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Publication numberUS1408283 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 28, 1922
Filing dateMar 24, 1921
Priority dateMar 24, 1921
Publication numberUS 1408283 A, US 1408283A, US-A-1408283, US1408283 A, US1408283A
InventorsFerdon Guy W
Original AssigneeFerdon Guy W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roller-towel cabinet
US 1408283 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

G. W. PERDON.

ROLLER TOWEL CAB|NEL -PPLICATION FILE!) MARl 241 1921. 1.4.08,283.

Patented Feb.,28, 1922.

G. w. PERDON. ROLLER TOWEL CABINET.l APPLICATION FILED MA-R; 24| 192i? Patented Feb. 2s, 1922.

s SHEETS-SHEET 2.

G. W. FERDON.V

ROLLER TOWEL CABINET.

- APPLICATION FILED MAR=24.1921.

1,408,283, Peeented Feb. 28, 1922.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

' 5 Gig feraz.

UNITED STATES PATENT oFFlcE.

- GUY W. FERDON, F CRESSKILL, NEW JERSEY.

ROLLER-TOWEL CABINET.

To all whom t may concern.:

Be it known that I, GUY W. FnRDoN, a citizen of the United States, residing at Cresskill, county of Bergen, and State of New Jersey, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in a Roller-Towel Cabinet;

and I do hereby declare `the following toY be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to. make and use the same.

My invention relates to a towel cabinet particularly of the type called a roller towelv cabinet. Inthese cabinets an indefinite length of toweling is supplied on a clean towel roller in a receptacle or case and passed thence, after it has been soiled by use, to another roller whereon it is wound for washing or renewal. These rollers may be interchangeable and the soiled towel compartment is provided with means whereby the toweling is kept from view and seppreviously soiled toweling, thus exposing a wipe or use.

In most places, at least in this country, the boards of health prohibit the use of the so-called old style continuous rollerl towel of the type that is in common domestic use in kitchens. This prohibition is based upon the fact that a roller towel soon` has its clean surface exhausted. by the users and then, of course, may become unsanitary and section of clean toweling sufiicient for a dangerous for further use. lTo obviate this many continuous roller towel cabinets have been devised most, if not all, of lwhich rely upon the use of numerous rolls and pulleys, measuring devices, and other means toinsure a sectionof clean toweling. Sometimes frictionsurfaces of sand paper, emery, etc., are used which have an injurious and wearing effect upon the towel. This is detrimental to the towel or cabinet, thewall or Specification of Letters Patent. -Patented Feb. 28 1922.

Application filed March 24, 1921.

Serial No. 455,063.

surface to which the cabinet is attached and, of course, to the temperament and nerves of the user, with the result that they are unsatlsfactory in actual public use and not commerclally successful on a large scale. My roller towel cabinet is novel 'in shape, inexpensive and easy to operate because of the few parts employed in its make up and its slmple operation. Sometimes the soiled towels are` exposed to repeated use by allowing a looped end f soiled towel to hang from the cabinetv and are liable to spread contaglon from the soiled exposed portion even, when it is not directly used. Anyone who has observed the character of many of the persons who resort to the .use of public lavatories, and as noted particularly in those of the lower sort, the character of diseases they suffer from, must realize the danger of contagion thus arising and the consequent spread of scrofulous and infectiou's diseases generally.

I aim to provide a towel cabinet in which F ig. l.

Fig. 4 is a section on the line 4-4 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 5 is a vertical section on the line '5-5 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 6 is a sectional view of my cabinet lookingat it from the right side,the section y.

being along the vline 6-6 of Fig. 1, and looking to the left.`

'Figx 7 .is a detail showing a mounting of the clean towel roller axle.

Fig. 8 shows the same thing in connection with a stop.`

Fig. 9 shows the'lnounting of the windlass roller.

Fig. 1() shows the means for securing the latter in place.

Fig. 11 shows the latch also for holding the windlassy roller. i

, front of the cabinet.

Fig. 17 is a side view of one modification looking from the right side; and Fig. 18 is a side View of still another modification looking from the right side.

