat top surrounding the air shaft between said rows of apertures and a radiator having a fiat bottom surrounding the air shaft above the upper row of apertures.

10. A brooder stove comprising an air shaft, a cylindrical radiator surrounding the air shaft, a second radiator of larger diameter than the cylindrical radiator surrounding the shaft above and spaced from the cylindrical radiator, a burner associated with the cylindrical radiator, and a flue for the products of combustion connecting said ra diators and a stack on the upper radiator, said shaft being provided with apertures between the radiators and below the cylindrical radiator.

11. A brooder stove comprising an apertured air shaft, vertically spaced radiators surrounding the shaft at imperforate portions thereof, a burner associated with the lower radiator, the products of combustion from the burner passing through said lower radiator, baffle walls in said lower radiator, a flue connecting the lower radiator with the upper radiator, baflie walls in the upper radiator and a stack rising from the upper radiator.

12. A brooder stove comprising an air shaft, a deflecting cap on the upper end of said shaft, a cylindrical radiator surrounding the shaft, a second radiator surrounding the shaft above and spaced from the cylindrical radiator, said second radiator being larger in diameter than the cylindrical radiat or, a flat top and a flat bottom on the cylindrical radiator lying in planes normal to the air shaft, a flat bottom on the second radiator parallel to the top of the cylindrical radiator, and a flat plate below and spaced from the bottom of the cylindrical radiator and parallel thereto, said shaft being provided with apertures between the radiators and between the cylindrical radiator and the flat plate.

13. A brooder stove comprising an air shaft provided with apertures, a radiator surrounding said shaft and heating the air therein and means operative by variations in the temperature of the air discharging from said shaft for varying the volume of air passing through said shaft.

14:. A brooder stove comprising an air shaft with apertures through which air passes, radiators surrounding said shaft and heating the air therein, a valve in said shaft, and a thermostat connected to said valve and influenced by the air discharging from said apertures.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand at San Francisco, California, this 16th day of January, 1920.

JESSE E. KRESKY.

In presence of If G. PRos'r.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3139881 *May 29, 1962Jul 7, 1964Hupp CorpInfrared chicken brooder
US6679432 *Aug 8, 2002Jan 20, 2004Arizant Healthcare Inc.Audible indication of disconnection between a convective device and an air hose in a convective warming system
Classifications
U.S. Classification237/3, 119/306, 236/6
International ClassificationA01K31/00, A01K31/18
Cooperative ClassificationA01K31/18
European ClassificationA01K31/18