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Publication numberUS1406510 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 14, 1922
Filing dateOct 26, 1920
Priority dateJul 25, 1919
Also published asDE348388C
Publication numberUS 1406510 A, US 1406510A, US-A-1406510, US1406510 A, US1406510A
InventorsWeber Louis
Original AssigneeSiemens Schuckertwerke Gmbh
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Auricular telpehone
US 1406510 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

L. WEBER.

AURICULAR TELEPHONE. APPLICATION FILED OCT. 26, 1920.

1,406,510. Patentd Feb. 14, 1922*.

; UNITED STATES j PATENT OFFICE.

LoUIs WEBER, or cnannor'rnnmme, GERMANY, ASSIGNOR TO smmnns-scntuoxnnr. wnaxn onsnmscmr mr'r BESCERKNKTERHAFTUNG, or srmmnssrmr, 1m 3mm, GERMANY, A GERMAN CORPORATION.

aunrcumn 'rnnrnnonn Specification of Letters Yatent.

Patented Feb. 14, 1922.

Application filed October 26, 1920. Serial No. 419,780.

matter have been filed ,1) me' in the following foreign countries: erman July 24th, 1919, Ser. No. 50,646; Hollan Jul 16th, Ser. No. 15,640; Sweden, Ju y 6th, 1920, Ser. No. 3,926/20; Italy, July 23rd, 1920,.Ser. 293/52; Switzerland, July 5th, 1920, Patent No. 92,011; England, July 26th, 1920, Patent No. 149,621; Poland, July 24th, 1920, Ser. No. 11,944; Spain, February 19th, 1921, patent granted June 7th, 1921, No. 77,136; France, March 1st, 1921, patent granted October 25th, 1921, No. 531,513; Austria, July 8th, 1920, Ser. No. 3,729-20; Czecho-Slovakia, July 22nd, 1920, Ser. No.

, 1 6094-20; Ju'go-Slovakia, March 29th,

1921, Ser. No. 435/21; Belgium, March 3rd, 1921, Ser. No. 235,508; and Hungary, March 14th, 1921, Ser. No. 4,323,

My invention refers to telephone receivers, and more especially to telephone receivers which. can be inserted in the auditory duct.

It has been suggested to make telephones, especially such for people who are hard of hearing, in the shape ofa cartridge to be inserted in the auditory duct. In realizing this suggestion in practice it was found that these telephones could not be manufactured small enough to allow of their being accommodated entirely within the auditory duct, a considerable portion of the apparatus projecting from the auditory duct, so that it yvas necessary to fix this projecting portion "in position by means of fastening devices,

such as, for instance, hooks to be laid around the auricle, in order to prevent the wholetelephone apparatus from slipping out of the auditory duct. Moreover it has been proposed to design auricular telephones of so small a size that they could be accommodated approximately in the central part of the auricle, whilst projecting into the auditory duct with an elongation. In this case the fastening is intended to be achieved by the part to be inserted in the auditory duct being provided with a ball of cotton or t hglike, wound around the elongation and fitting as tightly as-possible into the auditory duct. This method of fastening is, however, uncomfortable and unhygenic and moreover exerts a pernicious pressure on the auditory duct.

According to my invention, the above disadvantages are avoided by giving thetelephone a substantially L-shaped contour, the arm intended for the auditory duct containing the telephone diaphragm as well as the magnet coils, whilst the magnet is arranged in the other arm. The distribution of weight is suitably arranged in such a manner that the centre of gravity of'the whole telephone is located in the part to be inserted in the auditory duct. I

In the drawings affixed to this specification and forming part thereof a device embodying my invention is illustrated by way of example. In the drawings- Fig. 1 is a section of wear and auditory duct showing the manner in which the telephone is fastended in the ear.

, Fig. 2 is a back view of the apparatus with the closing cap removed.

Fig. 3 is a cross-section of the apparatus.

Fig. 4 is a front view of the apparatus with the ear piece and diaphragm removed.

