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Publication numberUS1395932 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 1, 1921
Filing dateMay 19, 1919
Priority dateMay 19, 1919
Publication numberUS 1395932 A, US 1395932A, US-A-1395932, US1395932 A, US1395932A
InventorsEdwin G Staude
Original AssigneeEdwin G Staude
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gas-engine governor
US 1395932 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E` G. STAUDE.

GAS ENGINE GOVERNOR. APPLICAUON FILED MAY 19. 19m.

1 ,395,982 Patented Nov. l, 1921.

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EDWIN G. STAUDE, OF MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA.

GAS-ENGINE GOVERNOR.

Application filed May 19,

To all whom, t may concern:

Be it known that I, EDWIN G. STAUDE, a citizen of Minneapolis, county of Hennepin, State of Minnesota, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Gas- Engine Governors, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates in general to devices for automatically controlling the speed of internal combustion engines, particularly of the automotive high speed type Aand the general object of the invention is to provide a simple inexpensive and effective speed governor for this type of engine. A more particular object is to provide a simple automatic speed controlling device or vgovernor that may be readily attached to any existing engine for the purpose of preventing racing of the engine with an open or partially open throttle when starting the engine or when the load is suddenly thrown off and to automatically control the speed of the engine under varying loads.

A further object is to provide simple and convenient means for adjusting the governor to control and keep the engine running at any desired speed regardless of the load on the engine.

My invention consists in certain constructions and combinations as hereinafter described and particularly pointed out in the claims, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in whichy Figure 1 is a side elevation of a portion of an engine having my invention attached thereto,

Fig. 2 is a section of the governor attachment on the line 2 2 of Fig. 1,

Fig. 3 is a vertical section through a portion of the intake manifold and attachment showing the governor under loaded conditions and means for adjustment,

Fig. 4 is a similar section illustrating governor position when the load on the engine is released and also showing a modified forni of adjustment.

In the drawings 5 represents the engine cylinders, 6 is the carbureter and 7 the intake manifold through which the air and fuel are conducted to the engine. The carbureter 6 and manifold 7 may be of anypreferred construction and form, but usually they are connected by means of bolts passing through holes in the flanges 8 and 9 of the carbureter and manifold respectively. I prefer to insert a block 10 be- Speci'fication of Letters Patent.

Patented Nov. 1, 1921. 1919. seriai No. 298,246.

tween the flanges 8 and 9 and secure it by means of bolts 11. Suitable packings l2 may be provided between the adjoining surfaces and a conical opening 13 through the block 10 forms a connecting passage between tlie carbureter passage 14 and manifold .passage 15. opening 13 is pointed toward the manifold passage 15 and a conical coil spring 16 is secured at this end of the opening preferably by having its end coil between the conical or shouldered face 17 of the block 10 and a shoulder 18 of the manifold 7. The annular spaces 19 between the coils of the spring form passages through which the air or gas must pass on its way from the carbureter to the engine cylinders. The usual hand controlled throttle valve 20 may be retained in the carbureter passage 14 for convenience in slowing down the engine or for other purposes. It will be understood that the coils of the spring 16 are of suitable size of wire and wound to a certain pitch and in a certain number of coils in proportion to the free length of the spring so that normally the total area of the passages between the coils approximates the area of the passages 14 and 15.

It will be readily seen that with an open or partially open throttle 20, and with an increase in the speed of the engine the vacuum 1n t-he manifold passage 15 will be'intensified, caused by the frictional resistance encountered by the air or gas in passing between the spring coils and that the added rush of the air and inward pressure against the conical coils will instantly tend to close the spring and reduce the passage area between the coils. The effect of this reduction is to cut down the gas supply to the engine and restore the engine speed to normal. A slight decrease of the load on the engine would have the effect of closing the inner larger coils, partially cutting off theV flow of gas and as the load is released or the speed tends to increase the smaller coils will also close as shown in Fig. 4 to restore the engine speed. I prefer to provide a small opening 21 in the outer end of the s ring of sufficient size to keep the engine id ing at normal speed. For the purpose of adjusting the speed of the engine to any desired number of ref-folutions per minute I have shown two slightly different methods of adjustment. Referring to Fig. 3 a threaded sleeve 22 having a thumb nut 23 is screwed into the manifold 7 The large'exit. end of the pressure to axially in line with the conical spring 16. A rod 24 having a collar 25 is attached to the outer and small end of the spring 16 preferably by means 'of a pin 26 passing through the rod 24 and between the coils of the spring. A coil compression spring 27 is arranged on the rod 24 and bearing against the collar 25 and Sleeve 22 exerts resist the closing of the conical spring 16. This pressure may be regulated by turning the thumb nut 23 in either direction to tighten or loosen the spring 27 and a check nut 28 may be provided to lock the sleeve in place when adjusted. `rlihe compression resistance of the conical spring 16 in Fig. 3 is normally less than sufficient to keep the engine at the desired speed and may be added to in any desired degree by the variable pressure of the adjusting spring 27.

