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Publication numberUS1431652 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 10, 1922
Filing dateFeb 14, 1921
Priority dateFeb 14, 1921
Publication numberUS 1431652 A, US 1431652A, US-A-1431652, US1431652 A, US1431652A
InventorsGrossman Samuel M
Original AssigneeGrossman Samuel M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making finger rings
US 1431652 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

S. M. G RO SSWIAN. \.r, METHQD Qf MAKING FINGER RINGS. APPLICATIQN FILED FEB. 14, 1921.

nmm m Patented 00m. 19220 body is made of To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that ll, SAMUEL M. GRossMAN, a citizen of the United States, residin at hicago, in the county of Cook and tate of Illinois, have invented new and useful Improvements in Method of Making Finger Rings, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to finger rings, and more particularly wedding rings, and the method of making the same.

One object ofmy invention is to make the ring of two separate annular parts, one being relatively thicker than the other and constituting the body of the ring, and the other part being in the form of a relatively thin'ornamental band fitted tightly in an outwardly opening channel in the rin body with the band fitting between the side anges of the channel and being substantially flush with the outer surface of the ring body on op osite sides of the channel.

nother object of the invention is to have the ornamental band fit tightly in the channel Without the use of solder, this being accomplished by varying the diameter of the ring body and band relatively to each other after the band has been applied in the channel, thus holding the hand against circumferential movement with respect to the ring body.

A further object of my invention is to cut 'out the side edges of the band to conform to the design on which the band is fashioned so that the bottom of the channel may be visible on opposite sides of the band, and thus furnish a background for the band and set off the same, especially when the ring one color, say green gold, and the band is made of a contrasting color, as for instance white gold.

Uther and further objects of the invention will appear from the following specification, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in whic Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a finger rin' made in accordance with my invention;

. igs. 2 to 5 inclusive illustrate the respective steps followed in making the ring by the method of my invention;

Fig. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary top plan view of the ring showni'n the preceding figures after the ring body and band have .been fitted together; and

Fig. 7 is an enlarged side elevational view of a ring, with a port on n section, showing Serial No. 444,683.

an ornamental band applied in the channel 1n the side of the ring, as well as around the outer circumference of the same. v The finger ring of my invention is made in two separate annular parts 1 and 2, the former being relatively thicker than the latter and constituting the body ofthe ring. -As shown in the'drawings, the ring body 1' is provided with an outwardly opening cha nel 3 extending completely about the outside of the ring body and having side flanges 4, 4, annular in form and projecting radially outward substantially the same distance.

The other or outer part 2 of the ring is in the form of a relatively thin annular band having a width to fit in the channel 3 between the side flanges 4 thereof, and a diameter, w-hen first made, slightly greater than that of the bottom of the channel, as shown in Fig. 3. The outer surface of the band 2 may be chased or carved to give it any desired ornamental and and its side edges are cut in conformity.- with the design on which the band is fashioned.

After the parts 1 and 2 have been made separately and given annular form, as shown in Fig. 2, the band 2 is forced over one of the flanges 4 until it is in the channel 3 and surrounding the ring body 1, as illustrated in Fig. 3. At this time, the band 2' is slightly namental band 2 and cause it to fit tight in the channel 3. The full effect of this expansion may be gained by inserting the mandrel 5 through a hole in an anvil 6 with the ring resting thereon, as shown in Fig. 5. The upper end of the mandrel 5 is tapped with a hammer or mallet 7, shown in dotted lines in said Fig. 5, to expand the ring body 1 to the extent required. After this has been done, the edges of the ring body-1 may be filed or otherwise finished to be made smooth, and the whole-polished and buffed togive it a proper and desired finish and luster.

