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Publication numberUS1398237 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 29, 1921
Filing dateDec 27, 1920
Priority dateDec 27, 1920
Publication numberUS 1398237 A, US 1398237A, US-A-1398237, US1398237 A, US1398237A
InventorsJohn Michaels
Original AssigneeJohn Michaels
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Desk
US 1398237 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. MICHAELS.

DESK.

APPLICATION FILED DEC.27, I920.

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Patented Nov. 29, 11921.

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DESK. APPLICATION FILED DEC.27| I920.

Patented Nov. 29, 1921 7 SHEETSSHEET 7.

ATTORNE UNITED STATES PATENT. OFFICE.

JOHTI MICHAEL-S, 0F WESTMO'UNT, QUEBEC, CANADA.

annex.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Nov. 29, 1119210 Application filed December 27, 1920. Serial No. 433,405.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, JOHN MIOHAELS, a

subject of the King of Great Britain, and

cation.

Theinvention relates to desks as described in the present specification and illustrated in the accompanying drawings that form part of the same.

The invention consists essentially in the novel features of construction in which it will be seen that in one position the desk is low and has a flat table top, while in the other position itis high and has a sloping top and flat ledge-similar to What are usuall called accounting desks, these and the ot er elements of the construction belng more fully explained with reference to the drawings hereinafter. r

The objects of the invention are primarily to economize in oflice space where both low and high desks are desirable, and at the same time afford comfort and rest to abusy ofiice man by permitting a change in position without transferring the books and papers to another desk. A further object of this invention is to provide a safe place for the temporary concealment of documents and other papers during the absence of the ofiicer to whom the desk belongs, and also to reduce the equipment charges in large establishments. A further object is to raise and lower the top with equal facility, either action requiring scarcely any muscular effort, and to do this by simple and cheap mechanism, easy to construct, and so free from complications that it will operate continuously without special attention. Generally, the object of the invention is to provide a desk by means of which increased efficiency will be assured, particularly in large offices where many people are employed, though it will prove equally servicefastening from the able in smaller ofiices, and will afford every facility toward the better conduct of office routine.

In the drawings, Figure l is a perspective view of the desk partly broken away at the top thereof to disclose the inside of an end panel.

' Fig. 2 is a longitudinal and vertical sec-' tional view of the desk showing particularly the panel weights.

F 1g. 3 1s a pegspective detail of one of the tracks for securing the panels to the desk top.

Fig. 4 is aperspective view of the desk showing the panels operatin in a sli htl different fashion; that is t0 say,the aria permanently hinged to the top, and they sl de inwardly at the bottom instead of being hlnged at the bottom. and sliding inwardly at the top as illustrated in Fig. 1.

Fig. 5 is a longitudinal vertical section showing the operating weights for the panels.

Fig. dis a perspective detail of the hook panel to the front portion of the desk top.

Fig. 7 is a perspective detail of the track for the guide lugs from the panels.

Fig. 8 is a perspective detail of the complete desk closed in either of its forms.

Fig. 9 is an enlarged sectional detail of the leg-lifting mechanism.

Fig. 10 is a cross-sectional line AA in Fig. 9.

Fig. 11 is a perspective view of the desk View on the .showing some additional features pertaining particularly to fire-proof protection.

Fig. 12 is the desk closed as illustrated in Fig. 11.

Fig. 13 is a cross-sectional view of the desk illustrated in Figs. 11 and 12 in the showin havin outside lower permanent panel remove to disclose the slldeway for the upper elevating anel.

Fig. 16 1s a plan .view of the locklng mechanism.

. Fig. 17 is a detail of the operating push rods.

Fig. 18 is a perspective'view of the fireproof box within the desk.

- Fig. 19'is a longitudinal 890131011 of the firg proof box illustrated in Fig. 18.

ig. 20 is a fragmentary View showlng the under side of the folding shelf applicable to any form of the invention in makin a vis-a-vis desk.

ig. '21 is a fragmentar detailv of the desk wall or top or any of t e outside parts of the desk in which it will be seen that the boardin is formed of layers, the middle one of which is of fireproofing material.

Fig. 22 is a fragmentary sectional perspectlve view showing the operating parts of this invention with the end panels as lifting elements.

Fig. 23 is a perspective view of an ofiice table having a plurality of folding leaves elevatable.

Fig. 24 is a perspective view of the elevatable desk as applied to a typewriter desk in an elevated position.

Fig. 25 is a perspective view of the desk, the accompanying box or drawer remov'a le {frame carrying a *typewriting machine.

Like numerals of reference "indicate corresponding parts in the various groups of figures relating to the different forms of the invention respectively.

