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Publication numberUS1428632 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 12, 1922
Filing dateSep 7, 1920
Priority dateSep 7, 1920
Publication numberUS 1428632 A, US 1428632A, US-A-1428632, US1428632 A, US1428632A
InventorsHendrickson David
Original AssigneeHendrickson David
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic coin selector
US 1428632 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

D. HENDRICKSON.

AUTOMATIC COIN SELECTOR.

APPLICATION FILED SEPI. 7. 1920.

' Pandsept. 12,1922.

3 SHEETS-SHEET I.

D. HENDRICKSON. AUTOMATIC COIN SELECTOR.

APPLICATION FILED SEPTJ. 1920.

'Pandsepn I2, 1922.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

. n. m T. T. A

D. HENDRICKSON. AUTOMATIC COIN SELECTOR. APPLICATION FILED sEPTJ, 1920.

Patented Sept. 12, 1922-..

3 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

JNVENTOR. v EE/71102130 A TT ORNE Y.

Patented Sept. i2, E22.

i nare man SON, @F BERKELEY, CALIFORNEA.

AUTMATIC G01N SELECTQR. i

Application met september 7, 1920. Serial No. %,'504.

` Coin Selectors; and ll do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same.

The object of the invention is to provide an automatic mechanism of the electro-mag? netic type for selecting or detecting coins and differentiating between the same and slugs, counterfeits or imitations, suitable for use in connection with coin controlled mechanism such as phonographs, telephones,

, weighing machines and other vending devices, and also adapted for use as a cointester without reference to vending machines or' the like, and With'these objects in view the invention consists in a construction and combination of parts of which a preferred embodiment is shown in the accompanying drawings, wherein: i

' Figure 1 is a side view ofthe same showing the casing in section with the necessary electrical circuits included diagrammatically. I p

Figure 2 is a plan view with the casing y broken away.

Figure 3 is a horizontal section on the plane indicated by the line 3--3 of Figure 1.

Figure 4 is a vertical section on the plane indicated by the line 4-4 of Figure 1. Figure 5 is an enlarged detail view of the time switch mechanism and related parts including the thermostat.

Figure 6 is a detaibsection on the plane of line 6-6 of Figure 1.

Figure 7 is a sectional viewk taken on the plane indicated by tli'e line 7--7 of Figure 2.

The principle of operation of the machine forming the subject of the invention is to set up or induce in the coina difference of potential varying accordin to the material,

from which the coin or imitation thereof is made, by causing the coin or other .object to move by rolling action through a magnetic field created with special reference to the object in View, and in. recognition of the vfact that any element of or at the circumference of such a rolling object will describe "a common cycloidal curve or path while any point or element inside of the circumference will describe a prolate cycloidal curve or path and that by reason of the difference in. the rate of motion in cutting the magnetic flux by such related elements of the rolling ob- ]ect'due to the paths which they describe, there will be currents of electricity induced which will circulate from the points of high potential to those of low potential and will produce magnetic fields opposed to that through which the coin is rolling, so thatthe resultant effect will be to oppose the motlon of the coin to a greater or less extent according to the value or strength of .the current thus set up and that hence there will be a greater or less retarding or crowding effect'upon the coin, tending to repel the same, according to the differences of material, that is to say whether, silver, copper, aluminum, lead, zinc, tin, brass and the like, which differences can be taken advantage ofl in determining the points of deposit of the coins or objects of different material. 'Obviously the retarding or crowding e'ect incident to the opposed currents will be in proportion to the induced current in the coin for a given magnetic flux in the field through which the coin passes, and the current in the coin will vary inversely as the resistance for a given difference in potential. Thus a sil- -ver coin having a resistance greater. thanthat of copper or aluminum and less lresistance than that of lead, zinc, tin, brass and other non-magnetic alloys, can be made.

to follow a path different from such other vmetals while magnetic metals may be caused to stop in the magnetic field so as to permit of separate removal by mechanical means.

