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Publication numberUS1428928 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 12, 1922
Filing dateDec 5, 1917
Priority dateDec 5, 1917
Publication numberUS 1428928 A, US 1428928A, US-A-1428928, US1428928 A, US1428928A
InventorsSmith Whaley William B
Original AssigneeAmerican Whaley Engine Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic safety valve
US 1428928 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. B. S. WHVALEY. AUTOMATIC SAFETY VALVE..

APPLICATION FILED DECIS. 1917.

Pmnmsept. I2, 1922.

PATENT FFM.

WILLIAM B. SMITH tVHLE-Y, OF lVLLDEN, MASSACHUSETTS, ASSIGNOR TO AMER- ICAN WI-IALEY ENGINE COMPANY, 0E' 330STON, MASSACHUSETTS, A CORPORATION 0F MASSACHUSETTS.

AUTOMATIC SAFETY VALVE.

Application led December 5, 1917. Serial No. 205,706.

To all tolto/m 'it may concern:

Be it known that I, lvViLLiAM B. SMrrI-i. VVHALEY, a citizen the United States of America, and resident of llalden, in the county of Middlesex and State of Messachusetts, have invented a new and useful Automatic Safety Valve, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to an automatic safety valve adapted inore'particularly for automatically scavenging and regulating the air pressure in air tanks and to prevent pocketing of the air therein. This is particularly the case where said tank has a single or common inlet and outlet or intake and discharge means. The air delivered by the pump to a storage pressure tank always contains entra-ined particles of lubricating oil which, by reason Vof a lack of circulating means, pockets at points beyond the said common inlet and outlet; that is, the oil collects at the lowest point in the tank with pocketed or unliberated air, and earbureted air results, which is a source of extreme danger. rlChis, together with the static electricity provided by the friction of the air against the metal of the tank, is one of the most common causes of explosions of air tanks. Scavenging the tank of oil or oil vapors is therefore most important, and this invention is designed to accomplish scavengingby the delivery of the air to the top of the tank and removing the air from the bottom of the tank where pocketing is most likely to take place. This is done by a single valve which also automatically tends to maintain a constant pressure within the tank. Certain other fea-tures and advantages in connection with the use, application or operation of the invention will be pointed out in the description hereinafter.

In order to illustrate my invention, .l have shown in the accompanying drawing one embodiment thereof, wherein Fig. 1 illustrates an elevation partly broken away, of a storage tank or receptacle with a valve of my invention applied thereto and (.rooperating with air or gas supply means and utilization means illustrated diagrammatically.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged. central vertical section through a valve of my invention.

The terms employed herein are used in the generic and descriptive sense to desigor shape best adapted to have embodied therein the elements and operating mechanisms adapted to carry out the principles andl objects of said invention. To facilitate the construction of the device, the top of said f body 16 has an opening at 17 and closing the same is a head 18 secured thereto by the bolts 19. Within the said body 16 is the enclosing cylindrical wall 22 to form a central chamber 23 having leading thereto a conduit 24 in communication therewith. Said chamber and conduit 24 are common to both the inlet and outlet of air as described hereinafter. Leading from said chamber 23 is an outlet port 25 preferably surrounded by a valve seat 26 and communicating with the conduit 28 between the body 16 and wall 22. The conduit 28 communicates directly with the interior of the tank 1() through the opening 12 at the top thereof. i

The port 25 is normally closed by the valve 30 engaging the valve seat 36. Said valve is preferably held to said seat by a spring 31 surrounding the rtubular valve stem 32, preferably integral with the valve and slidable in the bore 33 within the eX- tension 34 projecting centrally of the head 18. The said spring 31 engages and is compressed between the top surface of said valve 30 and the lower face of the head 18.

From a position close to the bottom of the tank 10 the open end of an exten ded conduit 35 leads upwardly through the tank and is fastened into the boss of the discharge port 37 communicating with the chamber lnteriorly of the said chamber 23 the discharge port 37 is surrounded by the valve seat 38. Said discharge port is normally closed by the valve 40 in contact with said valve seat 38. Centrally of said valve, and preferably integral therewith, is a valve stem L11v preferably guided in the bore 4:2 in the tubular valve stem 32. Surrounding said valve stern 4-1 and bearing on the top surface of the valve @and the under surface ofthe valve 30 is a spring tt adapted' normally to hold said valve to its valve seat 38.

The exposed area of the upper surface of the valve i0 is equal to the areaof the valve 30 likewise exposed within the chamber The area of the lower face of the valve 4e() exposed to the interior of the tank i0 and the pressure therein,'is of less diameter than the area of the upper surface of the valve 30 exposed to the pressure interiorly of the said tank. Itis also .pointed out thatthe coinpression value of the spring t4 is half that of the spring 3l, F or example7 the spring te may be termed for convenience a [ive pound spring under ycompression as com,- pared to thespring 3l termed aten pound spring.