Fig. 5 is a modification of a detail.

Fig. 6 is a longitudinal section through the middle portion of the telephone in larger scale.

Fig. 1 of the drawings illustrate the man-. nor in which the telephone is fixed in the ear. The horizontal part which is provided with an oval or olive shaped ear piece, is inserted in the auditory duct proper; the vertical part to which the connections are attache'd, fits into the incisura intertragica and lies up against the lobe of the car. In consequence of the telephone being adapted to the anatomical structure of the ear, the apparatus clings to the ear without further holding means and with such firmness that the possibility of the apparatus dropping out is remote even if a certain amount of tension be exerted on the attached conductin wires.

'igs. 2 to 4 of the drawings illustrate the construction of the telephone on an enlarged scale. 7

The telephone is containedin a casin of non-magnetic material, such as brass. casing consists of a cylindrical chamber 1,

. drical chamber.

followed by an oblong prismatic chamber 2 of rectan lar cross-section. A U-shaped magnet 3 is provided in the prismatic chamber, whilst the pole shoes 4 bearing the magnet coils 5 are contained in the cylin- Extensions 7 of the pole shoes project through slots inthe back wall or partition 6 of the chamber 1 and into the back chamber where they touch against the sides of the upper ends of the U-shaped magnet 3. Screws 8 which rigidly press the casing, the extensions 7 and the magnet against one another and keep these parts in their relative positions, are screwed through the casing from the outside. Underneath the magnet 3 a small block 9 f insulating material is arranged in the cham her 2, the said block being-provided with small screws 10 for connecting the interior wiring with the exterior wiring 11. The wiring 11 is taken through a slotted bushing 12 which is compressed by means of a cap nut 13 in such a manner as to keep the wiring 11 rigidly in position. The inner wiring extends from the chamber 2, the open back of which is closed by means of a cover 15 fastened by screws and reaches the cylindrical front part 1 through a boring 1 1.

As will be noted more particularly from Fig. 6, a small iron disc 16 serving as the armature is arranged opposite the pole shoes 4, this disc being fastened to a dlaphragm of gold-beaters skin 17 or other membranous material suitable for this purpose. The diaphragm is tautened by means of a cylindrical plug 18 inserted in a socket-like element 19 which is threaded onto chamber 1. This socket is followed by an ear piece 20 of ebonite or some othersuitable material, which is inserted in the auditory duct. In order to fix socket 1%) bearing the diaphragm. in various positions relatively to the chamher 1, a lock-nut 21 is screwed against .the end of 1 socket 19. The releasing and readjusting of the screw arrangement offers a very handy means for adjusting the distance between the diaphragm and the pole shoes so as to provide the de ree of sensitiveness required for the individual cases. In order to protect the diaphragm against being damaged by pressing it against the pole shoes in the courseof such an ad- 1 justment, an abutment 22 isprovided which revents the lock nut 21 from being screwed ack too far. By this adustabilit of the telephone it becomes possi Is to adiust the apparatus to suit the degree of sensitiveness of the ear when the instrument is used by persons su'fiering from hardness of hearing. The olive shaped earpiece 20 is attached to the diaphragm carrier 18 by means of a screw stud 23 so that it can easily be exchanged. By' this means a wide adaptation to the varying anatomic conditions of differently shaped cars is ensured; an ear piece shaped to suit the ear according to whether the auditory duct possesses a larger or smaller diameter may thus be screwed on position to which it is adjusted, by this pawl and notch locking device. This device renders the readjusting of the diaphragm still easier than in the case of the arrangement illustrated in Fig. 8. An abutment 22 in this case also prevents the diaphragm from being damaged.

I claim:

1. In a telephone receiver, the combination of an L'-shaped casing, one arm of said casing being adapted to be inserted in the auditory duct, a telephone diaphragm and excitatlon coils both arranged in said arm and a permanent magnet arranged in the other arm.

