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Publication numberUS1406951 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 14, 1922
Filing dateOct 23, 1920
Priority dateOct 23, 1920
Publication numberUS 1406951 A, US 1406951A, US-A-1406951, US1406951 A, US1406951A
InventorsFrank Fehr
Original AssigneeFrank Fehr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Elevator-hatchway seal
US 1406951 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. FEHR.

ELEVATOR HATCHWAY SEAL.

APPLICATION FILED OCT. 23. 1920. I 1 406,951 Patented Feb. 14, 1922.

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I ELEVATOR HATCHWAY SEAL.

APPLICATION FILED OCT. 23, I920.

Patented Feb. 14, 1922.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 3- YIIIIA-II- I/II/ w 1mm.- 21ml ////%IEIHI W l i FRANK'FEHR, or LOUISVILLE? KENTUCKY. 1

ELEVATOR-HATCHWAY SEAL. I

To all/whom it may] concern Be it known that I, FRANK FEHR, a citizen of the United States, residing at Louisville, in the county of Jefferson and State of Kentucky, have invented certainenewand useful Improvements in Elevator Hatchway Seals, of whichv the following is a specification. v

T he invention relates to elevator installations in building construction. i

it is frequently necessary in housing certain classes of business that the building be constructed so that rooms on-dilierent floors, or whole floors, may be sealed from the remainder 01 the building and from the outside atmosphere. At the same time it is necessary to provide communication with elevator service for the movement of goods or the passage of persons. It may be desirable to segregate portions oi a build ing so that noxious odors, dust or other undesirable by-products incident to industrial processes can be confined therein. The even maintenance of highten'iperatures in drying rooms wherein materials are being constantlv movedv to and from an elevator is frequently required.

In cold-storage warehouses the'maintenance of uniform temperatures is'partic'ularlv essential to the preservation oi perishable goods, and to that end the rooms and floors are provided with communicating doors which effect an air seal when closed.

in using an elevator'ioimthe movement of goods in and out of a cold storage warehouse and between floors; it is of course necessary to open the hatchway doors. In the usual construction of elevator installations, the shaft acts as a line to create a circulation air through the door openings when in use. The, resultant disturbance of temperatures in refrigerated rooms not otherwise protected is obviously consid erable and objectionable. lnorder to avoid the escape of cold from the refrigerated rooms through the doors when opened to allow passage into or out 0t an elevator it'has been customary to construct cold-storage buildings with closed Specification of Letters Patent. Patented F b. 14 Application filed Qccober 23, 1929. Serial No. 419,067;

vestibules at the 'doorsleadinginto the elevator hatchways, the vestibule door being closed before the hatchway door is-opened so.-

as to minimize the escapeof cold air. These vestibules however. take up considerable space; which but for their presence could be used for storage. p I y lit-1s one of the general aims of my inventlon to produce an improved construction eliminates the necessity for vestibules and at the Same time effectively prevents the flow of currents of air between an elevator. hatch-v the edges of the car opening and the shaft walls about the hatchway door so that air cannot flow through such spaces when the.

elevator is, in register. with aihatchway door.

Another ob ect of my invention is topro- 'vide "means which is automatic in its operation and does not require the; attention of theoperator to effect a seal when the car is positioned before the door opening. 7

A;' further object is to provide sealing means of great durability, and of simple construction which may be cheaply manufactured and installed on standard types of elevators.

The objects of the invention thus generally stated, together with other obiects and advantages which will be apparent as the description proceeds, are attained by the cons ruction and arrangement hereinafter desc rhed and illustrated in the accompany ing drawings. forming part hereof.

Fig. l of? the drawingsis a fragmentary sectionalelevation of a building constructed with an elevator hatchwa-y within a walled shaft and equipped with anelevator car and operating meanstherefor. The car and shaft are shown in section as taken on the ,for cold-storage and other buildings which Fig.2.

