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Publication numberUS1429240 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 19, 1922
Filing dateFeb 24, 1920
Priority dateFeb 24, 1920
Publication numberUS 1429240 A, US 1429240A, US-A-1429240, US1429240 A, US1429240A
InventorsHanson Earl C, Jones Edward T
Original AssigneeHanson Earl C, Jones Edward T
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Radiosignaling system
US 1429240 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. C. HANSON AND E. T. JONES.

RADIOSIGNALING SYSTEM.

APPLICATION FILED FEB.24. 1920.

1 ,429,240.- PIIIenIedsepI/I., 19, 1922.

2 SHEETS-SHEET l.

F/G. E

E. C. HANSON AND E. T. JONES.

RADIOSIGNALING SYSTEM.

APPLICATION FILED Imm, 1920.

Patented Sept. 19, 1922.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

. ...IIIIIIJIIII u Patented Sept. 19,- 1922.`

- UNITED sr 1 oFFlcE.

EARL C. HANSON, OF'WASHINGTON, DISTRICT 0F COLUMBIA, AND EDWARD T.' JONES,

0F NEW QRLEANS, LOUISIANA.

RADIOSIGNALDIG SYSTEM.l

Application mea February 24, 1920. sel-131 No. 361,062..

To all whom t may concern Be it known that we, EARL C. HansoN, a citizen of the United States, resldmg at .Washington, District of Columbia, andl EDWARD T. JONES, a -citizen of the United States, vresiding at New Orleans', in the parish of Orleansand State of Louisiana, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Radiosignaling Systems, of which the following is a specification.

Our invention relates to underground or subterraneous antenna systems and more particularly to the construction of antennae of this character.

One object of the invention is to provide an underground antenna system applicable forI installation wi-thin a limited area. A further object of the invention is to provide means for varying the constants of the antennee by directl modifying the capacityof ,the antenna col ector's.

Our invention will be more clearly understood by Jreference to the accompanying drawing, in which-V .Figure 1 shows 'diagrammatically oneform of concentrated ground antennae to be used in carrying out the invention; Figure 2 shows in detail the construction of the antenna plates shown in- Figure l; and Figure 3 shows diagrammatically aVv modification of the ground antennee'with means for`varying the capacity constant of the same. 4

Referring now more particularly to Figure 1, reference characters 1L and 2 represent metallic antenna plates surrounded by any suit- Fable dielectric encasements 3 vand 4 which are enclosed in casings 5 and 6. The casings 5 and 6 may be constructed of metallic or nonmetallic material. The insulated ant-enna leads 7 and 8 pass through insulating bushings 11 and 12 in the top of casings' and 6, and are connected electrically to the plates 1. and 2. .The inductance 9 in the antenna circuit is coupled through the inductance 10 to any suitable radio transmitting or receiving apparatus.

Figure 2 shows in perspectivethe concentrated antenna plates shown in Figure 1. InFigure 3 reference characters 1 and 2 are rotatable plates of the antenna system, corresponding to the stationary type disl closed in Figure 1'. These plates are mounted upon conducting rods 7a and 8a, and are adapted to be intermeshed with stationary plates 4f* and 5a. `The' stationary plates 4a and 5a, and movable plates 1 and 2 haye substantlally the same general relation as'theV (pilates of the well known rotary variable conenser used 1n the radio art. The plates 4 and 5a form a p art of the outer casing of the antennae which is in direct contact with the earth. v y

Any suitable dielectric separates the plates, as for example, air or oil'. The conducting rods 7a and 8l which support the variable condenser plates 1 and 2 pass through protective tubes 11a and 12a to the surface ofthe ground. Operating handles 149 and 15 arefrigidly secured to the rods 7 a and 8a to provide a meansfor rotating the ,series of plates 1 and 2. Leads 7 and 8 conparatus.

Experiments have determined that antenna construction similar to thosedisclosed i herein possess features of distinct advantage over underground systems heretofore employed. The concentrated capacity aream gives the same effective antenna surface as long buried single ,wire conductors and give substantially the same signal energy as the long buried conductors. It has been found experimentally, that placing the capacity antenna areas a distance of approximately fifty best results are obtained by using smaller antenna capacity areas and therefore-the variable antenna capacity systenishown in Figure 3 may be utilized for a wide range of wave lengths.- Where stations are required for operation on predetermined wave lengths definite capacity areas may be employed as in Figures 1 and 2.v However, where it is `necessary for stations to communicate with numbers of Astations operating at various wave lengths the means such as shown 1n` 'Figure 3 may be used to change the effective area of the capacity to obtain syntony with the vco-operating station.

In the practical operation of the system 1t may be. found advantageous tohave the antenna capacities placed directly beneath the.

l stations.

vhat We claim is l. A radio transmission and reception system comprising an antenna including a plurality of sets of capacity areas buried below the surface of the earth, means for varying their mutual capacit-y Withthe earth and a circuit associated with radio signaling apparatus and connected with said sets of capacity areas.

. 2.. In a radio transmission and reception system, an antenna comprising a pair of capacity units buried in the earth each unit including a plurality of movable plates and associa-ted stationary plates insulated therefrom and means for changing the relative position of the plates.

3. In a radio transmission and reception of metallic plates mounted on a rotatable shaft and interineshed -With said first nientioned plates but insulated therefrom Whereby the relative position of the two sets of plates may be varied and a circuit associated with radio signaling apparatus 'connecting said sets of rotatable plates.

EARL C. HANSO-N. EDWARD T. JONES.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2901687 *Sep 30, 1950Aug 25, 1959Engineering Res CorpMethod and apparatus for ground-wave transmission and reception of radio waves
US3265972 *Apr 10, 1962Aug 9, 1966Paul CurryUnderwater electric field communication system
US3680133 *Jun 8, 1970Jul 25, 1972Raytheon CoSubsurface traveling wave antenna
US4502009 *Jan 19, 1982Feb 26, 1985Societe Nationale Industrielle AerospatialeApparatus adapted for single pulse electromagnetic measurements of soil conductivity and dielectric constant
US4809010 *Jun 23, 1982Feb 28, 1989Canon Kabushiki KaishaLow profile wireless communication system and method
US4825224 *Sep 2, 1986Apr 25, 1989Eyring Research Institute, Inc.Broad band impedance matching system and method for low-profile antennas
US4829310 *Jun 23, 1982May 9, 1989Eyring Research Institute, Inc.Wireless communication system using current formed underground vertical plane polarized antennas
US4839661 *Oct 9, 1984Jun 13, 1989Eyring Research Institute, Inc.Guided wave antenna system and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification343/719, 343/845, 343/899
International ClassificationH01Q1/04, H01Q1/00
Cooperative ClassificationH01Q1/04
European ClassificationH01Q1/04