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Publication numberUS1434068 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 31, 1922
Filing dateFeb 23, 1922
Priority dateFeb 23, 1922
Publication numberUS 1434068 A, US 1434068A, US-A-1434068, US1434068 A, US1434068A
InventorsJulius H Schlafly
Original AssigneeUnited Alloy Steel Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making corrugated cores
US 1434068 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Oct. 31, 1922.,

J. H. SCHLAFLY. METHOD OF MAKING CORRUGATED CORES.

Patented @ct. 3i, lQZE.

JULIUS H. SCHLAFLY, OF CANTON, OHIO, ASSIGNOR T0 UNITED ALLOY STEEL CORPO- RATION, OF CANTON,

OHIO, A CORPORATION OF NEW YORK.

METHOD OF MAKING CORRUGATED OORES.

AppIication filed February 23, 1922. Serial No. 538,783.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, JULrUs- H. SOHLAFLY, a citizen of the United States, residing at Canton, in the county of Stark and State of Ohio, have invented a certain new and useful Improved Method of Making Corrugated (lores, of which the following is a specification. v

The invention relates to the manufacture of transversely-corrugated sheet-metal cores for concrete floor construction; and the object of the improvement is to form the cores with deeper corrugations than can be made by ordinary methods, so as to increase the supporting strength of the cores.

A common method of making such cores is by a pressing or stamping operation to form the transverse corrugations at the same time the core is shaped from a plain sheet of metal, and as the length of the sheet is necessarily'shortened by the formation of the corrugations of the core, the depth to which the corrugations can be formed is limited and the supporting strength of the core is likewise limited.

The improved method involves an initial corrugation of a plain sheet so as to accumulate or gather the metal and shorten the sheet to or about the length of the finished core, a subsequent shaping of the core to form the side flanges and partially, form the arch angles while forming deep corrugations from the gathered metal, followed by a final shaping of the arch angles.

The initial corrugations can be made in any form or of any dimensions which will accumulate sufiicient metal to permit the formation of the desired deep corrugations without any considerable stretching of the metal beyond the necessary tension which .is desirable to take up all the kinks and bends there may be in the ordinary sheet; and the final corrugation of the flanges may correspond to the corrugations in the body of the core, or may be reversed at the angle of the flange in well known manner so as to increase the strength of the flanges; and both arch angles may be finally shaped by a single operation or by separate operations as may be desired.

The accompanying drawings forming a part hereof illustrate various steps which may be employed in carrying out the improved method, in which drawings- Figure 1 is a plan of a plain sheet; Fig. 2, a. plan of the same after it has been initially corrugated;

Fig. 3, an enlarged longitudinal section of the initially corrugated sheet on line TIL-III, Fig. 2, showing a like section of deep corrugating dies;

Fig. 4, a transverse section of deep corrugating and partial shaping dies, showing the sheet therein with the flange angles formed and the arch angles partly formed;

Fig. 5, a perspective section of one-half of the lower deep corrugating and partial shaping die, with half a core shaped therein;

Fig. 6, a transverse section of dies which may be used for finally shaping both arch angles by a single operation;

Fig. 7, a transverse section of dies which may be used for finally separately shaping the arch angles by successive operations and Fig. 8, a perspective view of the completed core, with reversely corrugated flanges.

Similar numerals refer to similar parts throughout the several figures of the drawlngs.

A plain sheet 9 is initially formed with transverse corrugations by any well known rolling, pressing, or stamping operation, so as to accumulate or gather the material uniformly throughout the sheet and reduce its length to substantially the length of the finished core.

The corrugations may ordinarily be made without much, if any, stretching of the metal, but for very deep corrugations, the metal can be stretched to or near its elastic limit; and the character of the corrugations may vary from the middle to the ends of the sheet, to compensate for the action of the dies in the succeeding steps of the process.

The shortened sheet 10 may have rounded corrugations 11 of about half the depth and width of the deep corrugations 12 to be finally formed, so as to accumulate the necessary metal required for the deep corrugations; but the particular shape and size of the initial corrugations, as shown in Figs. 2 and 3, are not essential to the subsequent steps of the improved method.

Complementary dies 13 and 13, as shown in Figs. 3, 4 and 5,may be employed to form the deep transverse corrugations 12 and to shape the longitudinal'angles 14 of the side flanges 15 and partially shape the longitudiformed in a continuous series throughout the length of the sheet, and the corrugations of the side flanges 15 may conform to the corrugations in the body of the core; but the flange corrugations 17, are'preferably reversed at the angle of the flange to avoid a straining or rupture of the metal at this point, and to increase the strength of the flange angle.

The partially formed longitudinal arch angles 16 may be fully formed, both at the same time by a single operation, by complementary dies 18 and 18, as shown in Fig. 6; or may be finally formed separately, by complementary dies 19 and 19', as shown in Fig. 7; thereby completing the formation of the core with deep corrugations as shown in F claim:

1. The method of making transverselycorrugated sheet-metal cores for concrete floor construction and the like, which consists in transversely corrugating a sheet to accumulate the metal uniformly throughout its length, then forming a continuous series of deeper corrugations from the accumulated metal and shaping the sheet to form flarilges along the sides and an intermediate arc 2. The method of making transverselycorrugated sheet-metal cores for concrete floor construction and the like, which consists in transversely corrugating a sheet to accumulate the metal uniformly throughout its length, then forming a continuous series of deeper corrugations from the accumulated metal and contemporaneously shaping the sheet to form flanges along the sides and an intermediate arch.

3. The method of making transversely corrugated sheet-metal cores for concrete floor construction and the like, which consists in transversely corrugating a sheet to accumulat the metal uniformly throughout its length, then forming a continuous series of deeper corrugations from the accumulated its length then forming a continuous series of deeper corrugations from the accumulated metal and shaping the sheet to fully form fiange angles along the sides and to partly form intermediate arch angles, and then fully forming the .intermediate arch angles.

5. The method of making transverselycorrugated sheet-metal cores for concrete floor construction and the like, which consists in transversely corrugating a sheet to accumulate the metal throughout its length, then forming a continuous series of deeper corrugations from the accumulated metal and shaping the sheet to form flanges along the sides and an intermediate arch.

JULIUS H. SCHLAFLY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2441517 *Mar 16, 1946May 11, 1948Julius L SussmanMeans for shaping metal articles
US2693842 *Sep 16, 1947Nov 9, 1954Houdaille Hershey CorpEvaporator forming machine
US2776678 *Jun 4, 1953Jan 8, 1957Contemporary Metals IncWire bending machine for the bending of a wire or the like
US3111788 *Jul 18, 1960Nov 26, 1963Paul OuelletRoof panel
US3192670 *Jun 22, 1962Jul 6, 1965Jones Iii Lee BRoofing connector plate
US4220031 *Jun 17, 1977Sep 2, 1980Groko Maskin AbMethod for bending section-sheet, plate strip and like material
US4331018 *May 6, 1980May 25, 1982Keeton Sons & Co. Ltd.Folding machine
US4347726 *Nov 6, 1979Sep 7, 1982Groko Maskin AbMethod and device for bending sheet-metal sections
US20100012669 *Jul 15, 2008Jan 21, 2010Delta Consolidated IndustriesPanels for a Container Joint Including a Three Dimensional Pattern on a Portion Thereof and Methods of Forming Same
Classifications
U.S. Classification72/379.6
International ClassificationB21D13/02
Cooperative ClassificationB21D11/08, B21D11/206, B21D13/02
European ClassificationB21D11/08, B21D11/20B, B21D13/02