In the drawing, l represents the cabinet, which consists, as shown, of a closed upper casing 2 or compartment and a closed lower casing 3. Between these two casings' or compartments is on open space, which I have indicated by 4, produced by cutting away the side walls 5 so as to allow ready access to the strip of toweling 6. These side walls mays be omitted entirely at this point, as is indicated in the form shown in Fig. 17. I preferably use a crescent or semicircular shaped recess, which allows freedom 'of action in use and also acts as a measuring device by pushing the towel surface against it when more than the usual amount of clean towel lsurface is desired.

In the uppercasing or cabinet I provide a rod or roller 7 upon which `is wound a length of clean toweling 6. This toweling may be, say 25 yards to 100 yards long, and the toweling 6 is made to pass from the upper roller about the lower roller 8 on which lower roller it is wound by a windlass 9.V The upper cabinet .is closed by a door 10 which may be held in place by suitable latches 11, and the lower casing is closed by a door-12 also held in place when turned in position by suitable latches. The toweling passes out of the upper casing through a narrow slot formed by the crescent shaped part and the cover indicated at 13 and into the lower casing through another slot 14 also formed by the crescent shaped part and the cover whereby it is kept, the clean toweling from contamination by the atmosphere, and the soiled toweling from spreading contagion generally, and the soiled towehng is also kept apart entirely from the clean toweling.

The material of the cabinet is preferably sheet metal, such as galvanized iron, enameled tin, etc. It may be, of course, copper or nickel, or wood or paperboard, or any other suitable material, and may be suitably painted and decorated. The toweling may be united to the upper roller or lower roller, or both, by a row of teeth, notshown, or by gummed paper or by being passed through a slot in the roller, or other suitable attach- The cabinet is intended to be suspended with' the clean towel compartment or casing above, though it may be used with the rollers 7 and 8 in vertically adjusted position, or it may be laid flat upon a table, the latter being perhaps the preferable position when the device is to be used by children. The depres- A towel.

I unite lto the upper roll, preferably on the left side as shown, a disk 15 in which are a number of regularly spaced openings 16, see Figs. 2, 3 and 16. I mount on the side of the casing a spring impressed bolt 17 the spring 18 tending to impel the bolt inward. This bolt is mounted in the path of the holes 16 and is of a size to enter any of said holes. The operator or user seizes this pin or bolt 17 with his left hand, which frees the upper roller and permits it to turn readily. He then grasps the windlass 9 and turns the lower roll until he has unrolled a surface of clean toweling, using 12 to 18 inches, or less. He then lets go the bolt or pin and it enters one of the holes 16 and locks the upper roll from further turning. If it does not happen to strike one of the holes, it slides over the surface of the disk for a few inches till a hole is reached. This also provides for some slack of the towel. He then uses the towel and, since there is access to the towel on both sides, he can use both sides of the towel, wiping one hand on one side and one on'the other. This is v'easily done by reason of the loose slack of the towel. The towel can be turned part way round and he can use all portions of it. He

then, if he is a thoughtful man, winds it up for the exposure of a fresh surface for the next user. Usually, however, he will leave the soiled surface exposed for the next man to wind up.

The mountings for the rollers consist of the brackets 19, (see Figs. 7 to 9), which are bolted at 20 to the walls of the cabinet, and said brackets have suitable bearings for the axles of the'rollers. I provide the slot 21, see Fig. 6, leading to said bearings. The disk 15 is mounted by means of a bolt 22 directly in one of said brackets, and the inner side of said bolt, that is the side next to the roller, has a squared or other suitable engaging seat 23. The upper roller has a squared or other suitable engaging end 24 which engages this seat. Of course the squaredV socket and squared end may be of any suitable equivalent non-rotatable shape, and I wish the word squared here and elsewhere used, to have this meaning. ing means.

When the device is to be loaded, the roller with the towellng upon it, simply has its squared end thrust into said seat and the pin at the other end of the roller dropped through the slot 21 to the roller seat. The

- slot is directed upward'and, since the pull on the roller is always downward, the roller is secured and thus is in readily removable relation to the disk and bearing. The roller must always turn with the disk, and when the disk is not permitted to turn the roller cannot turn. At the same time the disk cannot be moved from its location or separated from the wall of the cabinet. The lower roll, or soiled towel roll, must be secure against the eect of gravity and against. the upward pull on the towel. These are opposed to each other, not in the same direction, as in the upper roll.

