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Publication numberUS1403629 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 17, 1922
Filing dateNov 22, 1921
Priority dateAug 12, 1921
Publication numberUS 1403629 A, US 1403629A, US-A-1403629, US1403629 A, US1403629A
InventorsPrice Walter J
Original AssigneePrice Walter J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for imparting a pattern finish to paper and the like
US 1403629 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. J. PRICE.

APPARATUS FOR IMPARTING A PATTERN FINISH T0 PAPER AND THE LIKE.

APPLICATION FILED NOV-22,1921.

1,403,629. Patented Jan. 17,1922.

2 SHEETS-SHEET l- ATTORNEYS W. J. PRICE.

APPARATUS FOR IMPARTING A PATTERN nmsu TO PAPER AND THE LIKE.

APPLICATION FILED NOV. 22. I921- 1,403,629. Patented Jan. 1 22.

2 SHEETS-S INVENTOR BY M,

ATTORNEYS UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

WALTER J. PRICE, OF HOLY XE, MAESAGI'IUSETTS.

APPARATUS FOR IMPARTI'NG A PATTERN FINISH T0 PAPER AND THE LIKE.

Original application filed August 12, 1921, Serial No. 491,773.

vember 22, 1921.

T 0 aZZ whom. it may concern.-

Be it known that I, WALTER J. Pinon, a citizen or the Unlted States, residing at Holyoke, in the county of l-lampden and State of Massachusetts, have invented new and useful Improvements in Apparatus for Impart-ing a Pattern Finish to Paper and the like, of which the following is a specification.

Thi invention relates to improved appr ratus for imparting a pattern finish,such as a linen, fabric or similar tinish,to paper and the like, preferably in a continuous manner. The present application is a division of a cop-ending application Serial No. $91,773, filed August 12, 1921.

Various methods have been proposed heretofore for accomplishing this result, such as endless belts made up of linen or other fabric, between which belts the paper to be finished is passed. The ditli-eulty in this scheme of finishingpaper is in joining the ends or the belt together so as to get a joint of necessary mechanical strength without getting one which will periodically leave its mark on the paper; Another m thod of finishing paper is performed in the socalled embossing machine, wherein the paper is passed between an engraved steel roll and second roll of paper, cotton or the lik further method is to pass the paper between mating rolls, similar to calendar rolls, both of which rolls have patterns formed therein, as for example by cutting.

or engraving rolls which cut the calendar rolls and form the desired patterns therein.

The latter method has not, so far as i can ascertain, proved commercially successful and has not gone into practical use to any appreciable extent due to certain disadvantages, which; seek to overcome by this invention. ll ith the use of two mating calendar rolls, both having patterns, it is exceedingly ditlicult toget the patterns on tae two rolls to exactly register and, it originally exactly in register, it is exceedingly di'iiicult to keep them so. if the two patterns do not register, the condition existing is that of a projection in one roll engaging in a recess of the mating roll, and with this condition paper passed between the rolls will be crimped instead of remaining flat and having the impress of the patterns therein. In

Specification of Letters Patent.

Divided and this application filed No- Serial No. 517,983.

either event, onset the two patterns tends to grind oil" the other, and the rolls have a short useful lite, it being usually necessary to employ an engraving roll in constant cooperation with each calendar roll to insure a proper pattern in them at all times. If, however, the patterns on the two rolls are kept in e ct register, which, as has been stated, is exceedin ly ditiicult, the two rolls it relatively hard will cut into the paper, crush and injure its fiber, making it limp as veil as rough and unsuitable for writing purposes. This same objection also applies to the second method above outlined. The paper will tear readily along the lines where the fibers are cut orcrushed and by the -'"crushing of the fibers the finished paper rapidly absorbs the ink when written upon and causes it to spread much in the same manner as with blotting paper. Ir" the rolls are made setter material, such as paper, so as not to crush and out the fibres, then the condition is that or two somewhat resilient patterns pressing one upon the other and there is too much resiliency to allow of satislactory impress oi: the pattern in the ir *ention has for its general object to or creoine these adverse conditions and render commercially satisfactory that methd of finishing paper which consists essentially in passing it continuously between pressure rolls and impressing in the paper a pattern corresponding to a pattern formed rough, limp sheet,yieldingly compresses the )aper, and thereby does not crush or cut the liber and Since the compression is 7 L .L 1

against a SlllOOth, hard, non-yielding surIace there 1s no crimping of the paper, and the pattern is clearly reproduced therein without an undesirable rough appearance. The finished paper has a desirable transparency in the compressed portions not obtainable by the former methods outlined and presents a satisfactory writing surface.