Referring to the drawings, in Figs. 1, 2, 3, and 20, to ether with Figs. 8,9, and 10, the body oft e desk is formed of the under table board 1 surroundedby a frame 2', supported on the legs 3 at the four corners with the end permanent lower anels 4, and the back 1panels 5 and 6, formlng a weight and rod c the legs 3 are hollow to receive the telescopic legs 7 at the front end of the desk, and these legs 7 and 8 support the desk top boards 9 .and 10,- the boards 9 and 10 meeting on the really little or no exertion about bringing the said top boards to their upper position.

amber. The frame 2 surrounds a re-. cess of which the undertable 1 is a bed, and- The end panels 18 forming a supgort for i the top boards 9 and 10, are secure to the ends of the frames 2 by the hinges 19, and on the top sides are shaped with the slope 20 and straight portion 21, so that when the panels 18 are intheir upper position they shape the top boards to the correct slope and ledge of an accounting desk.

The end panels 18 are operated by the rods 22 and 23 and the weights 24. The rods 22 are pivotally secured to the panels 18, one to each panel, and extend through slots in the under table '1 into the recess between the back anels 5 and 6, and are there ivotally joine -to the longer rods 23, whic extend over to opposite sides of the desk and are pivotally secured.

The cables 25 are connected to the long rods 23, and pass over pulleys 26 and 27, supported from the under side of the under table 1 and. carry at their lower ends the weights 28, which weights are sufiiciently heavy to carry the panels to their vertica,

position after. the weight of the desk boards has been removed therefrom.

The anchoring guides 29 are secured to the insides of the panels 18, one at each end of said panels, and are formed of the strap 30 and roller 31, the latter traveling in the tracks 32, and secured to the undersides of the desk top boards 9 and 10.

The rear, shelf 33 is hinged to the top also a checking desk. Of course, the shelf 33 may be extended in the lowered position of thefdesk also, though that is not at all a likely event. i

The drawers 36 are here shown as mounted in the frames 37, supported on casters 38 instead of fixed to the desk, as customary, thereby making it possible to have any form of cabinet arrangement for filing or other partitioned receptacle in place of the ordinary drawers. In this form of the desk, the operation of elevating is accomplished by simply raising the top with the hands,

for the compensating welghts make this a very simple and. -easy task. When the desk top is being raised to its upper position, the

panels immediately follow until they reach their vertical positions, which is under the said top boards, and which they shape for an accountmg desk with the slope and the straight ledge as customary in that class of desks.

In Figs. 4, 5, 6, and 7, together with F1gs. 8, 9, andi10, the different construction is in the arrangement of the folding panels 39v and 40, and the end fixed lower panels 41 and 42, the latter forming recesses for the weight 43 and cable 44, said cable being attached to the lower end of the panels 39 and 40, the top of said panels on the straight portion 45, being hinged to the ledge board 46 of the desk top, the sloping writing board 47 of the top being anchored to the panels 39 and by the hook 48 pivotally secured to an "outstanding lug from the plate 49, each of said panels 39 and 40 having a plate 49 rigidl-Iy secured thereto, the hooks 48 from the p ates engaging the tracks 50 secured to the under side of the writing board 47.

The handles'51 are secured to the bottom of the panels 39 and 40 on the inner sides. By means of these handles the weights are lifted until the panels are drawn inwardly toward one another at their lower ends.

The cupboards 52 are shown in place of the drawers 36, but it is practically the same construction, as they are mounted on casters and may be made on the inside in any way to meet the wants of the customer.

In the operation of this form of the invention, the handles 51 are drawn toward one another in closing the desk, that is to say, in lowering the top boards. In elevating the desk the top boards are simply lifted, and the panels 39 and 40 draw under the said top boards, and in position are in every way equivalent to the panels 18.

In Figs. 11, 12, 13, and 21, together with Figs. 9 and 10, a difference in the construction is shown, not so much in the operating mechanism. though it is still a combined high and low desk illustrated, but the feature of this is the fireproofing 53 secured with the boarding 54. The boarding forms a facing on the desk top boards 55 and 56, and the frame 57, also the under table 58, thereby making a fireproof recess 59 in which papers and other documents may be kept.

In Fig. 21 the fireproofing layer 60 is shown between boards 61 and 62, and by this means a much cheaper construction is secured than in the other figures, for the layer 60 may be made simply of asbestos paper, while in the lining 53 the material really should be an asbestos composition or asbestos and metal.

In Figs. 14, 15, 16, 1'7, and 22 a very efficient form of this invention is illustrated in which the upper end panels 63 and 64 become lifting elements, sliding upwardly and downwardly in the weight recesses 65 formed between the inner and outer lower panels 66 and 67 at each end of the desk, the said upper panels- 63 and 64 extending downwardly into said recess even in their upper position within vertical grooves in the front legs 68 and back legs 69,

The cables 70 are secured to the lower ends of the upper panels 63 and 64 and pass over the pulleys 71 journaled in brackets secured to the wall of the recess 65, and these cables at their ends carry the weights 72, which are heavy enough to compensate for the weights of the upper panels 63 and 64. and the desk top boards 73 and 74, the top board 74 being the flat ledge board in the elevated position of the desk, and the board 73 being the sloping writing board.