The lclean towels are thus entirely separated from the soiled ones. I do not know that this is found in any other cabinet, and I regard it as an important feature of my construction because all possibility of contamination is thus avoided. The partition which closes olf entirely the clean from the soiled towels also serves to strengthen the structure and prevent the sides from being pushed out of alinement, which is important to keep the rolls in their proper parallel operative position.

I provide in the bracket for the lower roll, to the left, a slot and seat for the roller pin, and on the right mount the windlass between the bracket and the wall; that is, on the inside of the bracket, I provide a squared or other suitable engaging socket 23, and on the right end of the lower roller I provide a squared or other'y suitable engaging head 24 similar to the squared head to the left of the upper roller. I also provide on the left side of the lower roller a latch 25, see Fig. 11, shutting down over the y pin in the end of the roller, thus holding the end of the roller ina closed socket and secure from movement in either up or down direction.

I provide for the windlass a pawl and a pin ratchet 26, see Fig. 10,A on the inside of the casing so as to prevent turning of the windlass or crank in the wrong direction.

The two rollers are preferably the same and interchangeable. In loading the device the roller supplied withthe clean toweling must have the squaredend at the leftso as to engage the disk. The unrolling roller, that is the lower roller, must have the squared end at the right so as to engage the-crank or windlass seat. These rollers are provided by the towel supply company usually, with the length of toweling demanded by the service, and the attendant can, by the use of one hand, remove the upper roller, place the clean towel roller within the seat, remove the lower roller, replace it by an empty roller, either the one from the upper casing or cabinet, or some other, thread' the towel through and put it in position in a fraction of a minute.

I may have various ways of fastening the covers down. These I show in Figs. 12, 13, 14, etc. In Fig. 12 I show spring clips 27l passing through holes 28 in a flange 29 made fast to and a part of the side walls. These flanges` add a. great deal tothe stiffness of the device.

I show in Fig. 13 a securing button 30, much like the button on the curtain of an automobile. In Fig. 14 I show va button 31 to be turned' by the thumb and 'finger like a clamp or latch. vIn Fig. 15 I show the upper lid held down partly by its own weight and the weight of the coiled part 11, and I show also a wire bolt 37 adapted to be slipped into the curved lips of the lid and compartment edge so as'to lock them together. This bolt has the shape as shown at the left, of a U Awith unequal legs. One leg passes into one hollow space and the other into the other. It is thus necessary to draw it out far enough only to clear the y In Fig. 16 I show hasps, a bar 33 and a lock 34.

In Fig. 1.7 I show both the upper and the lower box or casing having a square outline and the doors hinged at 3'5 and 36. This is a construction favorable to the use of wood. In Figure 18 I show the recess carried clear to the back, thus insuring the separation of the two compartments and also affording a deeper recess, whereby greater convenience is afforded to the user of the toweling and he is enabled by push ing on the toweling from the front to secure a greater length of free toweling. When this is not done, as in Fig. 6, I may provide in the Vhollow space back of the crescent or curved portion a drawer 38,A or a recess, as is shown in Fig. 6.

My device is adapted for use in hotels, Pullman wash rooms, factories, school rooms, offices, private kitchens, private bath rooms, and in fact wherever places for washing hands or face may be. p

It will be seen that I have thus provided a very simple device, one requiring a minimum of attention, one which cannot get out of order, which does not adapt itself to abuse or to the use of the towels for improper purposes, or wear on the towel surface, and one which is economical and sanitary in that it keeps the soiled towels hidden away where they cannot be got at, and separated and closed olf entirely from the clean towel case.

It will be noted that the pin or bolt 17 in no sense-limits the length of toweling to be used. There isno temptation, however, for a user to wind off an undue length because the towel thus wound olf passes into the soiled towel compartment. The impulse to the user is to let go the said bolt and stop the unwinding of the towel as soon as he has enough towel unwound. To discourage, moreover, the possibility of a user pulling the pin 17 out with his left hand andyanking down great lengths of the towel/ing with his right hand, disregarding the windlass or crank, I may provide friction devices against the disk 15. If more towel is needed, however, it may be obtained without using the windlass or crank by pulling on the slack towel while retaining the spring temporarily withdrawn.

