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Publication numberUS1398209 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 22, 1921
Filing dateMay 21, 1919
Priority dateMay 21, 1919
Publication numberUS 1398209 A, US 1398209A, US-A-1398209, US1398209 A, US1398209A
InventorsBavegem Edgar Van
Original AssigneeBavegem Edgar Van
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of constructing reinforced concrete structures
US 1398209 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

. E. VAN BAVEGEM.

METHOD OF CONSTRUCTING REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES.

APPLICATION FILED MAY 21, I919.

1,398,209., Patented Nov. 22, 1921.

3 SHEETS-SHEET I.

WITNESSES I V Bl/VVENTOR dyer am awyei/l.

E. VAN BAVEGEM.

METHOD OF CONSTRUCTING REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES.

- APPLICATION FILED MAY 21, l9l9. 1,398,209

Patented Nov. 22, 1921.

3 SHEETSSHEET 2.

' WITNESSES IIVVENTOR EdgarVZuz 3a veg/em.

A TTOHll/EYS E. VAN BAVEGEM.

METHOD OF CONSTRUCTING REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES.

APPLICATION FILED MAY 21. 1919.

1,398,209 Patented Nov. 22, 1921.

W152? fig T lA/I/E/VTOR W Arromms UNITED sTArEs.

PATENT OFFICE.

EDGAR VA'N BAVEGEM, OF OOSTERZEELE, BELGIUM.

METHOD OF CONSTRUCTING REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES.

Application filed Kay 21,

To all whom it may concern Be it known that I, EDGAR VAN BAvEcEM, a subject of the King of Belgium, and a resident of the village of Oosterzeele, Flanders, Belgium, have invented a new and Improved Method of Constructing Reinforced Concrete Structures, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description.

This invention relates to reinforced concrete structures. According to the invention, hollow walls of reinforced concrete are molded complete, in a horizontal position, with window casement and door frames, and cornices Where required. The mold receives the concrete to form the outside wall surface, into which metallic reinforcement with inwardly projecting strengthening ribs is laid and covered with concrete, after which the cavities are filled with sand, and an inner wall is formed by molding over the projecting reinforcing ribs. The sand can then be removed through openings. Each wall when erected afterward, consists of inside and outside wall faces with vertical reinforced concrete connections for strength, both wall faces being completely molded and finished. Monoblock wall units made in this way are easily joined together and to other parts of the structure, either removably by means of bolts, or in a permanent manner' with reinforcing bars embedded at the joints, to make a monoblock structure.

Each wall section made as above described is complete from basement to cornice. It can be transported where necessary, and is very well adapted for use in building comparatively s all structures such as cottages or bungalow? Drawings.

frames, base and cornice, ready for use in I the mold; A

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the inner wall surface;

Figs. 6, 7 8 and 9 show sections of oints between walls, illustrating different methods Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Nov. 22, 1921. 1919. Serial No. 298,606. v

pf making the joints between the Wall secions; I

F 1g. 10 shows in section the top of a wall with a pro ecting terrace, and it also illustrates part of a reinforced concrete ceiling;

Fig. 11 shows in vertical section a completfe wall, and a part of a ceiling, and fiat roo Flg. 12 shows in horizontal section parts of the walls, both external and internal, of a house.

Desomlption.

The horizontal mold as in Fig. 1, is prepared as follows: It has a thick bed a of clay, for example, or any other suitable molding materlal, and two retaining walls 5 and c. On this are arranged four adjustable walls or boards d, e, f,g, which are adjusted according to the dimensions of the wall section to be made.

In molding an outside wall, I press into the layer a the properly shaped molding forms, using a flatbottomed press. The press and the forms are removed, and the shaped clay surface is coated with oil or the like to prevent the concrete from adhering to the clay; then, with the retaining boards d, e, f, g, properly adjusted, I run in the first layer of concrete. When the concrete layer has been introduced, I insert as in-Figs. 2 and 3, the metallic reinforcing structure it, formed of suitable material such as metal net. and shaped as seen'in Fig. 4 for instance. This structure may be provided with a base 2', a cornice 7', window and door frames is, Z, and several vertical reinforcing ribs m. It also has rings or staples n projecting beyond the ribs and serving for lifting and transporting the wall when molded. When this reinforcing structure is laid on the first layer of concrete, another run of concrete is applied over it to embed it, the concrete being shaped up over the projecting ribs with a suitable tool to incase them up to about an inch from the top.