The panels 63 and 64 are shaped correspondingly to support these boards, and the ledge board 74 is fixedly secured to the straight portion of the upper edge face of said panels, while the writing board 73 is hinged to the ledge board 74 with the V- shaped recess 75 therebetween, as explained hereinbefore; otherwise, the writing board 73 is free to straighten out and be perfectly flush with the ledge board 75 on the lowering of the panels, as the said ledge board comes in contact with the desk frame 76, which 'alsosupportS the ledge 74; in fact, in the lower position they make one flat top with a very close joint, so that the division is not noticeable. As the upper panels 63 and 64 are lifting elements, naturally they must be held to their upper position, and to accomplish this there are many devices which may be used, but the preferable form is that shown in detail in Figs. '16 and 17.

The racks 77 at the front inner side, and

78 at the rear inner side are secured to the panels 63 and 64, and have preferably tapered teeth, though teeth may be used in any suitable form. The racks-77 are engaged by the dogs 79, and the racks 78 are engaged by the dogs 80. The reardogs 80 are connected to the crank levers 81 and 82 by the connecting rods 83 and 84, and the crank levers 81 and 82 are connected in a slotted pivotal joint 85, while the levers themselves at their angles are pivotally secured to the under side of the under table 86.

The slotted pivotal joint 85 is connected by the rod 87 to the crank levers 88 and 89 at their slotted pivotal joint 90, these being the front set of levers in the locking mecha nism.

Th'e crank levers 88 and 89 are pivotally secured to the under side of the under table 86 adjacent to the front of the desk, and are connected by the rods 91 and 92 to the dogs 79.

The rods 83 and 84, and 91 and 92 are mounted in the guides 93 and the dogs 79 and 80 slide in the guides 94, said guides 93 and guides 94 being secured to the under table 86 on the underside, thereby insuring a rigid engagement with the racks 77 and 78.

The slotted pivotal joint is connected by the rod 95 with the operating lever 96, the latter being in rocker arm form, and having a pivoted pin 97 extending from the upper end to a pivotal connection with said rod 95, said in having grooves 98 and 99 in the perip ery thereof where it 1s engaged by the spring 100.

The spring 100 is mounted in the plate 101, through which the pin 97 ro ects, and also through said spring, and t 18 plate 101 forms part of a push rod casing 102 in which the rocker arm, or lever 96 is pivoted.

The push rod 103 is flexibly secured to the upper end of the lever 96, and the push rod 104 is flexibly. secured to the lower end of the lever 96; consequently, on pushmg the upper rod the crank levers8l and 82, and 4 88 and 89 will be swung on their pivots and thereby bring the dogs 79 and 80 into engagement with the racks 77 and 8, while to release them the.lower push rod is operated, and this acts directly on the connecting rods dogs from engagement, the slight-spring pressure on the pins 97 being suificlent to hold the crank levers in one or other of the positions, as the case may be.

The operation of this form of the invention differs materially from the other forms in the fact that the upper panels move verticall instead of swinging inwardly, and in lifting the top boards upwardly, the said boards take the shape of the accounting desk of themselves without other aid, and .naturally when they are lowered they take the flat shape,'as already explained. The compensating weights in the side recesses 111-' sure easy operation in elevatlng the desk,

and as they are, so nearly balanced with the weight of the top and the end panels they make little-or no difference in lowering the desk to its lower level. Furthermore, it must be. noted that in this form of desk the standing height of the desk may be ad usted to suit the person, this doing away with footstools and adjustable seat stools.

The remainder of this form of the deskis shown in the side cabinet 105 moving on casters 106 very similar to those already described, but in addition to this cabinet, I

have shown a fireprdof box 107, which belongs in the recess between the desk top boards 73 and 74 and the under table 86, and

. this box is made of three layers, for the most part, one layer 108 being of wood on the outside, another layer 109 being ofwood on the inside, and in the middle asbestos 1n paper form. This box is covered in by the lid 111, which is joined to the top near the back thereof by a hinge 112, and at the joint the inside is formed of a V-shaped recess 113 in which a fold 114 of the asbestos paper lining is made, the said paper lining continuing to the end of the lid, and preferablv turned over with the end 115, which meets-the front of the box.

In Fig. 23 the form of the invention is an ofiice table having the elevatable top in the In Figs. 24 and 25, the invention is shown as applied to a typewriter desk. There is no change in Fig. 24 beyond the trap-doors" 126 and 127 on one of which -a t pewriter 128 may be mounted and on the other a calculating machine. v

The boxes 129 and 130 are provided'in the under table 131 so that the machines may be used in a sit-down or stand-up position. The desk top 132 is elevated from the and swings the crank levers and releases the frame 133 as already explained and held by the panels 134.