I wish to dwell particularly and emphatically upon the soiled or used towel surface being isolated in a separate compartment from the clean toweling. This, as pointed out previously, is very important in preventing the spread of disease, and not only is it separated but it maybe subject to disinfectants with very great advantage.

Some of the-advantages of my device arethe readiness with which the device may be loaded, the fact that the toweling is not wasted in loading, the fact that only two rolls are used and these are interchangeable, the fact that there is no rictional contact of the towel with rollers and no consequent abrasion, the fact that one man can get as little towel surface as he desires. Other considerations are the ease with which the device may be loaded, the catches, the locks .all operable by one hand so that the attendant can uncover the case, take out the old rolls and load it with the towels he holds in his other hand or arms, and do all this expeditiously and easily. Other advantages are the simplicity of parts, the smallness of wall space used, the ease with which the desired slack can ber obtained, and other advantages which have been pointed out before.

In devices of this kind the ease with which the catches can be operated is a great advantage, at the same time due consideration must be paid to the situation where the toweling is to be used, for instance the securing means in a device to be used for mischievous school boys should be much more complete than those used, say, in a private lavatory, as is obvious. Y p

I reserve the right to all equivalents to the parts herein shown, and what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, 1s:

l. A roller towel cabinet comprising a casing containing two substantially closed chambers separated from each other, each of said chambers being provided with a slotlike opening to permit the passage therethrough of the strip of toweling, said openings being in substantially parallel relation, towel rollers, adapted to have a strip of towcling wound thereon, detachably mounted in each of said chambers, the one for the clean and the other for the soiled toweling, a perforated disk mounted to rotate with the first mentioned roller, a spring-impressed pin normally bearing against said perforated disk and adapted to engage said perforations, the said pin being provided with a suitable head adapted to be grasped by the operator, and means exterior to the second chamber'and connected to said second roller for turning same when desired, substantially as described.

2. A roller towel cabinet comprising a casing containing two substantially closed chambers separated from each other, each of said chambers being provided with a slotlike opening to permit the passage therethrough of the strip of toweling, said openings being in substantially parallel relation, towel rollers, adapted to have a strip of toweling wound thereon, detachably mounted in each of said chambers, the one for the clean and the other for the soiled toweling, a perforated disk mounted to rotate with the first mentioned roller, a spring-impressed pinv normally bearing against said perforated disk and adapted to engage said perforations, the said pin being provided with a suitable head adapted to be grasped by the operator, means exterior to the second. chamber and connected to said second ro-ller for turning same in one direction, when desired, and means for locking said secondl rolle-r against turning in the opposite direction, substantially as described.

3. A roller towel cabinet comprising a casing containing' two substantially closed chambers separated from each other, each of said chambers being provided with a slotlike opening to permit the passage therethrough of the strip of toweling, said openings being in substantially parallel relation, towel rollers, adapted to have a strip of toweling wound thereon, detachably mounted in each of said chambers, the one for the clean and the other for the soiled toweling, a perforated disk mounted to rotate with the first mentioned roller, a spring-impressed pin normally bearing against said perforated disk and adapted to engage said perforations, the said pin being provided with ai suitable head exterior to said chamber and adapted to be grasped by the operator, and means exterior to the second chamber, located on the opposite side of said cabinet from said pin and connected to said second. roller, for turning same when desired, substantially as described.

4. A roller towel cabinet comprising a casing containing two` substantially closed chambers separated from each other, each of said chambers being provided with a slotlike opening to permit the passage therethrough of the strip oftoweling, said openings bein in substantially arallel relation, towel ro 1ers, adapted to have a strip o-f toweling wound thereon, detachably mounted in each of said chambers, the one for the clean and the other for the soiled toweling, a perforated -disk mounted to rotate with the lirst mentioned roller, a spring-impressed pin normally bearingA against said perfo-rated disk and adapted to engage Ysaid perforations, the said pin being provided with a suitable head exterior to said chamber and adapted to be grasped by the operator, means exterior to the second chamber located on the opposite side of said cabinet from said pin, and connected to said second roller, for turning same when desired, and means for locking said second roller against turning in the opposite direction, substantially as described.

