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Publication numberUS1422658 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 11, 1922
Filing dateAug 21, 1920
Priority dateAug 21, 1920
Publication numberUS 1422658 A, US 1422658A, US-A-1422658, US1422658 A, US1422658A
InventorsBrooks Lloyd B
Original AssigneeGeorge K Thorman, Joseph W Lassen, Leon C Heller, Brooks Lloyd B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Necktie retainer
US 1422658 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

L. B. BROOKS.

NEGKjlE RETMNER. APPLICATION HLED AUG-21, 1920.

m Jy m 1922;-

zwwmg LLOYD B. BROOKS, 0F PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA, ASSIGNOR TO GEORGE K.

THORMAN, JOSEPH W. LASSEN, LEON C. HELLER, AND LLOYD B. BROOKS, COPART- NEH/S, TRADING AS STAY-RITE MFG. 00., OF PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA.

NECKTIE RETAINER.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented July 11, 1922.

Application filed August 21, 1920. Serial No. 404,984.

To all whom it may concern Be it known that I, LLOYD B. BROOKS, a citizen of the United States, residing in Philadelphia, in the county of Philadelphia and State of Pennsylvania, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Necktie Retainers, whereof the following is a specification, reference being had to the accompanying drawings.

My invention relates to necktie retainers especially adapted to secure and maintain the pendant loose ends of four-in-hand or other similar neckties in proper position against the shirt-front. It is my aim to make the retainer simple in construction, convenient and durable in use, of good appearance, and relatively easy and inexpensive to manufacture. Other advantages obtainable in connection with my invention will become ap arent from the description hereinafter of t e best form of embodiment at present known to me, while its scope and essentials will be indicated in my claims.

In the drawings, Fig. I is a perspective view of a necktie retainer conveniently em bodying my invention.

Fig. II shows a longitudinal mid-section through the device of Fig. I.

Fig. III is a fragmentary View, on a smaller scale than Figs. I and II, showing the device as it would appear to the wearer if his necktie were cut away. in section, as shown, just above it.

Fig. IV is a front view illustrating the device as associated with a shirt and necktie,a portion of the front thickness of the tie being removed.

Referring, first, to .Figs. I and II, it will be seen that the retainer comprises a pair of thin, narrow overlapping metal leaves 1 and 2 united by a relatively close, narrow but rounded bend 3, and lying close together so as to form a narrow or attenuated crotch 4 about at their junction. The device should prefeuably be made of such elastically flexible metal and of such thickness as to make the leaves somewhat resilient, at least in the sense of relative movement with reference to one another. In practice, the device may be formed by doubling a resilient metal strip upon itself with a relatively narrow bend. As shown, the leaves 1 and 2 diverge slightly. 4

Attached or anchored to the leaf 1 near one end thereof in afine, slender tie-piercing and retaining pin 5, here shown as struck up from a narrow slit 6 in said leaf and as merging into the body of the leaf at its own anchored end, where its root 7, so to speak, Widens out with a curved outline intended to give ample strength against breakage at this point of greatest stress. The shank of this pin 5 is substantially uniform or very slightly tapered in cross-section, and is bevelled and rounded off at its corners, and its free end is tapered off to a fine, sharp, well-rounded point 8. The point 8 of the pin 5 extends forward and outward near the corresponding end of the leaf 1, so as to engage and enter the fabric of the tie readily. As shown, the shank of the pin curves forward and outward beyond and away from the leaf surface from the root 7,

,then curves inward toward the leaf surface 'at the middle portion of the pin, and finally curves outward again from a point somewhat in front of the leaf 1 to the point, this last curve dipping into the slit 6 at 9 a little below the front surface of the leaf. Owing to the resiliency of the metal composing the device, the fine, slender pin 5 is decidedly flexible and springy, so that when inserted through the fabric it can yield or spring outward somewhat and yet exert such pressure on the fabric as to tend to force it against the corners of the slit at 9 and thus securely retain it.

T 0 aid the wedging and gripping action at the crotch 4 in securing the device on the edge portion of a shirt-front (whether an open placket, or a coat shirt), one of the leaves may have one or more gripping projections on its inner side adapted to coact with the opposing portion of the other leaf. As shown, the leaf 2 has two such projections on its inner side in line with the slit 6 in the leaf 1, these projections having the form of rounded, knob-like protuberances 10, 11 adapted to force the fabric against the corners of said slit 6. The protuberance 10 is near the junction of the leaves at 3 and the narrowest part of the crotch 4:; the protuberance 11 is near the outer, open ends of the leaves. The inner projection 10 comes into action on shirtedges thin enough to be engaged in the crotch 4:; while both projections come into action on edges too thick for this.

