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Publication numberUS1410913 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 28, 1922
Filing dateJun 9, 1919
Publication numberUS 1410913 A, US 1410913A, US-A-1410913, US1410913 A, US1410913A
InventorsCarpet Cleaning Process
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carpet cleaning process and apparatus
US 1410913 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Mar. 28, 1922.

2 SHEETS-SHEET I.

www 4 H. F. GRAY. CARPET CLEANING PROCESS AND APPARATUS.

APPLICATION FILED JUNE9, 1919.

1,410,913. Patented MM. 2s, 1922.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

illNlTED S'l'ATrlS BALLA F. GRAY, OF DENVER, COLORADO.

CARIEET CLEANING PROCESS AND APPARATUS.

Letonia.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Mar. 28, 1922.

Application filed June 9, 1919. Serial No. 302,690.

To all whom t may conce/m.'

.Be it known that l, llALLA l?. GRAY, a citizen o t the United States, residing at the city and county of Denver, and State of Colorado, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in `Carpet-Cleaning Processes and Apparatus; and l do declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention,` such as will enable others skilled in the art towhich it appertuinsk. to make and use the same, reterence being had to the accompanying drawings, and to the characters of reference marked thereon, which form a part of this specification. f

My invention relates to a process and apparatus for cleaning carpets, rugs and like or similar articles. The invention may be termed a semi-dry process, as distinguished from wet washing on the one hand. and the ordinary pneumatic cleaning process on the other hand.

l have found that by applying to the carpet or rug to be cleaned, a dirt or refuse holding medium, such as vulcanized oil` either alone or mixed with powdered cork, sawdust or other similar material,` and employing in connection therewith a small amount of liquid, as water or any of the so-called dry cleaning' liquids, as benzine, gasolcne, etc., l am able thoroughly clean, the carpet, the principle 'being' that the soil or refuse holding medium has an affinity for the dirt and as soon as the dirt is loosened by the action of a brush or in any other suitable manner, it will cling' to the holding,r medium and may be removed by suction in a manner similar to removino dust by using a pneumatic cleaner.

As soon as the dirt or soil is loosened from the fibers of the pile or nap of the carpet or other article, it clings to the holding medium. which prevents the dirt from sinking deeper into the pile or nap and makes it practicable. to remove it with the medium bythe action or power of the suction. The liquid and the medium cooperate to pe'- form the dirt-loosening function under tl V action of the brush or other suitable device. The vulcanized oil is soft and moist in the crushed condition in which itis employed, and will of itself, without the aid of liquid,

produce fairly good results, but better results, and practically perfect results, are obtained by employing the liquid in combination with the holding medium.

This holding'medium may be used over and over again before its dirt-holding' or carrying capacity has been exhausted, and I propose to employ a machine which combines the suction and blowing or blast operations whereby the suction acts to remove the dirt-carrying medium from the carpet, draws it into a fan chamber, and then expels it by a blast of air and returns it to the carpet through the medium of a suitable nozzle. When, however, the medium is sufliciently loaded with the refuse material, l discharge it into a refuse-holding receptacle, preferably of the bag form.

This process has advantages over both the wet washing and the strictly dry or pneumatic cleaning process, since it avoids the use of a relatively large quantity of liquid as is required in wet washing, and it produces results greatly superior to the strictly dry cleaning` or pneumatic cleaning process where a carpet is badly soiled or contains dirt which clings to the' pile or nap and therefore can not be removed by the pneumatic process. which only takes up the loose dirt and dust.

ln the drawing l have illustrated a machine suitable for carrying out the process, and this will now be described.

ln this drawing:

Fig. l is a central vertical longitudinal l section of the' machine, the plane of the section beingindicated by the arrow l in Fig. 2.

Fig. 2 is a top plan view, partly in elevation and partly in section, on the line 2 2,

Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a sectional detail, illustrating.

one construction for distributing the refuseholding medium.

Fig. 4 is a side elevation of the machine with the bags removed, or shown in the condition for distributing the refuse-holding medium.

Fin'. 5 is a sectional view of the fan :Member shown on a larger scale.

l'he Vsame reference characters indicate the same parts in all the views.