Thus in utilizing this rinciple there is employed a chute 10 leadlng to an electro magnet 11 so as to cause a coin to pass l through the field of the magnet as through the gap 12 between the poles thereof,sa1d magnet being arranged in circuit with a battery 13 or other source of electrical energy also including the solenoid 14 of which core 15'is adapted to be raised when the circuit in the conductor 16 is closed. Access to the'chute is controlled by a gate 17 revolubly mounted in a seat 18 and having an operating handle 19, so that when the gate is turned, after the deposit of the coin therein, to permit the coin to enter the chute,

the latter is closed against access from the outside, to prevent the surreptitious introduction of a wire or'other object by which the interior mechanism of the device may be disturbed.

Arranged in the path of a coin traversing the chute, before it reaches the magnetic field represented by the gap of the electro-magnet 11, is a circuit closing element 2O of a dimensionally selective switch having a binding post 22 to which is connected the conductor 16 (as shown in Figure 1) the terminal of said circuit closing element projecting into the chute, When in its normal position, in a position to be struck or engaged by a coin transversing the chute, if the coin is of the diameter for which the coin selecting mechanism is designed. .a smaller coin will pass the projecting terminal of the circuit closing element or will strike the wall of the chute below the terminal of said element and thus will fail to actuate the same. A coin of the proper diameter striking the projecting terminal of the circuit closing element 20 will throw the same to the dotted line position 20 shown in the drawing, said element being pivotally mounted' at 23, and will thus dispose said circuit closing element in engagement with a contact 24 with which isconnected an .element of the conductor 16 extending to the solenoid coil 14. This operation therefore of a coin of the proper dimensions will vclose the circuit through the battery 13, the magnet 11 and the solenoid 14 which as above indicated will raise the solenoid core 15. Connected with the core 15 is a rack bar 25 yieldingly held in its depressed or normal position by a spring 26 and meshing with a pinion 27 which carries an oscillatory wiper arm 28 adapted to terminally traverse or sweep through the magnetic field represented by the gap between the poles of the electro-magnet l1. When the core` 15 therefore is elevated the wiper arm is disposed in the dotted line position indicated at 28a in Figure 1 in position to descend through the magnet field to dislodge any coin which may be retained .in said field by the attractive force of the electro-magnet as hereinafter more particularl explained. The wiper is retained in the elevated or set position aslong as the circuit including the solenoid 14 remains closed, and will descend to dislodge a coin as soon as the said circuit is opened 4through means also hereinafter set forth.

Arranged in operative relation with the circuit closing element or arm 20 of the dimensionally selective switch mechanism, and designed to restore said element .or arm to its normal position indicated in full lines in Figure l with its terminal in the path of al coinA of Vthe'proper dimensions trai versing the chute 10, is a resetting device 29 consisting of a solenoid of which the core 30 is adapted to operate as a plunger to strike said element or arm 20, when 1n the dotted line or circuit closing position and force it to the full line or normal position. Said solenoid core 30 is yieldingly retracted vand held in its normal positon by a spring -create a magnetic field at 12 and energize the solenoid 14, the current passes through the element consisting for example of nichrome wire and after a short period of time the heat affects the switch tongue 34 to close the shunt circuit 16a through contact 35 thereby energizing the solenoid 29 and causing the core thereof to advance in opposi-v tion to theretracting spring 31 to reset or return the circuit closing element 20 to its normal position for engagement by a succeeding coin introduced into the chute. The thermostatic member includes a fiber -base 32 supporting a conducting arm or standard 33, carrying the expansible element 36 which is attached to or bears against the tongue 34 of the circuit closer of the shunt circuit which includes the contact 35. rlhe tongue 34 is included in the main circuit so as to carry the current as soon as the latter is closed by engagement vof'the closer 20 with contact 24.

