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Publication numberUS1396033 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 8, 1921
Filing dateNov 19, 1920
Priority dateFeb 3, 1920
Publication numberUS 1396033 A, US 1396033A, US-A-1396033, US1396033 A, US1396033A
InventorsFrancis Charles W
Original AssigneeGillespie Eden Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method for making windings
US 1396033 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. W. FRANCIS.

METHOD FOR MAKING WINDINGS.

APPLICATION FILED NOV. 19, 1920.

INVENTOR.

( 6W ATTORNEYS ceedi'ng coil surrounds PATENT OFFICE NEW JERSEY, ASSIGNOR TO GILLESPIE EDEN A CORPORATION OF DELAWARE.

METHOD FOR MAKING WIN DIN GS.

Original application filed February 3, 1920, Serial No. 356,027.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Nov. 8, 1921. Divided and this application filed Novemher 19, 1920. Serial No. 425,052.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, CHARLES W'. F RANOIS, a citizen of the United States, residing at Paterson, in the county of Passaic and State of New Jersey, have invented certain'new and useful Improvements in Methods for Making Windings, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to methods for making a winding which is particularly adapted for the field coils ofmulti-polar'electric machines, it being understood that the method is capable of use in the making of windings of a large variety of shapes and for different purposes.

One of the objects of my invention is to provide a method for making a winding in which there shall be a number of flat, separate coils of increasing sizes and arranged with suiiicient space between the sides of the coil so that thesame may be slipped around the poles of a multi-polar field piece, which winding shall be of one continuous piece of wire, so that the winding can be made cheaply and at the same time have its insulation uniform throughout the completed windin Another object of my invention is to provide a method for making such'a' winding as has just been described and others of a similar character in which coils occupying the same planemay'be wound so that each sucthe preceding inner coil and yet is separated therefrom by a considerable space, and particularly a method by which such winding may be carried out in a continuous manner by the placing of suitable forms in position after the preceding form has received its predetermined number of turnsof wire.

With these and other objects in view, my invention consists of the method hereinafter fully described and particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

This application is a division of my application Serial N 0. 356,027, filed February 3rd, 1920, entilted Apparatus for making windings.

In the drawings, Figure 1 illustrates one form of windin which my method is adapted to produce, ig. 2 is a side elevation on a relatively small scale of an illustrative arrangement of forms on which the winding of Fig. 1 may be produced; Fig. 3 is a front elevation of Fig. 2 with some of the parts removed showing the first or inner coil of the winding being formed; and Figs. 4 and 5 are views similar to Fig. 2, but'with successive outer forms moved into position.

In the drawings, the same parts are re.- ferred to by the same reference characters in the several views.

Fig. 1 is a side elevation, more or less diagrammatic, of a form of winding such as the method described herein is particularly designed to make. In this drawing only two layers of wire have been shown in each coil, but it will be understood that as many as desired may be provided, and particularly that the number of turns in each plane, which will determine the, width of the winding, may be of any desired number. Beginning at the terminal 10, the wire, which is continuous throughout the winding, passes into the inner coil 11 around which, in the diagrammatic view, it passes twice completely, the end 12 then passing to the next coil 13 around which it again passes twice completely, with its end 14: passing to the outer coil 15, the end of which, 16, is preferably bent upwardly parallel to or around the terminal 10. It will be understood that any desired number of coils may be formed in the winding.

It will be observed that in the form shown in Fig. 1, the top and bottom of the respective coils are adjacent each other, whereas the sides are widely separated from the sides of adjacentcoils.

In order to provide an easy method by which the winding may be kept in shape and position until the winding is placed in the machine in which it is to be used, I preferably provide a temporary binding wire such as l7, 18, at the top and bottom of the winding, this temporary binding wire being fastened so as to hold the coils together until they are in position of use.

It, of course, is not new to form a wind ing of a number of coils, but the particular advantage of my method consists of forming such a winding from a continuous piece of wireso that the insulation on the wire is continuous throughout the winding. Furthermore, in the forming of such a winding, the delay occasioned by fastening the ends of successive coils together is avoided.