The conduit 24 beingy common to both intake and discharge of air from saidtank, the said-conduit is Iypreferably connected to an Vair compressor oran fair pump herein bustion engine type, 4preferably having ya tion stroke;

positivelyactuated .valve adapted to permit of the admissionofair toa yreservoir of lthe engine and from there drawn into the engine through a poppet valve during the'suc- The engine in part illustrated is of the retardedcombustion type, wherein air is admittedlate in the cycle of combustion .to complete the same. y

. It Vwill be. understood, however, .that any .other'typeof prime mover maybeutilized in connection with the invention, as vfor example, other internal combustion engines, compressedfair motors or air operatedtools and implements. Therefore,a large volume :reservoir or `tank is desirable and the valve has its particular application to suchtank.

The operation of theinveiition is as fol-l lows: The air is compressedvby the pump i5 and flowsthroughthe vconduits i6 and 4:7 atri-lach alternate stroke of the piston vin the pump.

The air is `conducted through the conduit .2f-l intothe chamber 23 in the valve. .The valve t() isunaintained in contact with itsseat'both by reason of the pressure upon the top sur-` face thereof and by the assistance .of the springe. rthe valve 30,however, is caused toinove from its seat26 permitting the air to pass through the port 25 into the con- The prime mover Leashes the tank 10. Attention is again directedto the fact that this entering air is delivered at the top of the tank and .cannot return through the port 25 and -pass the valve 30 but must flow to thebottoin of the tank and pass upwardly through the conduit 35.v

The pump continues to operate and coinpress and force into the conduit new air. and if the air pressure within the tank s less than that flowing through or maintained in the conduit 24e thevalve 30 will move from its sea-t until such time the two pressures will become equal. Now, if during the course of the operation of the prime mover, more air is required thereby, as for starting purposes, or the pressure inthe conduit becomes less than that in said tank as when the air pump is shut off and the conduit 2st is open to thenprime mover or .engine l5G duringthe end of the piston stroke when'the pressure in the cylinder is low or when the conduit 24 `is open ,to the cylinder during exhaust, air will passup through the conduit 35 to the porty 3.7 causing lthe valve t() to recede from its seat' permittingthe .coinpressed air to flow into thesaid conduit 24 and therealong to the prime ,mover 50 until such time as the pressure of the air within said conduit exceeds that within the tank.

The valve 4:0 .willjtlien reseat itself and during the next few strokes of the engine the vali/e730 will tend to recede from its seat 26, permitting `airto again enter the conduit 28 thence to thetank jlO to vrestore the pressui'e therein tothemaximum pressure.

ils lubricatingoil-froin'thecompressor' or pump t5 is being constantly. entrained in 'the air andinust necessarilyfind its way intoth-e tank l0, f it is always directed by vthe flow of the air to the bottom of the tank whereit is drawn up through the conduit 35 and-port 37 past the valve 40 tothe conduit 2ewhere it will flow therealongito the prime mover Y 50 where it'ivill be taken up in the .combustion cycle or operation of the engine. Therefore, no substantialquantity of oil can' be,-

come entrained or deposited within thetank t 10 to induce sufficient carbure'ted air therein to be dangerous. Y

The friction resulting `from the {iowof air through a `metal container or conduit 'frequently causes a static charge of electricity upon the metal, which is a constant source of danger. A sudden change of the static condition, `either. by some unforeseen premature or accidental grounding'of some part` of the metal or change of electrical capacity thereof, will cause a sparkto are f between the metal parts interiorly ofthe container. If no appreciable amount of carbureted air is present, no dangerous effect vcan be had. Gn the other hand, a properly proportioned mixture of carbureted air within the container will be viis iired by the discharge of the static charge of electricity, and thereby cause combustion resulting in the bursting of the container. These are conditions frequently met with where said container or tank has but a single inlet and discharge orifice, valve, valve conduit, or the like. By reason of the use of a valve of my invention, the air is delivered at one portion of the tank andl discharged at another portion to eventually repass through the same valve and maintain a constant circulation thereof. Therefore, the dangerous conditions above referred to cannot occur, and likewise, the valve tends automatically to control the inlet and discharge of air to the container with constant circulation thereof and to maintain the air at practically constant pressure.

This valve may be utilized in connection with any tank designed for a storage 0f compressed air, gas or the like, employing but a single inlet and outlet member, as for example, portable tanks, carbonous gas tanks utilized for the manufacture of beverages, tanks for the storage of air for the operation of air operated tools or machinery, or tanks adapted to hold an illuminating gas or the like. Many other applications may be readily understood by those skilled in the art and the advantages of a. valve of the principles set forth herein, when supplied thereto, will be readily appreciated.

No check valves or adjusting features are required by the use and 'application of said valve. Likewise, there cannot be any invitation to tamper with the same to change its operation and control of the air passing therethrough. There is no provision for regulating means as the valve is entirely automatic in its operation and control of the air, gas or the like.

I have described herein one embodiment of my invention, but it is to be understood that the latter is not essentially limited to the specific construction and organization of said embodiment, since the same may be varied without departing from the proper scope of the claims.

The term gas in the specification and claims includes any elastic iiuid or medium.