When the coin which has been introduced, after having actuated the circuit closer 20 reaches the field of the magnet which is now energized by reason of closing the circuit as above explained, it is diverted either one way or the other into one of the receptacles 01,?) and c according to the material of which `it is composed, and as to whether or not it is attracted more or less or is repelled by reason 'of the current set up therein. In

ractice the intermediate receptacle b may be in communication with a passage 37 lead ing .to the vending machine to be operated or designed for the reception of proper coins,'that is to say coins of the proper dimensions (which have successfully stood the test of the dimensional switch mechanism,) and of the 'proper material, While the receptacles a and c as indicated may be in communication with discharge passages 38 and 39 leading to a delivery pan 38a. These delivery passages may be provided with gates 41 to prevent the introduction thereinto of spurious coins which may find their the gap between the poles of the magnet, and

when this occurs, they will be subjected to dislodgment by the wiper arm 28 which, previously havin been set in the dotted line position indicate in Figure 1, will descend through the magnetic field when the circuit is closed by the time switch through the shunt circuit to cause the actuation of the resetting mechanism and hence the opening of the circuit through the solenoid 14 and electro-magnet 11 by the return of the circuit closing element 2O to its normal "position as indicated in full lines;

fn addition to the means above described to insure .the entrance into the receptacle b and the chute or passage 37 of only those coins which pass the dimensional test determined by the circuit closing arm 20 and the magnetic field at 12, by causing the diversion of other coins to the receptacles or c, it is desirable to providel means for guarding against the entrance to the receptacle b of coins which, being of less than the proper diameter pass downward through the chute' 10 without being affected by the magnetic field owing to the fact that the circuit closer 20 is not actuated and therefore the circuit through the electro-magnet is not closed. To this end there is provided a supple-mental receptacle d, shown in the drawing as located at one side of the receptacle 7) and communicating with a passage 42 also leading to the discharge passage 38vand the pan 38, and a deflector 43 movably mounted with relation to the receptacles b and d and normally positioned to close or cut off access to the receptacle b and direct. coins into the receptacle d. This deflector which consists in the construction illustrated of a small plate or leaf is hinged at 44 and is connected with the core 45 of a solenoid 46 includedby the br`anch conductor 47 inthe main circuit represented by the conductor 16, said solenoid core being yieldingly held in position to maintain the 'defiector in clos'- ing relation with the receptacle b by means of a spring 48.

When a coin is introduced into 'the chute` 10 which by reason of its dimensions fails to actuate the circuit closer 20 and therefore fails to close the circuit through the electromagnet 11, it will drop Udirectly and unimpeded through the magnetic field represented at12 and instead of finding its way into vthe proper coin-receptacle b it will by means of the deflector 43 be diverted into the receptacle 0l and thus carried into the outlet passage 38 and returned to the operator.' On the other hand when the circuit closer 2O is properly actuatedby a coin of the correct dimensions, so as to close the circuit 16 and energize the electro-magnet 11, the. solenoid 46 will be correspondingly energized and vthe defiector plate will be moved to the position indicated in dotted lines in Figure 4, toreXpose the proper coin receptacle b so that if the magnetic conditions are satisfied, by reason of the coin being of the proper material, the latter will be depositedin the coin receptacle b and thus will pass into the vending machine for the operation of the mechanism thereof.

The forward or circuit closer engaging end of the solenoid core 30 forming a partl of the resetting mechanism is formed of a non magnetic material as indicated at 30, and the circuit closing arm 2O is pivoted below its center of gravity and in such relation to its terminal points of rest, as shown respectively by dotted and full lines, that a comparatively slight but sharp jar in the proper direction will cause it to move from oneposition to the other.

ln the illustrated and preferred embodiment of the invention the poles of the magnet 11 are directed toward each other at opposite sides of the chute 10 or path of a. coin inserted in the chute and are reduced or tapered, particularly as illustrated in Figure 4 of the drawings to the end that the effect of the' magnet upon the coin is directed to the lower or advanced portion thereof as will be seen by reference to'Figure 1 wherein the coin is shown in dotted lines. The reduced terminals are indicated at 50 and prevented from moving towards each other bythe bracing clamp 51 shown in Figures 4 and 7, so that coins passing between said terminals will not/be crowded.