Let the numeral 5 designate the framework of the structure considered in its entirety and comprising a nozzle, 6, a vacuum chamber 7, a fan chamber 8, a motor housing 9, and a gear case 10. The nozzle 6 is open at the bottom and its lower portion is in communication, as shown at 12, with the vacuum chamber 7, while the latter is in communication with the fan chamber by openings 13 and 14. The fan chamber is provided with openin 15 and 16, which are controlled by a slida le cut-off, 17, providd with: an operating handle 18. The cut-ofi` 17 is curved to conform to the curvature ofthe cylindrical chamber and is of suilicient area to close either of the openings 15" and 16, according as it may be necessary to cause a blast of air to pass through the opening 15 and through a conduit 19 to the nozzle, or pass through the oplening 16 into` a refuse receptacle, 20, whic as illustrated in the drawing, is in the form of a mesh bag adapted to retain the refuse material, but

permitting the air to escape. One extremity ofthe receptacle 20 is connected with the handle 21 of the machine when the device is in use. The conduit 19 is flattened at its forward extremity, as shown at 22, and opens into the nozzle 6 and is utilized for the return of the refuse-holding medium when it is used over vand over again, until its soil-holding capacity shall become exhausted, in which event the slidable cut-off, 17, is adjusted to close the passage 1.5 and open the passage 16 to allow the refuse-laden medium to pass into the receptacle 20.

As shown in the drawing, a suitable medium for holding the refuse material may be placed in each of two receptacles, 23, which are arranged above the opposite extremities of the nozzle, the bottom of each receptacle having perforations 24 which are controlled by a horizontally disposed slide 25. which is also provided with perforations 26. When the perforations 26 are brought into register with the perforations 24, the said medium passes from the receptacle to the carpet, and is distributed by the blast of air, andfur ther, by rotary brushes 27 and 28` which are horizontally disposed and jo'urnalled in thc opposite sides of a casing adjacent the vacuum chamber, as shown at 29. These brushes are preferably rotated in opposite directions, or in the directions indicated by the arrows in Fig. 1, through the medium of two belts 30 and 31, which connect pulleys mounted on a shaft 32, and other similar pulleys, 33 and 34, fast on the shafts of the brushes 27 and 28, respectively.l Assuming that the pulleys on the shaft 32 are rotated in the direction indicated by the arrow in F ig. 4, the belt 31 should be crossed in order to cause the brush 28 to rotate in the proper direction or in the preferred direction.

The fan Within the fan chamber 8 is mounted on the shaftv36 of a motor 37. The motor shaft is also extended beyond the fan chamber, where it is provided with a worm,

`67, which operates a worm wheel, 38, fast on the shaft 32. This worm gearing is enclosed within a housing or gear case, 39.

Mounted upon the framework of the structure, and as indicated in the drawing on top of the motor housing 9, is a receptacle, 40, containing some suitable liquid, as water, benzine, gasoline, or, if desired, a soapy liquid. This liquid is delivered in suitable quantities to the forward extremity of the conduitl 19, and to the opposite ends thereof, through the medium of suitable conduits, 41 and 42, which are in communication with the tank 40 at their rear extremities, and with the said conduit at their forward eX- tremities, the forward end connections be ing designatedfby the numerals 43 and 44.

The receptacle 40 is provided with a valve, 45, for controlling the supply of liquid to the conduits 41 and 42. The stem of this valve extends upwardl through the top of the receptacle 40 an its outer extremity 46 is exposed to enable the operator to manipulate the valve at will. Y

The machine is supported as it travels over the article to be cleaned, by wheels, 4T. mounted on a shaft 48, which,as shown in the drawing, extends through the vacuum chamber in the rear of the brush 28. The machine is further supported by a rear wheel, 49, which is journalled in an arm 50, secured to the motor casing, as shown at 51.

In operating the machine, the latter is pushed. over the carpet or rug 52 to be cleaned, the handle 21 being utilized for the purpose, this handle being forkedvas shown at 53, and its arms 54 being trunnioned at their forward. extremities on the opposite sides of the motor casing. The current for operating the motor may be taken from an ordinary electric light circuit, by inserting a plug 55 in a suitable socket, the conductors 56 which are connected at one extremity with the plug being connected at their opposite extremities with the motor, as shown at 51a. This is an ordinary electric connection` as will be readily understood.