In conjunction with the pattern-carrying rolls, I may provide a cutting roll for the purpose of forming the pattern therein, or the )atterninay be otherwise formed if desired. The cutting roll does not necessarily require to be in continual engagement with the pattern-carrying roll, as has been heretofore proposed, but may be used intermittently, as and when desired.

Other objects and advantages will appear in the following description and in the illustrative embodiment of the invention in the accompanying drawings, in which,-

Fig. 1 is an exterior elevational view of an apparatus for practising my method of finishing paper and the like;

Fig 2 is t fragmentary sectional elevational view of the principal parts thereof; and

Fig. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary view of the cutting or engraving roller.

Referring to these drawings: a web a of paper, previously dried as distinguished from paper in the process of formation, 1s led from a suitable supply, such as a roll b, between two mating rolls 5 and 6. One of these rolls, as 5, has a smooth surface, and one which is relatively hard and unyielding. This surface may, for example, be made of steel or any other suitable material. The roll 6 has a surface of somewhat softer material and preferably one of some resiliency and may, for example, be constructed of compressed paper (like an ordinary calendar roll), cotton, papier mach, or any other suitable material. It is even possible that a soft metal such aszinc or the like will sullice. The roll 6is the pattern-carrying roll and has a pattern of any desired design formed therein in any suitable manner, either in relief or intaglio; The pattern may be made to simulate linen or any other fabric or may have various other designs thereon, such for example as the more or less conventional design shown at 7 in Fig. 3.

Preferably, I provide a cutting or engraving .roll 7 of relatively hard material, such as steel, or the like, upon the surface of which formed the desired pattern, such.

for example as that just referred to and indicated at 7' in Fig. 3. The diameter of this roll should be a sub-multiple or multiple of the diameter of roll 6. The roll 7, as shown, is in engagementwith roll 6 for the purpose of cutting a pattern therein, but it is not necessarily essential that the rolls 6 and 7 remain in engagement and means, later to be described. are provided for separating them whenever cutting is unnecessary. Furthermore, it is not necessarily essential that the pattern be cut during the process of finishing the paper, although usually it is desired to do so for the purpose of saving time.

The rolls 5 and 7 are mounted for adj ustment relatively to r0116 and means are pro vided for applying pressure upon each of the former to force it against roll 6. As shown, the rolls 5, 6 and 7 are mounted one above the other and supported at their ends in spaced side frames 8. he i earings 9 for rota-tably supporting roll 6 may be lined. on the frame as illustrated, while the bearings 1.0 and 11 for rolls and '7, respectively, are mounted to slide in frame 8 toward or away from roll 6. This mounting is similar to that employed in ordinary calendars and is well understood in the art. Rotatably mounted in each frame 8 is a vertically disposed screw 12 whichis suit-ably engaged with the adjacent bearing 10 so a to move the latter up or down on rotation of the screw. The two screws 12 are connected by bevel gears 13 and a cross-shaft l l, so that a rotation of one will simultaneously and equally move the other and a hand wheel 15 is provided on shaft leifor convenience in turning the screws. Similar screws 16 are )rovided for bearings 11 which screws are connected by bevel gears 1'? and a crossshaft 18, rotatable by a hant wheel 1.9. By turning the latter in the appropriate direction, the roll 7 may be moved out of engagement with roll 6 whenever desired. if

The roll 6 may be driven from any suitable source of power by a pulley 20 (l ig. 2) fixed on the shaft thereof. The letter also carries a gear 2]. with which a gear onthe shaft or roll 7 may be enmeshed, when desired,

the ratio of these gears being such as to drive the rolls 6 and 7 at equal surface speed. Vhile it is not essential for all. purposes to drive roll 5, I" prefer to do so and provide on its shaft a gear 23 to mesh with ar 21. these two gears being likewise proportioned to drive their rollsat equal surface speed. It may he sometimes desirable to clean the pattern-carrying roll 6 and in such cases, I provide suitable means, such as a brush 24f, driven by a. belt 25 and suitable pulleys from roll 6, for this purpose.