' cated by the! line 2-2 in Fig.

Fig. 3 illustrates in vertical cross section the means employed .to seal the spaces between the top and bottom of the car and the shaft wall adjacent tothe door opening.

Fig. 4 is a cross sectional view of my device adapted to seal the lateral spaces between the carand wall, and also shows a fragmentary plan View of theconstruction illustrated in Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 illustrates in cross section a modi- 1 fied construction of the means employed to seal the lateral spaces.

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary side view of the device constructed as illustrated in Fig. 5, and showingbroken sections representing the top, bottom and an intermediate portion of the car.

In the embodiment of my invention selected for illustration, referring now to F igsk 1 and 2, the numeral 5 indicates the foundation of a building from which .rise the" walls 6 and 7 forming respectively the front and rear walls of an elevator shaft enclosing one or more hatchways." The several floors of the building are indicated at 8. Opening from each floor into the elevator shaft are doors 9 formed in the wall 6. An elevator car 10.0perates within the shaft, and travels upon the guide rails 11 suitably securedat the sides of its 'hatchw'ay, and with which the car is engaged by means of some one ofthe well known safety devices adapted to that purpose. A cable 12, attached to the top of the car, passes over a sheave 13 and is wound upon revolving drum 14. Driving mechanism, including power means controlled by the elevator operator, is indicated generally at 15, and serves to actuate the drum 14 and the cable 12 by which the car '10 is raised and lowered in the shaft.

' A counterweight 16 (Fig. 2) is arranged 1n a well known manner to counterbalance the weight offthe car 10.

The car is constructed with its side and rear walls, and also its top and floor, closed to the circulation of air, the front of the car which faces the hatchway doors 9 being open.

It will be seen that between the front of the car 10 and the wall 6 there must be operating clearance to permit the passage of the car in the .hatchway. The clearance allowedin practice is sullicient to permit a largeyvolume of air to pass between the ad'- j'oining rooms of the building and the shaft when the car ispositioned before one the openings and the doors opened to handle freight from the elevator; a condition here- 'tofore, requiring the construction of spaceconsuming vestibules with double sets of doors.

To prevent that action I have mounted flexible strips about the four sides of the front face of the car 10 which extend forwardly to engage outstanding elements fixed to the wall 6 surrounding the door openings, and which cooperatively form an air seal about the front face of the car when it is positioned before one of the openings.

My preferred 7 construction to accomplish this seal comprises rails 17 (Figs. 1 and 4), preferably being standard guide rails, fixed in'vertical position upon the wall 6, one on each side of and adjacent to the openings 9,

a and extending continuously the entire length of the hatchway. Immediately above and below each ofthe door openings is mounted a cross member 18 extending between the side rails 17 and projecting into the hatchway. The surface of the cross member is inclined toward the wall at its upper and lower edges.

Angular supporting brackets 19 (Figs. 1 and 2) are suitably secured on each side of the car 10 near and parallel to the edges of its front face and extending a substantial distance above and below the car frame. The sealing devices mounted thereon on each side of the. car being identical in construction, only one will be described as illustrated in Fig. 4. Carried at intervals on the front face of the bracket 19 are filler blocks 20 to which are. attached an angle plate 21 extending along the length of the bracket 19, and mountedwith its angle projecting forwardly. 'Secured oppositely on the angular faces of the plate 21 is a pair of flexible strips 22 running longitudinally of, the plate, and with their front edges extending substantially forward ofthe front face of the car to engage between them the outstanding tongue of the rail 17. The strips 22 are maintained in yi lding contact with the rail by means ofa spring member 23 overlying each of the strips 22 throughout their length and .detachablysecured along the rearward edges of the strips to the plate 21, as by means of cap screws 24 passing through the strips. The spring members also serve as clamps to hold the flexible strips in place.

The .strips 22 being of considerably greater width than. the faces of their support and being mounted 1n spaced angular relation I have found'that standard leather belting gives satisfactory results in use as such strips.