Also in order to secure the effective operation of the switch closer 20 by a coin traversing the chute 10, the upper portion of the latter is preferably provided with a return elbow 1()a which has the effect of defiecting a. coin outwardly or in the direction indicated by the arrow in Figure 1 after coming into 'Contact with the extremity of said circuit closer and causing it to traverse an indirect or circuitous path affording a sufficient length of time between the engagement of the coin with the circuit closer and the presentation of the-coin at the terminals of the magnet 11 to allow for the building up of the magnetic field in the gap so that the coin may properly be affected by the magnet and thus caused to follow the desired path after reaching said gap. It is necessary that 'a coin in traversing the chute and before reaching the'magnetic field shall attain or accumulate a certain momentum in order that the effect of the field thereon may be such as to 'securevthe desired result in distribution or deposit of coins or slugs of different material and such accumulation is attained by disposing the lower portion 10b of the chute in a downwardly inclined position which however insures a sufficient contact with the lower side of the chute to insure a rotary or revoluble movement of the coin to the end that the latter is so actuated while passing through the gapy between the poles or tips of the magnet.

Having thus described the invention, what I claim is:

1. A coin selectorhaving an electro magnet of' which the poles are separated to form an upwardly and downwardly open gap, a coin chute leading to the gap at an inclination to effect a rolling movement ofl a coin traversing the same, a circuit-,including said electro magnet and a source of energy and a switch having a dimensionally selective circuit closing element arranged in the path of a coin traversing the chute.

`2. A coin selector having an electro-magnet of which the poles are separated to form a vertically open gap, a coin chute leading to the gap and inclined to effect the rolling movement of a coin traversing the same, a circuit including said electro-magnet and a source of energy,land a switch having a dimensionally selective circuit closing element terminally disposed in the path of a coin traversing the chute and consisting of a movably mounted arm.

3. A coin selector having an electro magnet forming` a magnetic field, a coin chute for revolubly delivering a coin to the magnetic field, a series of coin receptacles positioned beneath the magnetic field for the respective p reception of proper and improper coins, a circuit including said electro-magnet and a source of energy, a dimensionally selective switch having a circuit closer disposed in the path of a coin traversing the chute, a defiector yieldingly disposed to exclude coins, and defiector actuating means including a solenoi-d included in said circuit.

4. A coin selector having an electro-mag Anet providing a vertically unobstructed magnetic field, a coin chute for revolublv delivering a coin to the magnetic field, a circuit including said electro-magnet and a source of energy, a switch having a dimensionally selective circuit closing element disposed in the path of a coin traversing the chute and disposedfor movement by a proper coin to its circuit closing position, and time controlled resetting mechanism for said closing element including means actuable by the closingof theA circuit by the switch.

5. A coin selector having an electro-magnet roviding a magnetic field, a chute for revo ubly delivering a coin to said field, receptacles for respectively receiving coins after passing through said magnetic field, a circuit including said electro-magnet and a source of energy, a wiper for. traversing the magnetic field for dislodging a coin remaining therein, wiper actuating means including a solenoid included in said circuit, a switch having a circuit closing element disposed for actuating by a coin traversing the chute, and timed resetting mechanism for returning the circuit closing element to its normal posif tion.

6. A coin selector having an electro-mag net forming a magnetic field, a coin chute for revolubly delivering a coin to said magnetic field, a circuit including said magnet and a source of energy, a switch having a circuit closing element and having a solenoid of which the core is movable to actuate said circuit closing element, and a time switch having a thermostatic switch tongue controlling a shunt circuit including said solenoid.