In order to form such a codes that shown I Fig. 1Q

through,holes in the give a tension to the space between on the pins 25.

in Fig. 1, I preferably wind the desired number of turns around a former which is shapedto ,give the. required interior. shapeto theinner coil tinued until the desired size of coil is obtained. Then, without removing the inner coil 11 from its former, former around the inner coil 11 and continue the winding from the coil 11 around this'secondary former, which winding is continued. again for the required number of turns when I again placeanother secondary iormer'around the preceding one, and continue the winding around this. The placing of successively larger secondary formers around the preceding formers is thus continued until thedesired number of, coils is obtained, when'the ends of the winding are carried up adjacent to each other, and preferably I the entire winding temporarily bound, as by temporary binders 17, 18 of As one convenient design of formers which may be used conveniently to carry out my method, I preferably arrange a series of plates20, 21 and 22, each having projecting pins located so as to enable one ofthe coils of the desired winding to'be formed there'- on. follower plate 24 is provided to be held normally in a'fixed position, but being capable of movement away from the plate 21, so that the finished winding may be removed from the pins constituting the formers. The plate 21 has projectin from the face thereof, pins 25, and the follower plate has holes into which the pins 25- may project, the plates 21 and 24 being positioned so as to have a space therebetween into which the wire lV,'shown in Fig. 3, may be passed and wound around the pins 25 as the plates 21 and 24 are rotated. Rollers R and It may be provided in the usual manner to the wire as it is being wound on theformer. 'As a matter'of convenience, the former plates may be mounted on a shaft 26 so that they may be readily rotated, and the follower plate'24 may be mounted on a stud or support 27, this support" being arranged to permit the plate 24 to be moved to the right of Fig. 2. j The plate 22 is provided with a set of pins 28 which, while the coil is being wound on the pins 25,"are projected into, but not plate 21. Similarly, pins 29 on the plate 23 are projected through holes in the plate 22, but do nOt'eXtend into the plates 21 and 24.

B my method, to produce the winding shown in 1, the end of the wire is first attached in any suitable manner to the foriner plate 21, and all the f gether with the follower plate, are thenroformer plates, to-

tated a predetermined number of turns until the inner coil 11 o'fthe wlnding s formed Then, preferably, without 11, such turns being con-" I place a secondary V produced.

'28 to be projected across the spacebetween the plates 21 and 24. Thereupon, the wire will be passedaround the four pins 28 to form the coil13 of the winding. When this coil is finished, the plates are again moved to the position shown in Fig. 5 with the pins 29 projecting across the space between the plates 22 and 24, and the last coil 15 of the winding is then formed around these pins.

Spaces. 30 are provided in the sides of the plates 21'and 24 of sufficient depth to enable the temporary iastening wires 17, 18 to be passed around the finishe d coil. fastening wires are now placed around the winding to retain the several coils in position and to prevent the coils from unwinding. Then the plate 24 is moved to the right of Fig.5 and after the wire W is'cut; is slipped from the ends of the several pins constituting the former. The plates are then restored to the position shown in Fig; 2 ready for the next winding.

It'willbe noted that the position of the pins 25, 28 and 29 as shown in Fig. 3 is such Such the finished winding,

that the upper and lower sides ofthe coils in the windings are in contact with each other,as shown in Fig. 1. It will also be noted that by mounting the formers in the manner shown, successive formers may be thrown into operation without stopping the rotation of the coil which has just been formed. Y

It will be understood that the arrangeas shown in Fig. 3, will be varied in accordance with the form or the winding to be I claim:- I 1 V i 1 The method of. forming from a continuous piece of wire, a winding having a plurality of separate sively increasing area, which conslsts in winding a coil by a continuous relative motion between the source of wire supply and a form, surrounding the'coil thus formed,

while the said relative motion between it fiat coils of: p'rogresand the supply of wire continues, with a larger form, between which and said source or wire supply the said relative motion exists; continuing the windingfrom'the coil just formed to] and I by means of said continuing relative motion and repeating these steps with successsively larger forms while maintainingthe relative motion between the source of wire around the larger form supply and the coils and their forms until the desired number of coils is formed.