It will thus be seen that the lateral spaces between the car 10 and the wall 6areclosed against air, circulation therethrough, and thatthe construction'just described permits of'the movement of the elevator through its hatchway with the flexible strips constantly and automatically performing their function in their sl ding engagement with the cooperating rails.

Across the top and the bottom of the car The resilient construction of the strips permits them to yield, slidably pass over the convex plates in either direction, and return to normal posit-ion. hen the car is stopped before one of the doors the strips remain in contact with the plate mounted oppositely. The strips 22 are formed to extend substantially in complete closure between the upper and lower projections of the lateral strips 22.

For the adjustment of the relative position of the flexible strips above and below the car to compensate for Wear, base plates 25 (F are fixed upon the top and the bottom of the car, and carry the supporting brackets 19 Transverse slots 26 areformed in each of the brackets 19" through which securing; bolts 27 are engaged with the plate 25. .As the flexible strips wear, the support may be moved forward to efiect proper con tact between the strips22 and, the cooperating convex plates 18.

In the modified construct-ion of the side scalin g device illustrated in Figs. 5' and 6, an angular supporting bracket 19 '1s earned on each side of the car 10: adjacent. to its front face. An angle plate 21*, coextensive in length with the support 19*, is secured thereto along one of its faces, by means of bolts 27" carried by the support and passing through elongated slots 26 in the angle plate 21" to permit lateral adjustment of the latter relative to the car. On the opposite web of the angle plate 91*, which extends forwardly and parallel to the side of the car, is securcda pair of flexible strips 2? running longitudinally of the plate. The strips are mounted in spaced parallel relation, their reari-vard edges being separated. by spacer block 20" and attached to the plate 21 by means of bolts 24 The forward edges of the strips extend frontward to embrace the tongue of the rail 17 secured to the wall of the shaft; Contact between the strips and the rails is vicldingly maintained by a plurality of clamping elements 23 carried by the flexible strips and spaced along their for ard edge. Mounted oppositely on the cr faces of the strips, the clamping elements are positioned with their inner edges overlying the center portions-of the strips:

whereat spacer pieces 28 are secured between the strips; and with their outeredges overlying the forward edges of the strips which embrace the rail. A bolt 23 passes through the clamping elements and strips and has its head bearing upon one of the clamping elements. A coiled spring 23 is mounted on the extended end of the bolt and tensioned between the nut 23 and the other of the clamping elements, thus tending to yieldingly draw the latter together and thereby maintain contact between the strips and the rail in their sliding engagement.

it will now be apparent that when the car 10 is positioned on a level with either of the building floors in register with one of the door openings 9, a complete seal is eiiectcd, closing the spaces surrounding the front face of the car. In that position the flexible strips above and below the carare in contact with the oppositely positioned convex mem- I bers fixed about the door, and, with the constantly engaged lateralstrips, accomplish the prevention of any air circulation between the hatchway and the open doors. It will also be apparent that by the use of my invention the objectionable vestibules now commonly in usemay be discarded. It will be further obvious that the action of the sealing devices is wholly automatic and'needs no attendance by an operator. The principal elements are of standard fabricated materials providing cheapness of construction, and their design assures durability in service. It is further apparent thatmy invention may be adapted to seal floor hatches in elevator construction. 1

While I have illustrated and described in detail a preferred embodiment. of iny inven tion it should be clearly understood that the disclosure is merely for purposes of illustration andthat many modifications'and variations will naturally occur to those skilled in the art. I aim in the subjoined claims to cover all such legitimate variations and modifications.

I claim as my invention:

1, In a building having a plurality of floors, the combination of an elevator car operating in a hatchw'ay'having openings at said floors, and cooperative means associated with said car and said openings to prevent the circulation of air between either of said openings selectively and said hatchway, said means effecting a continuous closure between the sides of said car and said hatchway and an interrupted closure between the top and bottom of said car and'said hatchway.