When this part of the molding is finished, the spaces between the reinforcing ribs and the like are filled in with sand as high as the concrete on the reinforcing ribs, 2'. 'e., about an inch from the top; then a flat metallic reinforcing net-work with window and door apertures is attached over the surface of the molded portion, and is embedded in a layer of concrete or cement, stucco, or

the like, which is run over it to form the inner wall surface 17. This surface is finished in any way required, with or without shaped moldings. Any door or window frames are inserted with the outside reinforcing network and thus embedded in the outer walljlayer, pro'ectin through to the inner layer. When t ewa l is set, the sand is taken out through the 0 en ends of the cavities at the top end 0 the wall, and through openings 0 left in the inner wall surface where necessary as in Fig. 5. The complete wall can then be lifted by tackle attached to the rings n exposed through holes y in the inner wall surface, and transported to the place where the building is to be erected.

Wall sections canv be joined together in.

the structure to form either removable or permanent connections as required. Figs.

are embedded angle bars of L or T shape as re uired, at suitable distances apart.

emovable joints are made as in Figs. 8 and 9; holes to receive bolts are formed at suitable intervals in the wall ends, and bolts and ties r, s are used to hold the sections together. The space in the gaps t is filled in with concrete, as seen in Fig. 12.

The ceilings '0 may be made up of slabs molded in a similar manner to the walls, and of a length sufiicient to extend over the whole length of the space to be covered, while their width may be any convenient unit. Adjacent slabs fit together with joggled joints as at a, Fig. 10. If a projecting coping or terrace is to be provided, the tops of the walls are surmounted with blocks formed with projecting portions w. If a flat roof is needed, this is made up in sections w fitted together in suitable widths as in Fig. 11.

The complete building forms thus a unitary structure made up of ready molded monoblock sections, and the labor of erection is made as simple as possible. In the example of construction illustrated, the reinforcing network for the wall is flat, with Claims.

, l. The herein described method of constructing concrete walls consisting in shaping a recumbent mold having a bed of clay, coating the clay with oil, pouring 'a thin layer of concrete into the mold, then placing on the first layer-of concrete a ribbed reinforcing structure'having door and window frames conforming to the shape of the mold and having upwardly projecting staples attached thereto, then pouring in a second thin layer of concrete to embed the edges of the reinforcing structure, then placing a layer of sand uponth'e concrete, leaving only the edges of the reinforcing structure and the staples exposed, then pouring in another layer of concrete and leaving openings in this last mentioned layer to expose the staples, then raising the wall and removing.

the sand. 7 g

2. The herein described method of constructing concrete walls consisting in shap- .ing a recumbent mold having a bed of clay,

coating the clay with oil, pouring a thin layer of concrete into the mold, then placing on the first layer of concrete a ribbed reinforcing structure having door and window frames conforming to .the shape of the mold and having upwardly projecting staples attached thereto, then pouring in a second thin layer of concrete to embed the edges of the reinforcing structure, then placing a layer of sand upon the concrete, leaving only the edges of the reinforcing structure and the staples exposed, then pouring in another layer of concrete and leaving openings in this last mentioned layer to expose the staples, then attaching suitable hoisting apparatus to the staples and raising the wall and then removing the sand.

EDGAR VAN BAVEGEM. Witnesses for si nature only: Emu. VoN ONSIELE, CARL C. LUMRY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2490537 *Aug 24, 1943Dec 6, 1949Myer Wilbur VBuilding construction
US2516453 *Feb 14, 1946Jul 25, 1950Preload Entpr IncMethod of prefabricating parts for concrete structures
US2596914 *Dec 9, 1948May 13, 1952Nicholas PiacentinoMethod of making concrete building units
US2598830 *Dec 29, 1949Jun 3, 1952Ibec Housing CorpApparatus for molding concrete walls
US2634601 *Sep 9, 1949Apr 14, 1953Cloyd TilleryBuilding wall construction
US2666974 *Jun 11, 1951Jan 26, 1954Gerald Leanse LeonMethod of producing upright hollow walls of reinforced concrete
US2715013 *Jul 26, 1948Aug 9, 1955Us Lift Slab CorpApparatus for erecting a building
US2825115 *Jun 27, 1951Mar 4, 1958Williams Chester IApparatus for handling forms
US5369930 *Jun 3, 1993Dec 6, 1994Kreizinger; Kenneth R.Method of manufacturing a hollow core, concrete building panel
US6021612 *Jul 16, 1996Feb 8, 2000C&D Technologies, Inc.Sound absorptive hollow core structural panel
Classifications
U.S. Classification264/219, 264/264, 264/256, 264/253
International ClassificationE04C2/04
Cooperative ClassificationE04C2/044
European ClassificationE04C2/04D