As shown in Fig. 6, portions of the band 2 extend across the channel 3 and engage against the side flanges 4 thereof. This holds artistic design,

' scribed.

the band 2 against lateral displacement in the channel. The side edges of the band between such portions, being cut out or carved to conform to the design on which the band is fashioned, terminate short of said flanges, and thus expose to view portions of the bottom of the channel 3 on opposite sides of the band. This has a dual purpose. First, it allows the contour of the design of the band at its sides to be readily observed and be set out, and, second, the bottom of the channel being polished and having a luster forms a background for the ornamental band to set it off with a pleasing and ornate eifect. 4

This eifect is further accentuated when the ring body 1 and band-2 are made of metals having contrastin colors, as for instance the ring body 1 0 green gold and the band 2, of white gold. Should solder be used to secure the parts together, the bottom of the channel would not form'a background for the band, because the solder on fusing would run beyond the side edges of the band and substantially, if .not wholly, fill the spaces mentioned.

In Fig. 7, I have shown an ornamental band 7 applied in an annular channel 8 in one side of a ring body 1. These parts are fitted together by expanding the ring body, in the same manner as shown in the preceding figures and as heretofore de- Applied about this ring body 1 is an ornamental band 2*, the same as before. The ring shown in Fig. 7 is thus provided with two ornamental bands, one on one side and the other about the ring. A third band could be employed by fitting the same in a channel on the opposite side of the ring.

The ring of my invention is especially applicable as a wedding ring, as the bands may be made in varied designs, now ordinarily chased on wedding rings.

While I have shown and described herein in detail a finger ring of my invention and the method by which it is made, it is to be of course understood that the details shown and described may be variously changed and modified without departing from the spirit and scope of my'invention.

I claim as my invention:

1. The method of making a finger ring, consisting in, first, making the ring in two separate annular parts, one constituting the body of the ring, and the other the ornamental band therefor, second, providing the ring body with an annular channel having side flanges, third, applying the band in the channel between said flanges, and, fourth, causing the band to fit tight in the channel in the ring body by varying the "diameter of one with respect to the other.

2. The method of making a finger ring, consisting in, first, making the ring in two separate annular parts, one constituting the body of the ring and the other the ornamental band therefor, second, providing said I ring body with an annular channel extending about the outer circumference of the same and having side flanges, tl1i1d,f01'cing said band over one of said side flanges into said channel, and, fourth, causing the band to fit tight against the bottom of said channel by varying the diameter of the band and ring body relatively to each other.

3. The method of making a finger ring, consisting in, first, making the ring in two separate annular parts, one constituting the body of the ring and the other the ornamental band therefor, second, providing said ring body with an annular channel extending about the outer circumference of the same and having side flan es, third, forcing said band over' one of sai side flanges into said channel, and, fourth, expanding the ring body into tight contact with the band.

In testimony that I claim the foregoing as my invention, I afli'x my signature this 8th day of Februar A. D. 1921.

SAMU L M. GROSSMAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4493196 *Sep 15, 1983Jan 15, 1985Max BognerRing construction and method of making same
US6295732May 26, 1999Oct 2, 2001Ofiesh, Ii Gabriel D.Method of manufacturing a jewelry ring
US6497117Jul 9, 2001Dec 24, 2002Ofiesh, Ii Gabriel D.Jewelry ring
US6990736 *Apr 8, 2003Jan 31, 2006Trent WestMethods for preparing jewelry articles comprising sintered tungsten carbide
US6993842Apr 8, 2003Feb 7, 2006Trent WestMethods and jewelry articles comprising sintered tungsten carbide
US7032314Aug 5, 2003Apr 25, 2006Trent WestMethods of making tungsten carbide-based annular jewelry rings
US7076972Aug 5, 2003Jul 18, 2006Trent WestTungsten carbide-based annular jewelry article
US7464468 *May 1, 2006Dec 16, 2008S. Will International Co., LtdStructure for inlaying precious metal in an outer peripheral surface of a ring and method for manufacturing a ring inlaid with precious metal in an outer peripheral surface
US7761996Feb 6, 2006Jul 27, 2010Trent WestMethods of making tungsten carbide-based annular jewelry rings
US8061033Jul 27, 2010Nov 22, 2011Trent WestMethods of making tungsten carbide-based annular jewelry rings
US8584360Nov 21, 2011Nov 19, 2013Trent WestMethods of making tungsten carbide-based annular jewelry rings
Classifications
U.S. Classification29/8, D11/38
International ClassificationB21D53/44, B21D53/00
Cooperative ClassificationB21D53/44
European ClassificationB21D53/44