2. In a building having a plurality of floors, the combination of an elevator hatchway having awall with openings framed therein at said floors, an elevator car operable in said'hatchway, means for continuously sealing the spaces between the sides of said car and said wall, and intermittently operative means for sealing the spaces between the upper and lower portions of the car and the wall immediately above and below said openings, to prevent the circulation of air between the opening and said hatchway.

3. In an elevator installation the combination of a hatchway having spaced door openings therein, a car operating in the hatchway, and means for selectively sealing said door openings from communication with said hatchway when said car is registered therewith, said means including continuous vertical members mounted in said hatchway laterally of said door openings, elements carried on the sides of said car having continuous overlapping sliding engagement with said members, and sealing devices severally mounted above and below said car and door openings adapted when registered to effect a closure between said vertical members.

4. In an elevator installation having a hatchway, the combination of an elevator car operating in said hatchway, a series of door openings framed in one of the walls defining said hatchway, a pair of outstanding continuous rails fixed tosaid wall and positioned one at each side of said series of openings in parallel relation to the direction of movement of said car, pairs of cross plates having outstanding surfaces and ex tending between said rails, one plate fixed above and one below each of said openings, a d means carried by said car to engage with said rails and cross plates and substantially seal said hatchway against atmospheric communication with either of said openings selectively.

In an elevator installation having a hatchway, the combination of a wall defining a side of said hatchway and having a series of vertically arranged spaced door o 'ienings framed therein, an elevator car operating in said hatchway and having its face successively in register with said openings, forwardly extending flexible strips mounted about and surrounding the face of said car, and means secured to said wall about said door openings to engage selectlvely said flexible SiLI'lPSWllGIl the, face of said car is in register with one of said openings and thereby prevent the circulation of air between the opening and the hatchway.

6. The combination with an elevator car operable to selectively register with a plurality of hatchway doors, of pairs of resilient strips mounted on the car, one pair across the top and another pair across the bottom of the door of the car and extending forwardly therefrom,'the strips of each pair be ing angularly disposed relative to each other and stressed so that their forwardly extendpositioned in register with a hatchway door,

and means for sealing the spaces between the car and hatchway wall at the sides of said doors.

7 The combination with an elevator car operable to successively register with a plurality of hatchway doors, of a pair of pliable strips secured to each side of said car adjacent to its face and extending forwardly therefrom, said strips of each pair being disposed in spaced relation to each other and stressed so that their forwardly extended edges tend to meet, and vertically extending elements fixed in relation to said hatchway doors one on each side thereof and located forwardly of said pairs of strips, each of said elements having an outstanding tongue interposed between and in sliding contact with the forward portions of the adjacent pair. of said strips.

8. In a device of the class described, the

combination of an elevator car operating in a hatchway having a door opening, a support mounted on said car parallel to the vertical sides of its front face, a pair of spaced pliable elements attached to said support and extending forwardly of said car, a rail fixed in said hatchway at one' side of said opening and having an outstanding tongue, said tongue being interposed in sliding engagement between said elements, and a plurality of spring stressed clamping members associated with said elements tending to force together the forward portions thereof and yieldingly maintain them in contact'with said rail.

9. In a device of the class'described, the combination of an elevator car operating in a hatchway having a door opening, a support adjustably mounted on said car parallel to the horizontal sides of its front face, a pair of spaced pliable elements attached to'said support and extending forwardly of said car, a pair of spring members associated with said elements tending to force together the forward portions of said elements and yieldingly maintain them in normally extended position, and a horiontallypositioned plate fixed in said hatchway adjacent to said opening, said plate being shaped with an outstanding portion having a curved vertical cross section and adapted to be slidably engaged by said pliable elements.