Any suitable means may receiving the supply roll i) and guiding the web a into the bight of rolls 5 and 6, as also for winding up the web after it has been finished. As shown, the roll 2') is mounted on an arbor 26, removably supported at its ends in spaced standards 27. From this roll the web a is led to and between rolls 5 and 6, being suit-ably guided, as by idler rolls 28 mounted in and extending between side-frames 29, each of which is supported by and between a side frame 8 and a standard 27. For the purpose of tensioning the paper, and adjustable brakbe provided for i ing device 30, of common form, is pivoted to one standard 27 at 31 and cooperates with a drum 32 on arbor 26. The finished paper is wound up on arbor 33, mounted similarly to arbor 26 in standards This arbor 33 carries a pulley 35 which is driven by a belt 36 from a pulley 37 on roll 6. An idler 38, mounted in the rear frame 8 for adjustment in an obvious manner by the handle 39, engages belt 86. The driving connection for arbor 33 is such as to be capable of turning it with sufficient rapidity at the start of the winding operation and as the paper builds up on the arbor, the idler 38 is adjusted to slacken belt 36 and allow it t0 slip.

The details of the exemplary apparatus heretofore described are not particularly important and may be variedin many ways and still embody my invention, which is concerned essentially with the passage of a strip between two rolls, preferably although not necessarily continuous, one of which carries a pattern and has a resilient surface capable of compressing the paper in conformity to the pattern without cutting it or crushing the fibers and the other of which presents a smooth and relatively harder and unyielding surface.

i believe I am the first to finish paper in the manner just set forth and I desire to claim my invention in the broadest possible legal manner.

.Vhat I claim is,

1. A machine for imparting a pattern finish to paper and the like, comprising, two rolls between which the paper is passed and means to force them toward each other, one of said rolls having a relatively hard and smooth surface and the other a patterned surface of relatively softer material.

2. A machine for imparting a pattern finish t paper and the like, comprising two rolls between which the paper is passed, and means to force them toward each other, one of said rolls having a relatively hard and smooth surface and the other a patterned tern for the purpose of cutti he pattern' M u in the second roll.

4. A machine for imparting a pattern finish to paper and the like, comprising two rolls between which the paper is passed, and means to force them toward each other, one of said rolls having a relatively hard and smooth surface and the other a patterned surface of relatively softer and somewhat resilient material, and means for driving the second and third rolls during the pattern cutting operation at equal surface speeds.

5. A machine for imparting a pattern finish to paper and the like, comprising, two rolls between which the paper is passed and means to force them toward each other, one of said rolls having a relatively hard and smooth surface and the other .a patterned surface of relatively softer material, and means cooperating with the second roll to clean the surface of the latter.

6. A machine 'for imparting a pattern finish to paper and the like, comprising two rolls between which the paper is passed and means to force them toward each other, one of said rolls having a relatively hard and smooth surface and the other a patterned surface of relatively softer material, and a rotatable brush cooperating with the patterned surface of the second roll.

In testimony whereof I have afix d my signature.

WALTER J. Pm

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7799176 *Oct 8, 2007Sep 21, 2010Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US8287694Aug 17, 2010Oct 16, 2012Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US8535481 *Jun 13, 2012Sep 17, 2013Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US20120248650 *Jun 13, 2012Oct 4, 2012Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
Classifications
U.S. Classification101/23
International ClassificationB31F1/07, B31F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationD21H5/06, D21H27/02
European ClassificationD21H27/02, D21H5/06