Fig. III shows the device in use as it would appear to the wearer looking down on a section of his shirt and tie just above the same,i. e.,- as if the device of Fig. II had simply been moved to the left and slipped over the front shirt edge 12, the pin 5 being previously or subsequently stuck through the rear thickness 13 of the longer tie-end 14 (see Fig. IV). It will be seen that the device can be applied in this manner with the utmost ease and quickness;

' also that when so applied it is absolutely effective, and of good appearance, besides being, absolutely invisible in use. In practice, it need not be .over 1 or 1% long and *5" wide, and may be made of cold-rolled brass or other springy metal not over thick. The pin 5 may, for a device of this size, be of about the length and diameter of an ordinary household brass pin.

Having thus described .my invention, I claim:

1. A shirt-front necktie retainer comprising a pair of overlapping relatively resilient leaves having means for engaging and gripping a shirt-front edge between them,

and a flexible, springy necktie-piercing and retaining pin havinga subtantially uniform, fine, shank anchored to one of said leaves near one end thereof and a sharp point free and extending forward and outward from near the other end of said leaf, the intermediate portion of said shank being further from said leaf than the portion adjacent the point, so that this latter portion shall act to press the material through which it. is stuck against the leaf and thus retain iton the shank.

2. A shirt-front necktie retainer comprising a pair of overlapping relatively resilient leaves having means for engaging and gripping a shirt-front edge between them, and a fine necktie-piercing and retaining pin anchored to one of said leaves near their junction and thence extending forward toward the other end of said leaf.

3. A shirt-front necktie retainer comprising a pair of slightly divergent overlapping resilient leaves with an attenuated crotch at their junction adapted to wedge upon and grip a shirt-front edge, and a fine, springy, flexible, necktie-piercing and retaining pin with its shank anchored to one-of said leaves near one end thereof and its point free and extending forward and outward from near-the free end of said leaf.

4. A shirt-front necktie retainer comprislng a pair of overlapping resilient leaves with a protuberance upon the inner side of one of them near their junction, and afine, flexible, springy, necktie-piercing and retaining pin'on the outer side of one of said leaves with its shank anchored to said leaf adjacent its junction with the, other leaf and extending first outward from the leaf to which it is so anchored, then inward toward the same, and then outward once more to the pin point, so as to press the ,material through which it'is stuck against the leaf adjacent its own free end.

5. A shirt-front necktie retainer comprising a resilient metal strip doubled upon itself with a relatively narrow bend so as to form a pair of slightly divergent overlapping leaves with an attenuated crotch at their junction adapted to wedge upon and grip a shirt-front edge, and with a knob-like protuberance upon the inner side of one of said leaves adapted to coact with the other in additionally engaging and gripping the shirt-front; and a fine, flexible, springy, necktie-piercing and retaining pin struck up from a narrow slit inthe other of said leaves opposite the aforesaid protuberance with its shank merging with and anchored to the leaf body at the end of said slit adjacent the junction of the leaves and its point free and extending forward and outward from near the other end of said slit.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto signed my name, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, this 18th day of August, 1920. LLOYD B. BROOKS.

Witnesses:

JAMES H. BELL,

A E. L. FULLERTON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2555562 *Oct 22, 1947Jun 5, 1951Lyon Metal Products IncFastening clip
US2573913 *Mar 8, 1949Nov 6, 1951Ki Ku ChainPaper clamp
US2592155 *Mar 15, 1950Apr 8, 1952Johnson Edward ACravat holder
US2655705 *Mar 11, 1950Oct 20, 1953Nash IncBillfold retainer clip
US3026588 *Sep 22, 1958Mar 27, 1962Strong Corrin PHolding pin
US3059298 *Nov 24, 1959Oct 23, 1962Stenby Walter HTie holder and safety pin
US3604072 *Jul 14, 1969Sep 14, 1971Posey William LSafety clip
US3802032 *Oct 4, 1971Apr 9, 1974Weed RInvisible tie clip
US4860402 *Jun 9, 1988Aug 29, 1989Dichtel Ronald JCarpet mat retainer clip
US5966783 *Apr 25, 1994Oct 19, 1999Genereux; Carrol H.Sunglasses and article retainer
WO1989011814A1 *Jun 8, 1989Dec 14, 1989Ronald James DichtelCarpet mat retainer clip
WO2007100242A1 *Jan 29, 2007Sep 7, 2007Den Boogaard Anthoonn Edua VanAn invisible tie clip which also serves as advertising medium
Classifications
U.S. Classification24/66.4, 24/563, 24/354
International ClassificationA44B6/00
Cooperative ClassificationA44B6/00
European ClassificationA44B6/00