In Fig. 25 the use of a typewriting machineis shown with the accompanying drawer or box frame 135. The lid 136 of the box is thrown back and carries the ma-- chine 137 and the gate legs 138'are swung outwardly to support the reversed lid and ing fully set forth the said invention in its broadest sense.

What I claim is:

.1. A desk-comprising a frame supportedto said cables and approximating the weight of the table and its supports and panels at the ends formin rigid supports for the writing to and l edge in the extreme high position 0 said table top.

2. A desk comprising a-frame supported vfrom the floor at each corner, a table top having a writing section and a ledge vsection hinged together andhaving supports from writing section and ledge projecting downwardly into and vertically slidable in said frame adjacent'to the ends, a plurality of cables engaging said table to .supports at the l wer port ns thereof an passing over aeeaeer pulleys for lifting said writing and said ledge sections of the top, weights attached to said cables and approximating the weight of the table and its supports and end panels shaped to rigidly support the table top at its extreme upper position,the writing section on a slant and the ledge section level.

3. A desk comprising a frame supported from the floor at each corner, a table top having a writing section and a ledge section hinged together and having supports from writing section and ledge projecting downwardly into and vertically slidable in said frame adjacent to the ends, a plurality of cables engaging said table top supports at the lower portions thereof and passing over pulleys for liftin said writing and said ledge sections of t e top, Weights attached to said cables and approximating the weight of the table and its supports and end panels hinged to the frame and having sliding joints connecting them to ledge and writing sections of the table top.

4. A desk comprising a frame supported from the floor at each corner, a table top having a writing section and a ledge section hinged together and having supports from writing section and ledge projecting down wardly into and vertically slidable in said frame adjacent to the ends, a plurality of cables engaging said tabletop supports at the lower portions thereof and passing over pulleys for lifting said writing and said ledge sections of the top, weights attached to said cables and approximating the weight of the table and its supports and panels adapted to lift the table top to its extreme high position in the shape required for a stand desk of slanting writing top and ledge.

5. A desk comprising a frame supported from the floor at each corner, a table top having a writing section and a ledge section hinged together and having supports from writing section and ledge pro'ecting downwardly into and vertically slldable in said frame adjacent to the ends, a plurality of the ledge section having bracket supports I and completing a double standing desk.

6. A desk comprising a frame supported from the floor at each corner, a table top covering in the frame and formed of two sections secured together in a V-joint to insure a flush surface in its flat position and a bend in its raised slanted position, front posts carrying the slanting and writing section ofthe top and rear posts carrying the level and ledge section of the top and vertically slidable in said frame, cables on pulleys attached to said posts, weights attached to said pullays and balancing the top end panels supporting the top in its uppermost position, equalizing rods pivotally connected in pairs, one pair pivotally joining one panel and the frame and the other joining the other panel and the frame, and weights lifting said rods and consequently said panels.

7. A desk comprising a frame standing on suitable corner supports and forming in the top thereof a recessed panel and safe deposit compartment with fireproof lining, a table top lined and closing in said compartment and having post extensions downwardly into said frame, cables and weights balancing said table top, panels lying flat in said compartment in the closed position and rigidly supporting thetop in the standing position of the desk and an inner removable compartment of fireproof construction and contained in said compartment between the panels.

Signed at Montreal, Quebec, Canada, this 20th day of December, 1920.

JOHN MICHAELS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2614017 *Jul 18, 1945Oct 14, 1952Joachim MugnierMultiple table desk
US2733970 *Mar 11, 1954Feb 7, 1956 Vertically adjustable lectern
US4065194 *Mar 18, 1976Dec 27, 1977Mattia Armand DPulpit elevating and lowering system
US4458961 *Jul 27, 1981Jul 10, 1984Jess BrowningComputer terminal work station
US4541675 *Jul 5, 1983Sep 17, 1985Tusco Manufacturing Co.Display canopy
US4682827 *Aug 26, 1985Jul 28, 1987Woodward Eldon DCombination toy box-drafting table
US5205631 *Oct 10, 1991Apr 27, 1993Nova Manufacturing & Assembly, Inc.Platform structure for drawers and working surfaces
US5607212 *Oct 12, 1995Mar 4, 1997Kilpatrick; Ted D.Article of furniture with footrest mounted pivotally to drawer
US20100300331 *Dec 25, 2008Dec 2, 2010Yuan SuComputer desk with a drawer connected with elbow support boards
Classifications
U.S. Classification312/195, 312/312, 312/22, 312/298, 312/194, 109/57, 312/317.2, 312/208.1, 312/271, 312/205, 312/313, 108/11, 312/276
International ClassificationA47B17/00, A47B17/02
Cooperative ClassificationA47B17/02
European ClassificationA47B17/02