5. A roller towel cabinet comprising a casing containing two substantially closed chambers separated from each other, each of said chambers being provided with a slotlike opening to permit the passage therethrough of the strip of toweling, said openings being in substantially parallel relation, towel rollers, adapted to have a strip of toweling wound thereon, detachably mounted in each of said chambers, the one for the clean and the other for the soiled toweling, automatic means for normally locking the first mentioned roller, with hand controlled means operable from one side of the cabinet for releasing said locking means, and means for turning said second roller in one direction only located exterior to the second chamber, and on the opposite side of said cabinet from said releasing means, substantially .as described.

6. A roller towel cabinet comprising a casing containing two substantially closed chambers separated from each other, eachV of said chambers'being provided with a slotlike opening to permit the passage there,- through of the strip of toweling, said openings being in substantially parallel relation towel rollers, adapted to have a strip of toweling wound thereon, detachably mounted in each of said chambers, the one for the clean and the other for the soiled toweling, automatic means for normally locking the irst mentioned roller, with hand controlled means operable from one side of the cabinet for releasing said locking means, means for lturning said second roller in one direction only located exteriorto the second chamber, and on the opposite side of said .cabinet from said releasing means, and means for locking said second roller against turning in the opposite direction, substantially as described.

7. A roller towel cabinet comprising a casing provided with two chambers separated 'from each other, a pair of parallel rollers, for holding clean and soiled toweling, mounted, respectively, in said chambers, one of said rollers having engagement at the one side of the cabinet with a checking device and the other having engagement at the other side of the cabinet with a winding device, means for rendering the checking device temporarily inoperable by the use of one hand whereby the device may be freed with one hand to be wound by the other, so as to secure a length of clean toweling, substantially as described.

8. In a roller towel cabinet, in combination, an upper chamber, a lid therefor open-- ing upward, a lower chamber, a lid therefor opening downward, mountings in said chamber for rollers, said rollers being readily detachable from said. mountings, but

made to turn therewith, and means whereby when the lids are opened a pair of rollers may be inserted in the chambers, one to unwind from the other, the toweling passing at the edges of the respective lids, with means for turning one of said rollers, and thereby drawing the toweling from the other roller, substantially as described.

9. A roller towel cabinet comprising a casing containing two chambers separated from each other, doors hinged to said chambers and normally substantially closing same, but leaving when closed a slot-like .opening to permit the passage therethrough of the strip of toweling, the wall of each 'chamber and the adjacent edge of the door being provided with a hollow tubular bead -to serve as rounded guides for the toweling,

towel rollers, adapted to have a strip of toweling wound thereon, detachably mounted in each of said chambers, the one for the clean and the other for the soiled toweling, the web of the toweling passing through said slots, and fastening means for said doors comprising substantially 'U-shaped hooks having arms of unequal length adapted to engage in and stiffen and space apart said tubular beads, with means for drawing the toweling from one roller to the other through said slots, substantially as described. v

In testimony whereof, I aiiix my signature.

GUY w. rERDoN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2458868 *Dec 9, 1944Jan 11, 1949Time Oil CoDisposal receptacle
US3245739 *Jun 15, 1964Apr 12, 1966Clausen Shelby MDispenser
US4222621 *Jul 11, 1979Sep 16, 1980Greenlee Lois JDevice for storing and dispensing tissues, towels, and the like that are provided in the form of rolls
US20100274384 *Dec 21, 2007Oct 28, 2010Sca Hygiene Products AbContinuous roll wipe material dispenser
DE20309309U1 *Jun 13, 2003Jul 22, 2004Ophardt Hygiene-Technik Gmbh + Co. KgRoller towel dispenser has upper feed roller and lower take-up roller mounted with their shafts at right angles to backing plate, section of towel for use passing between these with its edge towards user
Classifications
U.S. Classification312/34.16, 211/16, 55/354
International ClassificationA47K10/28, A47K10/24
Cooperative ClassificationA47K10/28
European ClassificationA47K10/28