Having thus described my invention in detail, what I claim as new is:

l. The combination of a tank having an opening and an extended conduit therein and a valve comprising a casing, a wall therein to provide an interior chamber, said casing and wall being spaced to form a conduit therebetween adapted to communicate with the interior of said tank through said opening, said wall having a plurality of ports therethrough in communication with the said chamber, one of said ports being in communication with said last mentioned conduit and the other port communicating with said extended conduit projecting to a distant portion of the said tank, a valve for each port, and means communicating with the interior of said chamber to permit the passage of a gas to and from said chamber.

2. In a valve, a casing, a wall therein to provide an interior chamber and a conduit between the casing and wall, said wall being provided with a port surrounded by a valve seat and communicating with said conduit, an extended conduit having an opening distant from the first mentioned conduit and communicating with the interior chamber through a port surrounded by a valve seat, a valve normally engaging each valve seat to close each port and a common intake and discharge conduit in communication with said interior chamber.

3. In a valve, a casing, a wall therein to provide an interior chamber and a conduit between the casing and wall, said wall being provided with a port surrounded by a valve seat and communicating with said conduit, an extended conduit having an opening distant from the first mentioned conduit and communicating with the interior chamber through a port surrounded by a valve seat, a valve normally engaging each valve seat to close each port, a common intake and discharge conduit in communication with said interior chamber, and springs adapted to maintain said valves on their respective seats.

4. In combination with a tank, a valve having a casing provided with means for directing a compressed gas to one end of lsaid tank and for withdrawing said compressed gas from a distant end of said tank, a common gas intake and discharge means for said casing and valve mechanisms adapted to control the flow of gas between said common intake and discharge. and the said directing means and the said withdrawing means.

5. In combination with a tank, a valve having a casing provided with conduit means for delivering compressed gas to said tank at a point adjacent to the casing and provided also with an extended conduit projecting within said tank for withdrawing the said gas from said tank at a point distant from said delivery means, a common gas intake and discharge means for said casing, and one way valve mechanisms adapted to permit the passage of a gas from the said common intake and discharge to the delivery means and to permit withdrawal of gas from said extended conduit to the said common intake and discharge.

6. In combination with a tank, a valve having a casing, means within said casing for delivering a gas to said tank at a point adjacent to the casing and for withdrawing the gas from said tank at a point distant from said delivery means, said casing having a common intake and discharge means for a gas, and valve mechanism in said easing controlling the direction of flow lrom said common intake and discharge means -tofsaid delivery means and for controlling the direction of flow Yfrom the vithdrawal means to the saidv common intake and discharge.

7. ln a scavenging valve apparatus, 'a storage tank, a single valve mechanism for said tankcontrolling both the intake and Withdrawal of a gas therefrom, said valve comprising a casing having means lor delivering a gas to the interior ot the tank at the top and means extended to the bottom oi' said'tank for the withdrawal of the gas therefrom, means for delivering a gas to and from said casing and adapted to be connected to the source of gas supply and to means to the interior of the tank, and yfor utilizing the said'gas and a valve mechanism in said casing adapted to direct the flow of said gas from said delivery means to direct the flow of said gas from the lower Withdrawal means to the discharge means.

S. In a valve, a casing having a central chamber, a valvewithin said chamber for admitting a gas thereto, a valve exterior to said chamber for delivering a gas therefrom, and means communicating with said valves for delivering` a gas from said chamber and admitting a gas thereto at points distant one from the other.

9. In a valve, a casing having a chamber therein provided with av set of valve ports communicating therewith and surrounded by' valve seats, a pair 'of adjacent valves movable in the same direction -to' uncover` said seats surrounding said ports communieating with said chamber for admitting and delivering a gas to and from said chamber at points distantI one from the other, and means 'for admitting a gas to said chamber from a source of supply.

WILLIAM B. SMITH WHALEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3288321 *Mar 20, 1964Nov 29, 1966Wokas Albert LStorage of petroleum products
US4702416 *Oct 28, 1985Oct 27, 1987Pagliai Ferro DAgitator regulator valve
US4768714 *Mar 28, 1986Sep 6, 1988Luchsinger Pedro WPortable sprayer with leak control and agitator
US4773444 *Nov 21, 1986Sep 27, 1988Bleth Joel JDual directional relief valve
US4798333 *Jul 24, 1987Jan 17, 1989Luchsinger Pedro WPortable sprayer with improved combination of piston and diaphragm pump
US6698450Apr 4, 2002Mar 2, 2004Gardner Denver, Inc.Discharge valve
US7004195Jan 26, 2004Feb 28, 2006Gardner Denver, Inc.Discharge valve
US8074679Dec 21, 2006Dec 13, 2011Gardner Denver, Inc.Y-type fluid end with replaceable suction module
US20040226616 *Jan 26, 2004Nov 18, 2004Vicars Berton L.Discharge valve
US20040234404 *May 20, 2003Nov 25, 2004Vicars Berton L.Fluid end assembly
US20080152523 *Dec 21, 2006Jun 26, 2008Ernest Jerome JensenY-type fluid end with replaceable suction module
US20100288959 *May 12, 2009Nov 18, 2010Vicars Berton LDischarge valve
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/493.9, 137/590, 123/65.00B, 137/541
International ClassificationF16K17/04
Cooperative ClassificationF16K17/044
European ClassificationF16K17/04G