2. The method of forming from a continuous piece of wire, a winding having a plurality of separate fiat coils of progressivel increasing area, which consists in winc ing a coil by a continuous relative motion between the source of wire supply and a form; surrounding the coil thus formed, whil the said relative motion between it and the supply of wire continues, with a larger form, between which and said source of wire supply the said relative motion exists; continuing the winding from the coil just formed to and around the larger form by means of said continuing relative motion; repeating these steps with successively larger forms while maintaining the relative motion between the source of wire supply and the coils and their forms until the desired number of coils is formed; then stop ping said relative motion, binding the adjacent sides of the coils together and removing the entire winding from all the forms.

3. The method of forming from a continuous piece of wire, a winding having a plurality of separate flat coils of progressively increasing area, which consists in winding a coil on a continuously rotating form, surrounding the coil last formed, while it is rotating, with a unitary larger rotating form and continuing the winding from the coil last formed to and around the larger form, repeating these steps, while continuing the rotation of the formed coils with their forms, until the desired number of coils is formed, then stopping the rotation and removing the entire winding from all the forms.

4:. The method of forming from a continuous piece of wire, a winding having a plurality of separate flat coils of progressively increasing area, which consists in winding a coil on a continuously rotating form, surrounding the coil last formed, while it is rotating, with a unitary larger rotating form and continuing the winding from the coil last formed to and around the larger form, repeating these steps, while continuing the rotation of the formed coils with their forms, until the desired number of coils is formed, then stopping the rotation, binding the adjacent sides of the coils together, and removing the entire winding from all the forms.

5. The method of forming a winding having a plurality of coils all in the same plane and successively surrounding one an other, which consists in winding a coilon a form, surrounding said coil by a larger form by moving said last-named form into position from one face of said coil, winding a second coil on said larger form with wire continued from the first coil, surrounding the coils thus formed by a larger form brought into position from the same face of the coil, repeating these steps until the desired number of coils is wound, fastening the coils together, and removing the whole winding from the forms by moving it in the same direction that the forms were moved when brought into position.

CHARLES vV. FRANCIS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2558621 *Apr 5, 1948Jun 26, 1951Martilla Frank HCoil winding device
US2715922 *Nov 17, 1949Aug 23, 1955Bell Telephone Labor IncMethod and apparatus for forming cables
US3346021 *Mar 5, 1965Oct 10, 1967Ross Albert IApparatus for winding armature coils
US3481372 *May 22, 1967Dec 2, 1969Fort Wayne Tool & Die IncCoil forming method and apparatus
US3631591 *May 13, 1969Jan 4, 1972Essex International IncMethod and apparatus for making concentric, multiturn nested dynamoelectric machine field coils
US3667510 *Feb 24, 1970Jun 6, 1972Klaus Dieter SattlerApparatus for winding coils for electrical machines
US3672027 *Jun 1, 1970Jun 27, 1972Gen ElectricCoil developing apparatus
US3855694 *Aug 20, 1973Dec 24, 1974Philips CorpMethod of winding deflection coils for picture display tubes
US3968566 *Dec 19, 1974Jul 13, 1976Licentia Patent-Verwaltungs-G.M.B.H.Method of forming a deflection yoke system
US4039988 *May 6, 1976Aug 2, 1977U.S. Philips CorporationDeflection coil having sections with minimum winding density portions and spaces
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US4588166 *Feb 6, 1984May 13, 1986Ernest CloudTrap hauler and ejector
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US5340044 *Apr 26, 1993Aug 23, 1994U.S. Philips CorporationMethod of manufacturing a saddle-shaped deflection coil for a picture display tube
US5680692 *Oct 3, 1994Oct 28, 1997General Electric CompanyFabrication of induction motors
US5793138 *May 27, 1997Aug 11, 1998General Electric CompanyFabrication of induction motors
US5990588 *Dec 13, 1996Nov 23, 1999General Electric CompanyInduction motor driven seal-less pump
US6274962Jul 6, 1999Aug 14, 2001General Electric CompanyInduction motor driven seal-less pump
US6578251Apr 27, 2001Jun 17, 2003General Electric CompanyMethod of fabrication of an induction motor driven seal-less pump
Classifications
U.S. Classification140/92.2, 29/596, 310/265, 29/732
International ClassificationH02K15/04
Cooperative ClassificationH02K15/0435
European ClassificationH02K15/04D