ln Fig. 4 the conical governor spring 29 normally has a compression resistance in excess of the requirements, and a tension spring 30 is connected to the outer end of the spring 29 and to a threaded rod 31 having adjusting nuts 32,by which the compression resistance of the governing spring 29 is overcome and varied. As the degree of resistance to the closing of the governing spring is varied the normal speed at which the engine is controlled by the governor 1s varied accordingly.

lf claim as my invention:

1. A governor for internal combustion engines comprising a pipe having a passage for air and fuel to the engine, a helical spring arrangedin said passage and having openings for the passage of air and fuel between its coils, the coils of said spring being adapted for compression in line with its axis to close said openings, the suction of the engine compressing said coils and closing said openings to reduce the area thereof and the flow of air and fuel to the engine.

2. A governor for internal combustion engines comprising a pipe havinga passage for air and fuel to the engine, a helical spring arranged in said passage and having openings for the passage of air and fuel between its coils, the coils of said springbeing adapted for compression in line with its axis to close said openings, the suction of the engine compressing sald coils and closing said openings to reduce the area thereof and the flow of air and fuel to the engine, and means for adjusting said coils and yieldingly resisting the closing of the openings between them.

3. A governor for internal combustion engines comprising a pipe having a passage for air and fuel to the engine, a helical spring arranged in said passage and having openings for the flow of air and fuel passage and having openings for the flow of air and fuel between its coils, the coils of said spring being adapted for compression in line with its axis to close said openings, the suction of the engine compressing said coils and closing said openings to reduce the area thereof and the flow of air and fuel to the engine, and the apex of said coil having a loop provided with an opening to allow the passage of fuel sufficient to run idle. j

4. A governor for internal combustion engines comprising a pipe-having a passage for air and fuel to the engine and provided with a seat in its wall, a helical spring arranged in said passage and fitting at one end against the seat in the wall ofsaid pipe, said spring having openings between its coils for the passage of air and fuel, said coils being normally open to allow the flow of the fuel gas and air therethrough and the suction of the engine compressing said spring and closing the coils, thereby reducing the area of the opening and the flow of air and fuel to the engine. 5. A governor for internal combustion enines comprising a pipe having a passage for air and fuel to the engine, a cone-shaped helical spring seated at one end in the wall of said pipe and having openings between its coilsfor the passage ofair and fuel, the aggregate area of said openings being substantially equal to the cross sectional area of said pipe, the coils of said spring being adapted for compression in line with its axis to close the openings and the suction of the engine compressing the coils and closing the openingsto' reduce the area thereof and the flow of air and fuel to the engine.

the engine ln witness whereof, I have hereunto set l my hand this 8th day of Ma EDWIN 1919' STAUDE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2850897 *Jun 24, 1955Sep 9, 1958Bell & Gossett CoFlow meter with conical spring restriction
US3469565 *Aug 17, 1967Sep 30, 1969Caterpillar Tractor CoCrankcase ventilating means for internal combustion engines
US3494339 *Jun 14, 1967Feb 10, 1970John Jame FernandezSelf-cleaning smog control filter and fire trap for internal combustion engines
US3703913 *Aug 2, 1971Nov 28, 1972Cvc CoAutomatic rate of flow control valve
US3756270 *Apr 25, 1972Sep 4, 1973Monocar Hc Internacional SaAuxiliary anti pollution air intake device for internal combustion engines
US3957083 *Jan 27, 1975May 18, 1976The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Air ForcePressure sensitive regulating valve
US4300506 *Jul 20, 1979Nov 17, 1981Robert Bosch GmbhFuel supply system
US4700746 *Mar 13, 1985Oct 20, 1987Anchor/Darling Valve CompanyControl valve for high pressure fluids
US5335862 *Nov 5, 1992Aug 9, 1994Elopak Systems A.G.Discharge nozzle for a liquid filling assembly
US8627805 *Mar 27, 2010Jan 14, 2014Cummins Inc.System and apparatus for controlling reverse flow in a fluid conduit
US20110232615 *Sep 29, 2011Perr J VictorSystem and apparatus for controlling reverse flow in a fluid conduit
US20140338763 *May 20, 2013Nov 20, 2014Proportion-Air, Inc.Spring controlled valve
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/479, 251/902, 261/65
International ClassificationF02D9/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02D9/00, F02D2700/0207, Y10S251/902
European ClassificationF02D9/00