Assuming that the construction of the machine illustrated in Figs. l and 2 is emloyed, and that the refuse-holding or carrying medium is distributed simultaneously with the performance 4of the cleaning function, as the machine is moved over the carpet, the refuse-holding medium is sifted to the surface of the carpet and acted on by the brushes to thoroughly distribute it through the pile oi' nap of the carpet, thus bringing this medium in combination with a suitable amount of liquid taken from the tank 40,

into intimate contact with the pile of the carpet, whereby the dirt is separated from the pile or nap. As this dirt has an afiinity for the said medium, there is a union between them and the suction picks up the dirt-laden medium and carries it into the fan chamber,l after which the air blast drives the medium through the passage 15 of the fan chamber and thence through the conduit 19 to the nozzle, whereby this medium is used over and over until its capacity for holding or carrying more dirt or refuse is exhausted. It will be understood that during such operation thev passage 15 is opened to form free communication between the ian chamber and the conduit 19, while the opposite passage 16 is closed. This is accomplished by the proper adjustmentfoi2 the slidable cut-oil, 17, as heretofore explained.

After the medium has been employed a sulicient. length of time, the cut-ofi' is again adjusted to close the passage 15 and to open the passage 16, Vin which event the air blast drives the refuse-carrying medium into the refuse receptacle-20, where it remains until removed.

If it should be preferred, the medium i'or catching and holding the dirt or refuse material to betaken from the carpet may be distributed over thel surface of the carpet before the carpet-cleaningV operation commences, in which event .the .operation of the machine may be absolutely the same since the medium would bel taken up continuously from the carpet during the `movement of the machine thereover, and by the proper adjustment of the cutoff 17, the medium can be used until it has become completely saturated with they dirt. The distribution of the medium over the carpet, assuming that it is done in advance of the performance ol the cleaning operation, may be done either by hand or by the machine itself. lf by the machine, the construction` illustrated in Fig. f1 would be employed, them-achine being stripped of the conduit 19, thefbagQO andthe liquid tank 4,0. Asshown in the drawing, the tank 4() and the forward extremityv ofy the conduit '19 are connected by .the pipes l11 and 42,th`e forward-extremity of the conduit, as shown in Vthe drawing, consisting' of aumetal member 57, to which the fabric of the conduit, is secured, this metal member having anopening communicating with a nozzle 6 'and being held in place by metal strips or bars 58, having flanges which overlap similar flanges formed on the lower edges o'ithe part, the bars being connected with-the nozzle by bolts 59 to whose upper extremities are applied wing nuts, 60. By` virtue oi this construction, provision is made 'for readily removing the articles from the machine which are not needed during the operation of distributing the refuseholding medium. Hence, the construction shown in FingA 4 is the same ,as that illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 exceptthat certain parts are removed,` making the machine somewhat more easily operable.

It shouldbe explained that as the dirt holding` medium is usedv over and over again, as y heretofore explained, and worked through the pile ot the carpet bythe use of the brush or brushes," fresh surfaces 'of the medium are constantly exposed, to which the dii-l' clings oradlieres; and thisopera tion is continued until the dirt-holding capacity of the medium is exhausted. It should also be explained that the action of the liquid, particularly upon the vulcanized oil, enhances 4the possibilities of the subdivisions of the medium, and therefore increases its dirtand soil-holding capacity.

The refuse-holding medium constitutes a sort of body of material of 10W specific gravity, and therefore readily responds to the action of the suction, which, alone or unaided, willnot remove wet dirt from the pile or nap.

l claim:

1. The herein described process for clean` ing carpets, rugs and the like, comprising continuously applying to the article to be cleaned a solid refuse holding medium to which refuse will adhere, subjecting the latter to such action as will cause the said medium to be worked into and distributed through the fibers ot the nap or pile o'l said articlewhereby the refuse is loosened and taken up by said ,medium, continuously removing and reapplying said medium in cycles, applying moisture to said medium al, one part of the cycle and finally removing the refuse laden medium.