7. A coin selector having an electro-magnet providing a vertically unobstructed magnetic field formed by the laterally separated poles of the magnet, coin receptacles arranged beneath the magnetic field, a coin chute for directing coins to the magnetic field, and acircuit including said electromagnet and a source of energy and also including a switch having a dimensionally selective closing element arranged in the ath of a coin traversing the chute, said c ute between the said circuit closing element and the magnetic fiel-d forming a coin revolving means.

8. A coin selector having an electro-magnet providing a vertically unobstructed magnetic field formed by the laterally separated poles of the magnet, coin receptacles arranged beneath the magnetic field, a coin chute for directing coins to the magnetic field, and a circuit including said electromagnet and a source of energy and also including a switch having a dimensionally selective closing element arranged in the path of a coin traversing the chute, said chute between the circuit closing element and the magnetic field being provided with coin retarding means for affording an interval sufficicnt to permit of' the building up 0f the magnetic field.

9. A coin selector having an electro-magnet providing a vertically unobstructed mag netic field formed by the laterally separated poles ofthe magnet, coin receptacles arranged beneath the magnetic field, a coin chute for directing coins to the magnetic field, and a circuit including said electromagnet and a source of energy and also including a switch having a dimensionally selective closing element arranged in the path of a coin traversing the chute, said chute between the circuit' closing element and the magnetic field being provided with coin retarding means for affording an interval sufficient to permit of the building up of the magnetic field, and having adjacent to the ,magnetic field a downwardly inclined portion for imparting momentum to the coin.

10. A c oin selector having an electro-magnet providing a vertically unobstructed magnetic field formed by the laterally separated poles ofthe magnet, coin receptacles disposed beneath the magnetic field, a coin chute for directing coins to the magnetic field, and a circuit including saidelectro-magnet and a source of energy and also including a switch having a dimensionally selective circuit closing element arranged in the path of and adapted for actuation by a coin traversing the chute, said chute between the circuit closing element and the magnetic field being adapted to direct the coin gravitally and impart rotary movement thereto.

11. A coin selector having an electro-magnet providing a vertically unobstructed mag` netic field formed by the laterally separated poles of the magnet, coin receptacles 'disposed beneath the magnetic field, a coin chute for directing coins to the magnetic field, and a circuit including said electromagnet and a source of energy and also including a switch having a dimensionally selective circuit closing element arranged in the p-ath of and adapted for actuation by a coin traversing the chute, said chute adjacent tov said circuit closing element and between the same and the magnetic field being provided With means Jfor retarding the movement of a coin traversing the same and be? ing provided adjacent to the magnetic eld with means for accelerating the movement of the coin.

l2. A coin selector having an electro-magnet providing a vertically unobstructed magnetic field formed by the laterally separated poles of' the magnet, coin receptacles disposed beneath the magnetic field, a coin chute for directing coins to the magnetic field, and a circuit inclu-ding said electro-magnet and a source `of energyV and also including a switch having a dimensionally selective circuit closing element arranged in the path of and adapted for said circuit element and between the same and the magnetic field being provided with means for retarding the movement of a coin traversing the same and being provided adjacent to the magnetic fiel-d with means for accelerating the movement of and imparting avrevoluble movement to the coin, to the end that the coin will rotatein its passage through the magnetic field.

In testimony whereof I affix my signature in presence of two witnesses.

DAVID HENDRICKSON. Witnesses:

L. R. SMITH, E. M. BECKER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2539855 *Aug 20, 1945Jan 30, 1951Raymond T MoloneyCoin chute
US2748346 *Jun 7, 1954May 29, 1956Western Electric CoApparatus for testing articles
US3096864 *Nov 7, 1957Jul 9, 1963Reed Electromech CorpCoin selector device
US4733766 *Dec 4, 1985Mar 29, 1988Mars, Inc.Coin checking apparatus
US4984670 *Feb 1, 1989Jan 15, 1991Maytag CorporationCoin drop assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification194/317, 194/321, 194/345
Cooperative ClassificationG07D5/08, G07D5/00
European ClassificationG07D5/08, G07D5/00