2. In a telephone receiver, the combination.

of an L-shaped casing of non-magnetic material, one arm of said casing having substantially circular, the other arm having rectangular cross section, a telephone diaphragm, excitation coils and pole-shoes arranged within said arm of circular cross section and a U-shaped permanent magnet in said arm of rectangular cross section.

3. In a telephone receIVer, the combmation of an L-shaped casing of non-magnetic material, one arm of said casing having substantially circular, thebther arm having rectangular cross section, a slotted partition subdividing the said casing in two chambers, each one arranged in one of said arms, a telephone diaphragm, excitation coils and pole-shoes disposed Within the chamber in said arm of circular cross section, a U-shaped permanent magnet arranged in the chamber in said arm of rectangular cross section, said pole-shoes bearing salcl excitation coils and means connecting the rear ends of said poleshoes and the ends of said magnet tothe walls of said casing. r

4. In a telephone receiver, the combination of an L shaped casing of non-magnetic extending through said slotted partition, and

5. In a telephone receiver, the combination of an L-shaped casing, one arm of said casing being adapted to be inserted in the auditory duct, a telephone diaphragm and excitation coils both arranged in said arm, and a permanent magnet arranged in the other arm of said casing, the weight being distributedin such a manner that the center of gravity lies in the arm to be inserted in the auditory duct.

6. In a telephone receiver, the combination of'an L-shaped casing, one arm of said casing being adapted to be inserted in the auditory duct, membranous material arranged in said arm, an iron armature secured to said diaphragm, excitation coils and pole-shoes in said arm adjacent to said armature, and a permanentmagnet, attached to said pole-shoes, in the other arm.

7. In a telephone receiver, the combination of an L-shaped casing of non-magnetic material, one arm of said casing being adapted to be inserted in the auditory duct, poleshoes and excitation coils arranged in said arm, a telephone diaphragm in said arm adjustably arranged relatively to said poleshoes and a U-shaped magnet arranged in the other arm of said casing and connected with said pole-shoes.

8. In a telephone receiver, the combination of an L-shaped casing of non-magnetic material, one arm of said casing being adapted to be inserted in the auditory duct, poleshoes and excitation coils arranged in said arm, a telephone diaphragm in said arm adjustably arranged relatively to said poleshoes, an abutment preventing the moving of said diaphragm against said pole-shoes below a predetermined limit, and 'magnet arranged in the other a. telephone diaphragm of an U-shaped arm of said casing and connected with said pole-shoes.

9. n a telephone receiver, the combination of an L-shaped casing, one of its arms hayin cylindrical form and being adapted to be inserted in the auditory duct, the other arm having rectangular form, pole-shoes and excitation coils thereon disposed in said cylindrical arm and a U-shaped magnet in said rectangular arm connected to said pole-shoes, said cylindrical arm having a socket threaded to it, a diaphragm fastened in said socket and adjustable relatively to said pole-shoes by the turning of said threaded socket, means for limiting the extent of said adjustment and an ear piece remo-vably attached to said socket and operatively connected with said diaphragm.

10. In a telephone receiver, the combination of an L-shaped casing, one of its arms having cylindrical form and being adapted to be inserted in the auditory duct, the other arm having rectangular form, pole-shoes and excitation coils thereon disposed in said cylindrical arm and a U-shaped magnet in said rectangular arm connected to said pole-shoes, said cylindrical arm having a socket threaded to 1t, a diaphragm fastened in said socket and adjustable relatively to said pole-shoes by the turning of said threaded socket, means for limiting the extent of said adjustment and an ear piece removably attached to said socket and operatively connected with said diaphragm the center of gravity of the entire casing being located in its cylindrical arm.

In testimony whereof I afiix m LOUIS si nature.

E ER,

Classifications
U.S. Classification381/380, 381/417, 381/328
International ClassificationH04R25/02
Cooperative ClassificationH04R25/65
European ClassificationH04R25/65