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Publication numberUS1422109 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 11, 1922
Filing dateOct 21, 1921
Priority dateOct 21, 1921
Publication numberUS 1422109 A, US 1422109A, US-A-1422109, US1422109 A, US1422109A
InventorsWilson Lambert Frank
Original AssigneeWilson Lambert Frank
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Propeller
US 1422109 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. w. LAMBERT.

PROP ELLER. 7 APPLICATION F!LED 0CT. 21, 1921.

1,422, 1 09, Patented July 11', 1922,

' 2 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

ire-n stares- FFKQQ PEOPELLER.

Specification of Letters Patent.

' Patented July 11, 1%22.

Application filed October 21; 1921.- Serial No. 509,356.,

T aZZ whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, FRANK iLsoN LAM- BERT, a citizen of the United States, residing at Hancock, in the county of Pottawattamie :and State of Iowa, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Propellers, of which the followlng 1s a speci .fication.

ployed with equal advantage for marine propulsion.

The primary object of the present invention is to provide a propeller which will act with greater efficiency against the 'medium in'which it is rotated and will therefore better serve its purpose and enable the craft.

upon which it is installed, to be propelled more readily and forcibly and at a higher rate of speed and with a more economical consumption of fuel.

Briefly described, the present invention comprises a hub, blades which radiate from the hub and which are of the form usually employed for propelling aircraft, and other blades which are supported at the outer ends of the first mentioned blades and are circumferentially disposed, and another important object of the invention is to so form the working surfaces of the last mentioned blades as to adapt these blades to compact the ambient fluid, whether it be air or water, and thus increase the resistance offered and correspondingly increase the propelling force created through rotation of the propeller.

Another object of the invention is to form the outer circumferential blades of the propeller of such contour as to adapt these blades to more readily cleave the ambient fluid and assist in the formation of a compressed bank of the fluid in rear of the propeller to offer the desired resistance.

In the accompanying drawings,

Figure 1 is a rear elevation of a propeller constructed in accordance with the present invention;

Figure 2 is a side elevation of the propeller;

Figure 3 is an end elevation thereof;

Figure 4 is a sectional view taken substantially on the line -i of Figure 1 looking in the direction indicated by the arrows;

Figure 5 is a similar view on the line 5-5 of Figure 1 looking in the direction indicated by the arrows;

Figure 6 is a similar view on the line 6-6 of Figure 1 looking in the direction indicated by the arrows.

The propeller embodying the present invention comprises a hub 1 which is constructed in any suitablemanner adapting it for mounting upon the propeller shaft, and blades 2 radiate from the hub 1 and are provided with working faces 3 and advancing edges 4.- which are given the required contour to adapt these blades to exert a propelling force in the operation of the propeller, the contour of these blades being substantially that of the ordinary propeller blades employed upon aircraft.

The blades 2 support at their outer ends circumferential blades which are indicated in general by the numeral 5. These blades 5 are termed circumferential for the reason that, generally speaking, they extend on arcs which are concentric to the axis of the hub 1. Each of these blades 5 has a working face which is indicated in general by the numeral 6, the opposite face of each blade indicated by the numeral 7, being however inactive. In addition to being disposed circumferentially with relation to the axis of the hub 1, the blades 5 are disposed diagonally with relation to said axis, and as regards this latter disposition, they are noncorrespondingly placed so that one blade will be diagonal in one direction and the other blade diagonal in the opposite direction. Upon the working face 6 of each blade 5 there is formed a fin which is indicated by the numeral 8. The advancing end of each blade 5 is indicated by the numeral 9 and the opposite or following end by the numeral 10, and by reference to the several figures of the drawings it will be observed that the working face 6 is trans versely concave from end to end, the fin 8 being relatively shallow and merging at one end with the body of the blade 5 substantially at the advancing end 9 thereof and being increased gradually in width and thickness from this end to the opposite end 10 of the said blade. Likewise the fin 8 is gradually curved in an increasing degree from its first to its last mentioned end so that the working face 6 is gradually transversely curved at the advancing end 9 of the blade and the degree of curvature is gradually increased towards the opposite or following end of the blade where it becomes very pronounced. Thus a pocket is formed by the working face of the blade increasing in depth from the advancing to the following 'ends of the blade, and as the propeller is rotated, this pocket will collect the ambient fluid and compact the same and deliver the compacted fluid in'a manner to provide a bank thereof immediately in rear of the propeller.

The circumferential outer edge of each blade 5 or in other words that portion of each blade which is located substantially at the line of juncture of the fin 8 with the working face of the blade, is formed with a longitudinally extending channel 11 relatively narrow and shallow at the advancing edge 9 of the blade and increasing in width and depth in the direction of the following end of the blade, principally for the purpose of rendering the propeller lighter in weight. Having thus described the invention what is claimed as new is: g

1. A propeller comprising a hub, a blade radial thereto and having a surface contour adapting it to exert a propelling force in action, and a circumferential fluid compression blade carried at the outer end of the radial blade and disposed diagonally to the axis of the hub, the working surface of the last mentioned blade being relatively gradually transversely curved at the advancing end of the blade and of gradually increasing transverse curvature in the direction of the hub and of the blade.

2. A propeller comprising a hub, a blade radial thereto and having a surface contour adapting it to exert a propelling force in action, a circumferential fluid compression blade carried at the outer end of the radial blade and disposed diagonally to the aXis of the hub, the last mentioned blade being FRANK WILSON LAMBERT. [L. s.]

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4662823 *Oct 28, 1985May 5, 1987Cooke Frank LAir turbulence blades for ceiling fans
US4722608 *Jul 30, 1985Feb 2, 1988General Signal Corp.Mixing apparatus
US5445215 *Mar 28, 1994Aug 29, 1995Herbert; EdwardFan assembly with heat sink
US6206636Feb 16, 1999Mar 27, 2001Charles S. PowersRibbed impeller
US8776427 *Mar 11, 2013Jul 15, 2014George LeningFish attraction device
US9086053 *Mar 30, 2012Jul 21, 2015General Electric CompanyEnhanced wind turbine blade
US9326495 *Jul 10, 2014May 3, 2016George LeningFish attraction device
US20130259697 *Mar 30, 2012Oct 3, 2013General Electric CompanyEnhanced wind turbine blade
US20140317991 *Jul 10, 2014Oct 30, 2014George LeningFish attraction device
Classifications
U.S. Classification416/235, 416/228, 416/236.00A, 416/210.00R, 416/175
International ClassificationB64C11/00, B64C11/16
Cooperative ClassificationB64C11/16
European ClassificationB64C11/16