10. In an'elevator installation having a hatchway, the combination of an elevator car operating in said hatchway, a series of door openings framed in one of the Walls the spaces between the sides ofsaid car and defining said hatchway, a pair of outstandsaid Wall, and means for sealing the spaces i'ng continuous rails fixed to said wall and between said car and said wall at the top 10 positioned one at each side of said series and bottom of said doors. of openings and parallel with the direction In testimony whereof, I have hereunto of movement of said car, means carried by set my hand. 7 4

said car and engaging with said rails to seal FRANK FEHR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3945468 *Dec 11, 1974Mar 23, 1976Hitachi, Ltd.Sound preventive device for use in elevator
US4058191 *Oct 6, 1976Nov 15, 1977Westinghouse Electric CorporationElevator system including an elevator car having door operated sealing devices adjacent door opening
US4709787 *Jul 14, 1986Dec 1, 1987Eiji UchinoElevator
US4735293 *Dec 1, 1986Apr 5, 1988Westinghouse Electric Corp.Hatchway door for elevator system
US5836424 *Oct 18, 1996Nov 17, 1998Allen; Thomas H.Multiple level building with elevator hoistway seal structure
US5899303 *Oct 22, 1997May 4, 1999Allen; Thomas H.Hoistway door seal structure
US6330763Sep 10, 1999Dec 18, 2001Rite-Hite Holding CorporationTranslating door with disengageable seals
US6352097Sep 10, 1999Mar 5, 2002Rite-Hite Holding CorporationMulti-panel door with an auxiliary drive mechanism
US6360487Sep 10, 1999Mar 26, 2002Rite-Hite Holding CorporationResilient door panel
US6923238Nov 13, 2001Aug 2, 2005Rite-Hite Holding CorporationMulti-panel door with an auxiliary drive mechanism
US7510055 *May 12, 2003Mar 31, 2009Toyo Shutter Co., Ltd.Door device of elevator
US7584825 *Aug 15, 2005Sep 8, 2009Toshiba Elevator Kabushiki KaishaSealing device for elevator
US7757437Jan 9, 2004Jul 20, 2010Rite-Hite Holding CorporationResilient retention system for a door panel
US7921970Mar 20, 2009Apr 12, 2011Toshiba Elevator Kabushiki KaishaSealing device for elevator
US7958972Mar 20, 2009Jun 14, 2011Toshiba Elevator Kabushiki KaishaSealing device for elevator
US8167020Mar 2, 2009May 1, 2012Rite-Hite Holding CorporationUpper seal for a horizontal side-moving door
US8733024Jul 30, 2010May 27, 2014Jamison Door CompanyFlexible door with rigid insulation
US20040206004 *May 3, 2004Oct 21, 2004Walenty KalempaSeal for a bi-parting door
US20040206581 *Apr 16, 2003Oct 21, 2004Baumann Matthew D.Sill shield
US20050269038 *Aug 15, 2005Dec 8, 2005Toshiba Elevator Kabushiki KaishaSealing device for elevator
US20060175147 *May 12, 2003Aug 10, 2006Toyo Shutter Co., Ltd..Door device of elevator
US20060191749 *Mar 30, 2006Aug 31, 2006Koyu SasakiHall door apparatus of elevator
US20090178341 *Mar 20, 2009Jul 16, 2009Toshiba Elevator Kabushiki KaishaSealing device for elevator
US20090178342 *Mar 20, 2009Jul 16, 2009Toshiba Elevator Kabushiki KaishaSealing device for elevator
US20110011003 *Jul 30, 2010Jan 20, 2011Vogel Lynn DFlexible door with rigid insulation
EP0447609A1 *Sep 12, 1990Sep 25, 1991Otis Elevator CompanyReduction of noise and vibration in an elevator car by selectively reducing air turbulence
Classifications
U.S. Classification187/400, 187/406
International ClassificationB66B13/30
Cooperative ClassificationB66B13/30, B66B13/308
European ClassificationB66B13/30H, B66B13/30