2. A process oi' cleaning carpets, rugs and the like, comprising applying a refuse-holding medium to the article to be cleaned, sub jecting the'latter to such action as will cause the said, medium to be brought into intimate contact with the fibers of the nap or pile ot the said article, whereby the refuse is loosened and taken up by the said medium, removing the medium by suction, returning it by an air blast tothe article, repeating the circulation of the medium by the suction and blast until the mediumis 'suffe f ciently` laden with refuse, and finally discarding the refuse-laden medium.

3. The herein described process ior clean-` ing carpets, rugs' and the like, comprising applying a refuse-holding medium to the article to be cleaned, applying moisture to the article, subjecting thelatter to such action as will cause the medium and moisture vto-be brought into intimate relation with the fibersof the nap orl pile ol the article, whereby the dirtis loosened and clings to the said medium, removing the medium by suction, returning it 'by an air blast to the article and 'continuing the circulation of the medium bythe suction and air blast until the medium hasbecome sulliciently laden with refuse, and finally discarding the refuse-laden medium by an air blast.

et.. Apparatus for cleaning carpets, rugs and the like, comprising a forwardly located nozzle, a vacuum chamber in the rear of the nozzle and ink communication therewith, a suctionandblast-generating means in communication with the vacuum chamber on the suction side and in communication with the nozzle on the blast side,r a refuse-holding neceptacle also in communication with blast-side of the said means, and means for cutting 0H the blast in one direction and causing it to act in the other direction, as may be desired. v

5. Apparatus tm' cleaning carpets, nugs andl the like, comprising a forwardly located nozz-le, a vacuumA chamber` in the near of the nozzle and in communication there,- with, means locatedin they vacuumxchamber and arranged to act on the-carpet. to distribute and apply a solid reflets-holding medium to the article to be cleaned, suctionand blastrgenerating means inv communication with the vacuum (hamer on the suction side and with the. nozzle on the opposite side, the connections being unobstructed se as to permit passage of said solid medium. whereby said solid medium may be returned to the article.

6. Apparatus for cleaning carpets, rugs and the like, comprisi a `forwardly located nozzle, a vacuum Iciamber in the-rear of the nozzle and in communication there-- with, means located in the vacuum chamber and arranged to act on the carpet to distribute and apply a refuse-holding mediium to the article to be cleaned, suctionand blast-generating means in communication with the vacuum chamber on the suction side and with the. nozzle on the opposite side, a refuse-holding receptacle also in. communication with said means on the blast side, and means for cutting oft the blast in either direction and allowing it to act in the other direction. Y

f .7'.,Apparatus for 'cleaning carpets, rugs and. the like having a nap, comprising aforwardly looatednnozzle, a vauumchamber inthe rear of the nozzle anchio communication therewith, a suctionand,l air-blast-generating means incommunication with the vacuumichamber onthe suction side and in communication with` the nozzle on the blast side, said air-blast being adapted to apply through said nozzle a solid refuse-collectingmedium to which refuse` will adhere, and means to distribute and workzsad medium through and between ther fibers ofthe nap, said SuctionY being adapted to remove the refuse-laden medium from thenap.

8. Apparatus. for cleaningcarpets, rugs and the like, having a nap, comprising a forwardly located nozzle, avacuumoha'mber in therearof the nozzle and in communication therewith; a suctionand' air-blast-generating means in communication with the vacuum chamber on the suction side and in communication with the nozzle on the blast side, said air-blastvbeing adapted to apply through Said7 nozzle a refuse-collecting medium to which refuse will adhere, means to distribute and work said medium through es and between the fibers of the nap; said sac- MAJ-0,913

tion bein adapted to remove the mineeluden cevimg meansl having a connection leading to the blast side `of said snctaonand blastgenerating means into which receiving means the blast is adapted to deliver the refuse-laden medium after retrieval from said nap and means. for connecti the suctionand bla-means to and c ng it off from` the nozzle and the receiving means as desined.

