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Publication numberUS1435130 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 7, 1922
Filing dateAug 31, 1920
Publication numberUS 1435130 A, US 1435130A, US-A-1435130, US1435130 A, US1435130A
InventorsT. Hogan
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
hogaw
US 1435130 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. T. HOGAN. ORE GRINDING DISK. APPLICATION FILED AUG.31. 1920.

I Patented Nov. 7, 1922.

1,4L35J 3G.

IN VEN TOR.

Patented I Nov. 7', 1922.

iii rats JOHN T. HOG-AN, OF DENVER, COLORADO.

ORE-GRINDING DISK.

Application filed August 31, 1920. SerialNo. 407,097.

To'allwhom it may concern.

Be it known that 1, JOHN T. HOGAN, a citizen of the United States. residing at Denver, in the county of Denver and State of Colorado (whose post-oflice address 389 S. Los Angeles Street, Los Angeles, California), have invented new and useful Ore-Grinding Disks, of which the following is a specification. ,v I,

My invention relates to an improvement in ore grinding disks, in which material is ground between the ridged and grooved faces of two disks, which may be horizontal or vertical, and of which usually only one revolves; and the object of my improvement is to take advantage of the centrifugal force which is inherent in the operation of this class of grinding machines to provide improved and effective means for advancing the material from the inlet to the point of discharge so as to insure a gradual and rapid grinding of the same.

I attain these results by the mechanism illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which Fig. 1 is a vertical half section of the stationary disk; F ig. 2 .a vertical half sec tion of the revolving disk; Fig. 3 a view of the grinding face of the stationary disk; Fig. 4 a transverse section of one of the ridges on the line 4, 4, in Fig. 2, and Fig. 5, the grinding face of the revolving disk.

Similar letters refer to similar parts throughout the several views.

The orifice O, in Fig. 1 and Fig. 3, is the opening through which the material to be ground is introduced between the disks, the flat finishing surface adjacent to the circumference being indicated by The ridges are indicated by R and the grooves by G.

The revolving disk. which is shown in Figs. 2 and 5 differs from the stationary disk only in that there is no opening in the center thereof.

Both the ridges and grooves acquire de clivity as they leave the flat surface and ap proach the center. As can be seen in Fig. 4:, the ridges have a flat surface and a slope on one side so that material can get between them and are vertical on the other side so that the material reduced in size can drop into the following groove. The direction of rotation of the revolving disk is shown by the arrow in Fig. 5.

In operation the stationary disk is brought against the revolving disk and the material.

.put and consuming power.

to be ground is introduced through the open mg in the stationary disk. The large pieces of ore are broken at the center of the disks and are advanced by centrifugal force towards the circumference, being gradually reduced in size as the result of the decreas ing space between the disks. Heretofore only radial ridges and grooves .have been employed in ore grinding disks and as centrifugal force will not throw out material in a straight line such disks have the grooves and the entire space between the disks filled with material which is but slowly ground and discharged through the adjustable space between the flat surfaces adjacent to the circumference of the disks, thus limiting out- My improvement provides a movement of material between the disks as also a discharge, that is posterior to radial when the directions of the ridges and grooves are arranged with regard to the direction of rotation of the revolving disk.

The disks are adapted to be attached to machines now in common use, and it is not deemed necessary to show or describe such machines in this specification and drawing.

I claim:

1. ()re grinding disks having a flat finishs5 ing surface adjacent to the circumference, and nonradial ridges and grooves extending from a central eye or space to the flat surface, the ridges and grooves acquiring height and width as they approach the flat surface, the tops of the ridges and the bottoms of the grooves having plane surfaces.

2. A stationary grinding disk having a flat finishing surface adjacent to the circumference, with nonradial ridges and grooves extending from a central eye or space to the flat surface, the ridges and grooves acquiring height and width as they approach the flat surface, the direction of the ridges 110 and grooves being arranged with regard to the direction of rotation of an opposite revolving disk, and an opening in thecenter of the disk for the admission of material to be ground, the tops of the ridges and the bottoms of the grooves having plane surfaces.

QIlIlCllIlg disk havlng a flat 8. A revolving 0 finishing surface adjacent to the circumference, with nonradial ridges and grooves extending from a central eye or space to the flat surface, the ridges and grooves acquiring height and Width as they approach the flat surface, the direction of the ridges and grooves belng arranged with regard to the direction of rotation, the tops of the ridges An ore grinding disk having a central space, a finishing space at the circumference of the disk said finishing space having a plane surface, non-radial alternate ridges and grooves between said finishing space and said central space, said ridges and grooves having plane surfaces and bases respectively, said ridges and grooves having their surfaces and bases respectively, in planes de clining from the plane of said finishing space to said central space and inclined relative to one another. and sloping Walls between the bases of said grooves and the surfaces of said ridges at one side of the latter.

. p JOHN T. HOGAN. lVitnesses CHESTER B. SMITH,

HAL IE E.-Esrns.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3638871 *May 14, 1970Feb 1, 1972Barger Delos RGrain grinder
US4449670 *Oct 29, 1981May 22, 1984The Goodyear Tire & Rubber CompanyComminuting apparatus with improved feed system
US4449674 *Oct 29, 1981May 22, 1984The Goodyear Tire & Rubber CompanyComminuting apparatus with improved impeller construction
US4469284 *Oct 29, 1981Sep 4, 1984The Goodyear Tire & Rubber CompanyComminuting apparatus with improved rotor and stator recess construction
US4535941 *Jul 3, 1984Aug 20, 1985The Goodyear Tire & Rubber CompanyMethod of comminuting elastomeric pellets
US4597536 *Oct 29, 1981Jul 1, 1986The Goodyear Tire & Rubber CompanyComminuting apparatus with improved rotor and stator composition
US4614310 *Oct 29, 1981Sep 30, 1986The Goodyear Tire & Rubber CompanyComminuting apparatus with fluid cylinder rotor and stator biasing
US8800900 *Sep 30, 2010Aug 12, 2014Parviz GharagozluMethod and device for comminuting ore
US20130048766 *Sep 30, 2010Feb 28, 2013Parviz GharagozluMethod and device for comminuting ore
EP2762233A1 *Sep 30, 2010Aug 6, 2014Parviz GharagozluMethod and device for crushing ore material
Classifications
U.S. Classification241/296
Cooperative ClassificationB02C7/12