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Publication numberUS1411602 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 4, 1922
Filing dateFeb 10, 1920
Priority dateFeb 10, 1920
Publication numberUS 1411602 A, US 1411602A, US-A-1411602, US1411602 A, US1411602A
InventorsBarnard William G
Original AssigneeBarnard William G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Endless belt
US 1411602 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W.'G. BARN/IRD.

ENDLESS BELT.

APPLICATION FILED FEB. 10.1920.

1,411,602. A PatentedApr.4,1922.

UNITED stares Partnr eprice.

WILLIAM Gr. BARNAR-D, OF SDIVIERVILLE, MASSACHUSETTS.

ENDLESS BELT.

Application iiled February 10, 1920.

T 0 all wiz-0m it may concern Be it known that I, WILLIAM G. Bastiaan, a citizen of the United States, residing at Somerville, in the county of Middlesex and State of Massachusetts, have invented certain new and useful Improvements 'in Endless Belts, of which the following is a speciication, which improvements wereshown, described7 and claimed in an abandoned application filed by me June 4t, 1917, Serial Number 172,615.

My invention relates to endless belts, and' particularly to endless power transmitting belts. Most endless power transmitting belts as heretofore constructed have not been satisfactory for the reason that they would quickly wear out when driven at high speed, and also because after a short period of use they would stretch. Usually, also, the joint connecting the ends of the strap from which the belt was constructed made the belt thicker at the joint than at other points with the result that the belt would pound on the pulleys 'resulting in stretching and quick wear.

My invention has for its object to provlde a flexible endless belt of improved construction and articularl'y to obviate the objections noted above.

The invention consists of an endless belt embodying the peculiar features of construction set forth in the following description and particularly pointed out and defined in the claims at the close thereof.

In the accompanying drawings:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a belt constructed in accordance with my invention.

Figure 2 is a longitudinal sectional view of the belt shown in Fig. 1.

Figure 3 is a section on line 3-3 of Fig. 1..

Figure 4 is a fragmentary sectional detail drawn upon a very much enlarged scale.

That form of'my invention herein shown includes two bands of textile woven fabric 1 and 2 arranged one within the other and fastened together by cement 3 which is forced more or less into the interstices of the two fabrics by pressure. In practice I prefer to employ a cement which will remain flexible after drying, a special cement of this kind having been produced by me for this purpose the making of which it is unnecessary for me to describe here. This use of a dry flexible cement between and uniting the Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Apr. 4, 1922.i

serial No. 357,764.

two bands is, however, a feature of my vpresent invention.

In the preferred form of gmy invention each band 1 and 2 is made from a length of woven tape having a selvage at each edge, said tape being produced by the well known herring bone weave which gives the belt a surface which grips the pulleys better than a plain weave.

The ends of each band 1 and 2 are formed with oppositely oblique edges and after being brought together edge to edge as indicated at t they are cemented to a relatively thin and narrow textile tape 5 laid obliquely in position on the band so as to cover the joint d and overlie both ends of the band, the ends of said tape being wrapped around the side edges of the band and cemented to the opposite side of the latter. After applying the tapes 5 to the bands 1 and 2 cement is applied to the exterior of the band 2 and to the interior of the band 1 after which the band 2 is placed within the band 1 and the two are pressed together. As will be clear from Figs. 1 and 2 the two bands are assembled with the two joints l separated, or staggered relatively, so that each is opposite the body portion of the other band, the ends of each band, the ends of itstape 5, and the body portion cf the latter, beingthen sewed together and to the other band by two short longitudinal lines of through-and-through stitches 7 and 8.

My improved belt is of simple and inexpensive construction and requires no metal parts. It is uniformly flexible and strong, durable, and particularly adapted for high speed work, and in situations where it is necessary that the belt withstand hard and continuous usage.

By using bands 1 and 2 woven with selvages at both sides I avoid the objectionable folding and longitudinal stitching necessary with textile belts as heretofore constructed in order to prevent the side edges from fraying. For the purposes of illustration Fig. 2 indicates a thickening of the belt at the 'joints d but as a matter of fact the tapes 5 are, in practice, so thin that they do not visibly increase the thickness of the belt at these points. Therefore, the joints of my improved belt do not pound or cause increased tension in passing over the pulleys so that said belt runs smoothly and under uniform tension. Moreover, the particular method described above of connecting the ends of each band together by sewing and cernenting them to the adjacent body or intermediate portion of the other band, lnot only provides a very strong and serviceable joint which is as flexible as any other ortion of the belt, but also encloses the en s of the threads at the ends of each band so that they cannot fray or ravel.

What I claim is:

l. An endless belt of the character described comprising two bands each of which is a strip of textile materialhaving parallel oblique end edges abutted one against the other; means fastening said bands together, one inside of the other to form` a unitary flexible belt structure having the joint of one band sta 'gered relatively' to the joint of the other and; and an obliquely transverse strip of textile material upon the exterior side of each band overlying the joint at said abutting ends; said strip having itsends folded around the sides of its band and extending in between the two bands, and means fastening said stri i to its band.

2. An endless belt of t e character described` comprising two bands arranged one within the other, each of said bands being a stri) of textile material having parallel Vo lique end edges abutted one against the other; means fastening said bands together to form a unitary and flexible belt structure having the joint of one band staggered relatively to thejoint of the other band; a )ieee of textile material upon the exterior side of each band overlying the joint at said abuttinfr ends, said piece having portions thereof` folded around the sides of its band and extending in between the two bands, and means fastening said piece to its band.

3. An endless belt of the character described comprising two bands arranged one within the other, each of said bands being made up of a strip of textile material having its ends brought together opposite each other; means fastening said bands together with the joints between their ends sta gered relatively to form a unitary flexible elt structure; a transverse piece of textile material for each band overl ing the joint between the ends thereof, an means yfastening said piece to both ends of its band. i 4 j 4:. An endless belt of the character de scribed comprising two bands arranged :one within the other, each of said bands 'being made up of a strip of textile material having its ends abttin one against the other;

Hmeans fastening sai bands together to form a unitary flexible belt structure; a transverse piece of textile material upon the exterior side of each band overlying the joint at said abutting ends, and means fastening said piece to both ends of its band.

In testimony whereof I have ailixed my signature.

WILLIAM o. lBalestrino, f

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2566262 *Dec 18, 1947Aug 28, 1951Goodrich Co B FBelt and method of splicing the same
US5360379 *Oct 25, 1993Nov 1, 1994Alliedsignal Inc.Packaging machinery belt with non-directional splice
US5385765 *Oct 26, 1992Jan 31, 1995Alliedsignal Inc.Splicing for fluoropolymer coated belts
US5451189 *Aug 9, 1994Sep 19, 1995Alliedsignal Inc.Packaging machinery belt with non-directional splice
Classifications
U.S. Classification474/254, 24/38, 474/258
International ClassificationF16G3/00, F16G3/10
Cooperative ClassificationF16G3/10
European ClassificationF16G3/10