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Publication numberUS1417170 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 23, 1922
Filing dateNov 11, 1920
Priority dateNov 11, 1920
Publication numberUS 1417170 A, US 1417170A, US-A-1417170, US1417170 A, US1417170A
InventorsHosmer Edward Everett
Original AssigneeHosmer Edward Everett
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe construction
US 1417170 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. E. HOSMER.

SHOE cowsmucnow.

APPLICATION FILED NOV.I|,1Z0v 1,417,170, Patenwd M.-

o" mm m H fr 5 ATTORNEYS WITNESSES STATES EDWARD MEET! HOSMER, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

SHOEI CONSTRUCTION.

amina.

To all whom it may canoe/1m:

Be it lrnown that I, EDWARD E. Hosmn'n, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of the city of New York, borou h of Manhattan, .in the county and Sta of New York, have invented a new and Improved Shoe Construction, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description.

This .iinv'ention relates to foot wear and more particularly to an improvement in the construction of shoes.

In the ordinary construction of shoes now ingeneral use, the point of contact of the heel is above or on a line with the point of contact of the ball of the foot. l Vhere the heel is raised, it eflects a constant strain on the spinal column to obtain the proper balance' of the body, thus forcing every muscle 7 from the heel to the top of the-head into an unnatural posture which gives rise to complications in the nervous system.

The invention seeks therefore for one of its principal objects to provide a shoe which is so constructed as to properly house and support the foot whereby to strengthen the muscles, tendons and bones to eliminate fatigue in standing and walking and to more efiiclently support the arch of the foot and obtain 'a natural posture of they body.

Another object of the invention is to pro vide a shoe, the construction of which will promote the proper growth of a childs foot and correct malformations in an adults foot.

A further object of the invention is to provide a shoe construction of the character described which is comparatively simple and inexpensive in construction and manufacture and which does not detract from the appearance or general type of shoes now in use.

A still further object ofthe invention is to provide in the construction of a shoe an improved means for securing the upper to the sole portion thereof to ehmlnate the uncomfortable ridge which obtains at the point of securement where the upper is lasted to the sole under the foot. y 7

With the above recited and other objects in view, some of which will appear hereafter, the invention resides in the novel construction, combination and arrangement of parts set forth in the following specification, the appended claims and the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure l is a side elevation of a shoe con structed in accordance with the invention,

Specification of Letters Patent. Patgntqgdl lway 23, 1922-,

Application filed November 11, 1920. Serial No. 423,427.-

ridge as is the case in the ordinary construction of shoes. The heel 14 is provided with a spherical depression 15 and the inner lining 16 of the bottom of the shoe extends throughout the length of the same. The lowest point of the depression or concavity 15 indicated by the numeral 17 is disposed in a horizontal line below the lowest point of the inner surface of the ball 18 whereby the bearing of the heel of the foot will be below the bearing of the ball of the foot to more efliciently support the foot structure. By such an arrangement the appearance of the shoe from the exterior is not varied from the general appearance or style of shoes now in use. In order to support and embrace the arch of the foot more eiiiciently, an insert 19 of relatively stiff material is arranged between the lining 20 and the upper 10 of the shank. of the shoe and said insert is turned outwardly as'at 21 and secured by the stitching which holds the upper and bottom of the shoe together. By the construction heretofore described, the ball of the foot contacts with the shoe at a point, above the point of bearing of the heel and the arch is properly embraced and housed by the inserts I 19 arranged at the opposite sides of the shank. The lowering of the heel together with the shank braces prevent lateral moving of the foot at the arch, enables the wearer-to walk and stand longer without fatigue, promotes elasticity of carriage, increases the vitality of the wearer by eliminatingconstant jars and shocks imparted to the spinal column where the heel is level with the ball or supported above the same, f

It is to be understood that the right is reserved to embodiments other than those actually illustrated herein, to the full extent indicated by'the general meaning of the terms in which the claims are expressed and by variations in the phraseology of the same.

I claim:

1. In a shoe construction, a shoe having the interior surface of the bottom thereof formed in such a manner that the bearing surface for the heel is disposed substantially below the bearing surface for the ball of the foot whereby the heel shall sustain the entire weight of the body of the wearer.

2. In a shoe construction, a shoe including an upper and a sole havin the upper interior surface of said sole formed in such a manner that the point of bearing of the ball of the foot is disposed substantially above the point of bearing of the heel whereby the heel shall sustain the entire Weight of the body of the wearer.

3. In a shoe construction, a shoe including a sole provided with a substantial depression extending into the heel portion thereof to dispose the point of bearing for the heel of the foot substantially below the bearing surface for the ball in order that the heel will sustain the entire weight of the body of the wearer.

4., In a shoe construction, a shoe having a heel provided with a substantial depression therein in the upper interior surface thereof, and a thick inner sole in the ball portion of the shoe constituting means for supporting the heel substantially below the ball of the foot whereby the heel of the wearer will sustain the entire weight of the body.

5. In a shoe construction, a shoe having a heel provided with a substantial depression in the upper interior surface thereof and a thick outer sole constituting means for supporting the heel substantially belowthe ball of the foot whereby the heel of the wearer will sustain the entire weight of the body.

6. In a shoe construction, a shoe having a heel provided with a substantial depression in the upper interior surface thereof and thick outer and inner soles in the ball portion of the shoe constituting means for supporting the heel substantially below the ball of the foot whereby the heel of the wearer will sustain the entire weight of the bodv EDWARD EVERETT HOSMER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2758397 *Jun 7, 1954Aug 14, 1956Riggs Florida LShoe construction
US2767490 *Apr 16, 1953Oct 23, 1956Marbill CompanySlip soles for converting over-the-shoe boots to over-the-foot boots
US2992496 *Nov 12, 1958Jul 18, 1961Charlotte HessShoe having an elongated shank portion
US3134381 *Aug 15, 1960May 26, 1964William M SchollShank and heel assembly
US3244176 *Jun 6, 1963Apr 5, 1966Scholl Mfg Co IncCushion for spur heel
US3421517 *Jan 26, 1966Jan 14, 1969Sabel & Co Eugene JTherapeutic shoe
US5012596 *Jul 10, 1989May 7, 1991Schiller Joan EShoe
US5373650 *Dec 8, 1993Dec 20, 1994Langer Biomechanics Group, Inc.High-heeled shoe orthotic device
US6101655 *Jan 7, 1999Aug 15, 2000Heart & Sole Software, Inc.Device for preventing slippage of heel of woman's shoe, molded heel cup and method of forming device and molded heel cup
US6283932 *May 7, 1999Sep 4, 2001Thomas MünchOrthopedic device
DE945901C *Sep 13, 1950Jul 19, 1956Carl BirkenstockAbsatzloser Schuh
WO1993019632A1 *Apr 1, 1993Oct 14, 1993Langer Biomechanics Group IncHigh-heeled shoe orthotic device
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/140, 36/80, 36/16
International ClassificationA43B7/14
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/142, A43B7/14
European ClassificationA43B7/14A20A, A43B7/14