9. Apparatus for cleaning carpeta, rugs and the like Xa nap, comprising a forwardly located nozzle, a vacuum chamber in therear of the nozzle and in communication therewith, a suctionand airblast-generating means in communication, with the vacuum chamber on the suction Side and: in communication with .the nozzle on the blast aide, said air-blast being adapted to apply thnaughv said. nozzle a, refuse-colmedium to which refuse will adhere, means to distribute and work said medium through andK between the fibers of the napsaid suction being adapted to remove the reflue-laden medium from the nap, a Yrefuse-receiving` meansA having a connection, leading to the blast side ot said suctionr and blnstfgenerating means into which receiving means the blast is adapted to deliver the refuse-laden medium utter rempval from said nap, said receiving means being .out of communication with the nozzle on `the blast side and means for connecting the suctionandz blast-means to and.

cutting it olf fromy the nozzle and' the receiving means asdsired.

10. Apparatus. `forcleaning v carpets, rugs and tbelike having a nap, comprising a forwardly, .located nozzle, ay vacuumA chamber in the rear of the nozzle and in communication tberewith,a suctionand air-blastgenerating means in. communication with the vacuum chamber on the suotioniside and in communication with the nozale1 on the blast side, said; air-blast being; adapted to apply through said nozzle a refuse-collectfrom the nap, a reuse-reing medium to which` refuse' willv adhere,

meansto distribute and work said medium through and' between the fibers of the nap, said suction being; adapted to remove the refuse-laden medium from the nap, a refuse-receiving means having a connection leading tothe blastside of said suctionand blast-generatingfmeans into which receiving means the blast is adapted to deliver the refuse-laden mediumater removal from said nap, and a receptacle connected with the machine from which said medium may be fed-to the nap ofthe article and means for connecting the suctionand blast-means to and cutting it off from the nozzle and the receiving means as desired.

1h AnK apparatus for cleaning carpets, ragsy and the like havlngv a nap, comprising a 'forwardly located nozzle, a vacuum chamber 1n the rear of the nozzle and 1n communloatlon therewlth, Suctlon-producing means in communication with 'the'. vacuum chamber, a receptacle connected tribute and Work said medium into and between the fibers of the nap, said suction-produeng means being adapted to remove the refuse-laden medium from the nap, the oonnecton passages being unobstructed so as to permit the passage of said solid medium.

In testimony whereof I ax my signature. 15

HALLA Fl GRAY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3183120 *Sep 5, 1962May 11, 1965Toscana Ind Cucine ElectrodomeMethod of washing dishes and the like
US3258810 *Oct 16, 1963Jul 5, 1966Adeszko Henry JDebris collector
US4063961 *Apr 26, 1976Dec 20, 1977Howard Lawrence FMethod for cleaning carpet
US4510643 *May 2, 1983Apr 16, 1985Hisao KitadaVacuum floor polisher
US7208050 *Dec 23, 2002Apr 24, 2007Hydramaster CorporationDirect drive industrial carpet cleaner
US7600289Jun 21, 2004Oct 13, 2009Hydramaster North America, Inc.Three-point mount for an industrial carpet cleaner
US7614112Mar 24, 2008Nov 10, 2009Hydramaster North America, Inc.Three-point mount for an industrial carpet cleaner
US7681280Mar 24, 2008Mar 23, 2010Hydramaster North America, Inc.Three-point mount for an industrial carpet cleaner
US20040117939 *Dec 23, 2002Jun 24, 2004Wayne Eric BooneDirect drive industrial carpet cleaner
US20050278889 *Jun 21, 2004Dec 22, 2005Hayes Charles JThree-point mount for an industrial carpet cleaner
US20080034516 *Aug 8, 2007Feb 14, 2008Andreas Stihl Ag & Co. KgWalk-Behind Sweeper
US20080178414 *Mar 24, 2008Jul 31, 2008Charles James HayesThree-point mount for an industrial carpet cleaner
US20080178417 *Mar 24, 2008Jul 31, 2008Charles James HayesThree-point mount for an industrial carpet cleaner
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/7, 8/142, 8/137, 15/320, 15/347
International ClassificationA47L5/22, A47L5/30
Cooperative ClassificationA47L5/30
European ClassificationA47L5/30