Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1412603 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 11, 1922
Filing dateApr 23, 1921
Priority dateApr 23, 1921
Publication numberUS 1412603 A, US 1412603A, US-A-1412603, US1412603 A, US1412603A
InventorsThompson Berry Althea
Original AssigneeThompson Berry Althea
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Innersole
US 1412603 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. T. BERRY.

INNERsoLl-i.

APPLICATION FILED AFR. 23 1921 Patented Apr. 11, 1922.

e s /w/H, o o o o o f O O O O o O o O o O O l 1 h INVENTDH 9 O O O O ATTDHNEYE UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

INNERsoLE Specification of Letters Patent. Patented Apr. 11, 1922.

Application led April 23, 1921. Serial No. 463,798.

To all whom t may concern.'

Be it known that I, ALTHEA T. BERRY, a citizen of the United States, residing at Volfeboro, in the county of Carroll and State of New Hampshire, have invented new and useful Improvements in lnnersoles, of .which the following is a specification.

This invention relates chiefly to an inner sole, adapted to belinserted loosely in a shoe as a slip inner sole.

The invention is embodied in an improved i laminated inner sole structure having the desirable qualities and advantages hereinafter set forth. p

Of the accompanying drawings forming a part of this specification,-

Figure l is a top plan view of my improved inner sole.

Figure 2 isa bottom plan same.

Figure 3 is a section on line 3-3l of F igure 1.

rlhe same reference characters indicate the same parts in all of the gures.

In the drawings, 12 represents a soleshaped top layer, having a smooth non-irritant foot-bearing surface, and preferably composed of leather, a thin split leather being preferred, because this variety of leather is somewhat porous and permits the seepage through it of perspiration from the foot. 13 represents a sole-shaped bottom layer of soft, resilient7 vulcanized rubber, and provided with a multiplicity of orifices, 14, formed by cutting outportions of the layer. Theseorifices, by interrupting the continuity of the layer, increase its resilience, so that the layer expands more freely edgewise when its thickness is. decreased by compression, than would be the case if the layer were imperforate.

15 represents a sole-sliaped intermediate layer composed of absorbent and resiliently compressible fibrous material, such as wool, the layer 15 being preferably cut from a View of the sheet of knitted woolen fabric.

The intermediate layer is adapted to absorb perspiration seeping through the top layer, without being matted, or permanently compressed or condensed, the nature 0f the fibers of which it is composed being such that they will not pack solidlytogether when wet. The intermediate layer, therefore, yields to compressive pressure tending to reduce its thickness, and is adapted to return to' its normal thickness on the removal of such pressure.

The orifices in the rubber layer 13 allow some of the moisture absorbed by the intermediate layer to pass through the rubber layer and be absorbed by the outer sole, or by the permanent inner sole of the shoe, so that the bottom of the foot is kept relatively lloisture seeping from below through the shoe bottom will not seep through the imperforate portions of the rubber layer. Such limited quantities of this moisture as may pass through the orifices 14, will be entirely absorbed and retained by .the intermediate layer 15,' without seeping upward through the top layer, so that the foot-bearing surface is protected against moisture from the outside.

The porous and springy intermediate layer cooperates with the apertured rubber layer in providing a desirable cushion, the effectiveness, life and durability of each layer being increased by its association with the other. The improved insole has a flexibility and a resilient compressibility not possible in a sole of equal thickness made in a single layer, or one which includes air cells adapted to stand up under pressure, the sole being adapted to conform to movements of the foot in any direction, and to locally assume its normal form when pressure is released at vone portion and applied at another portion of the foot-bearing surface.

Tool and rubber are poor conductors of heat and cold, so that my improved insole 'tends to preserve the normal temperature of the foot by protecting it from either warm or cold surfaces i The layers may be united by any suitable means, to permit the handling of the sole as a single part. As here shown, the marginal portions of the layers are united by a fastening thread 20, passed through some of the orifices 14 in the bottom layer, through the intermediate and top layers, and across the margins of the assembled layers. Said thread may be of any suitable fibrous material, or of wire.

The described laminated flexible insole may be permanently incorporated in a shoe, and attached to other component parts thereof, in any suitable way. For example, an inner sole of the laminated construction described, may be secured to the upper and outer sole of a McKay-sewed shoe, or to the upper and welt of a welt shoe, the top layer l2 being sufficiently substantial, or if de-V sired, suitably reinforced to support McKay stitches, or inseam stitches.

I claim:

1. A laminated flexible insole, comprising a top layer of porous material, having a smooth, non-irritant foot-bearing surface, and a plurality of supporting layers, each resiliently compressible between the top layer and a supporting sole, and each adapted to assume its normal thickness on removal of compressing pressure, said supporting layers including a bottom layer of soft resilient rubber, having a multiplicity of perforations whereby its resilience is increased, and an intermediate layer of absorbent material, interposed between the -top and bottom layers, the porosity of the top layer and the perforations of the bottom layer permitting the absrption, by the intermediate layer, of moisture from above and below the latter.

2. A laminated flexible insole, comprising a top layer of porous material, having a smooth non-irritant foot-bearing surface, a resiliently compressible bottom layer adapted to bear on a supportin sole, and composed of soft resilient vu canized rubber, having a multiplicity of orices whereby its resilience is increased, and an intermediate layer interposed between the bottom and'top layers, 'and composed of absorbent knitted woolen fabric, adapted to yield to compressive pressure, and to return to its normal thickness after the removal of such pressure, said bottom and intermediate layers being simultaneously compressible between the top layer and a supporting sole, the porosity fof the top layer, and the perforations of the bottom layer permitting the absorption, by the intermediate layer, of moisture from above and below the latter. j

3. A laminated flexible insole, comprising a top layer of porous imp'erforate leather, presenting an uninterruptedV foot-bearing surface, and a plurality of supporting layers, each resiliently compressible between the top layer and a supporting sole, and each adapted to assume its normal thickness on removal of compressing pressure, said supporting layers including a bottom layer of soft resilient rubber, having a multiplicity of perforations whereby its resilience is increased, and an intermediate layer of absorbent material, in-

terposed between the top and bottom layers, y

the porosity of the top layer and the perforations of the'bottom layer permitting the absorption, by the intermediate layer, of.-

moisture from above and below the latter.

In testimony whereof I have affixed my signature.

ALTHEA THOMPSON BERRY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2622348 *Jul 11, 1951Dec 23, 1952Marcellite M SellingerRemovable insole assembly for footwear
US2635363 *Jun 9, 1950Apr 21, 1953Abraham L DorginWater resistant inner sole
US5465508 *Jun 3, 1994Nov 14, 1995Salomon S.A.Insole for sport shoe
EP0075499A1 *Aug 27, 1982Mar 30, 1983SOCIETE INDUSTRIELLE DE MATHA Société à Responsabilité LimitéeAbsorbent composite, especially for the manufacture of socks for footwear
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/44, D02/961
International ClassificationA43B17/00, A43B17/08
Cooperative ClassificationA43B17/08
European ClassificationA43B17/08