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Publication numberUS1436637 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 28, 1922
Filing dateSep 27, 1920
Priority dateSep 27, 1920
Publication numberUS 1436637 A, US 1436637A, US-A-1436637, US1436637 A, US1436637A
InventorsBates Adelmer M
Original AssigneeBates Valve Bag Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wire-tying tool
US 1436637 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

2 SHEETS-SHEET I.

Patented Nov. 28, 1922,

A. M. BATES. WIRETYNG TOOL. APPLICATION HLED SEPT. 27, 1920.

A. M. BATES. WIRE TYING TOOL. PucAnore FILED Patented Nov. 28, 1.922@ l 2 EEEEEEEEEEEE 2.

Patented Nov. Z8, 1922.

ADELIJIER M. BATES, OIE' QCHICAGO, ILLINOIS, ASSIGNOR TO BATES VALVE BAG confirm, oy calcareo,

ILLINOIS, A CORPORATION F WEST VIRGINIA.

Winn-Trino Toon Application med September .27, 1920. Serial No. 413,047.

To all whom t may concern."

Be it known that L-ADnLMnR M. BATES, a citizen of the United States, residing at Chicago, in the county o Cook and State of Illinois, have invented a certain new and useful Improvement in Wire-Tying Tools, of which the Jfollowing is a specification.

My invention-relates to wire tying tools by which the operator may, by the exertion 1o of tension, twist a, wire tie around the neck vof a bag. One object of my invention is to provide a tool which is so arranged that as soon as the operator releases the tension, the ,hook 'which engages the loopv on the end oli the wire tie, automatically disengages there; from. This is done by having the hook inclined in a plane inclinedto the axis of rotation of the twisting element'so that,when the retracting spring draws the twisting element back into the handle, the rearwr ro tation will cause the hook to unscrew from the tie. l

Another object of my invention is to provide a wire tying tool-which will overcome the difiiculty ordinarily found in starting the twisting of the tie. I accomplish this by having the spiral on the twisting shank cut on a varying pitch so that at the beginning of the movement, a relatively slow pull by the operator causes a comparatively slight, angular movement of the twisting shank owing to the spiral -being cut on a gradual pitch.- rlhe nut at the head oil the handle passes down to that part of the `spiral where the twisting is more rapid and thus a greater rate of rotation is given, the idea being that before the two tie ends are crossed. it requires a considerable amount of power to start them and to start the twisting, and thus at the beginning of the movement, the slow pitch gives that power while at the end of the movement, the. eiifertive f radius through which the apparatus twists is greater, hence the rapid twisting movement at the end of the stroke My invention is illustrated more or less diagrammatically in the accompanying drawings, wherein;

Figure l is a side elevation ofthe wire tying tool before the tie has been made; i

Figure 2 is a similar elevation after the tie' .has been made; l

Figure 3 is a section on an enlarged scale, showing the initial position k u lvl.

Figure 4 is an end View showing the twistin `of the hook;

igure 5 is a section en aging lug;

igure 6 is a view of the tie; Figure 7 isa modified form ofthe spiral; Figure 8 is a cross section of Figure 7 before twisting;

showing the spiral Figure 9 is a cross section after twisting;v

Fi ure l() is a side elevation of the modified orm;

Figure l1 is a section thereofl before it has been twisted.

Like parts are indicated by like characters throughout.

A is a twisting handle corrugated at A and having at its rear end a hole A3 whereby a. thong A* maybe attached for holding. A5 is a nut screw threaded into the front end of the hollow handle. This nut has a sgpiral engaging member Aon its inner suri B is the spiral. It isla rod which may be made as a spiral or screw threaded or it may be formed by twisting a iiat rod which has at its outer end a hook B. of varying pitch, that is it is more gradual and sharper toward the rear, the idea being The spiral B isthat for a long movement JiErom X to Y we get one revolution, from Y to Z a shorter distance we get one revolution and from Z to l. we get one revolution. The result of this is that at the beginning of the turn be- Jfore the ends of the tie are crossed, a relatively great long movement is required to give the twisting tension the desired power, afterward toward the end the twisting speeds up thus saving time.

'B2 is a sleeve surrounding the rear end of the spiral shank and is engaged and .held in position by the nut B3, which nut also holds the spiral spring` B4 and\,is so constructed between the nut B3 at one end and the nut A5 at the other so that the shank is pulled out into the hook so that thev spring will be compressed betweenithe two nuts.

C is the bag which is to he tied. C the bag tie having the looped ends 'C2 adapted to be engaged lily theihook B adapted as shown to moveiinthe direction in which the hook is spiraled so that when the handle is pulled out' from thel position of Figure 1 it rotates in the` direction oi' the hook, pullingN the hook into the loops until the posivio ` rotates more rapidly as the tion of Figure 2 is reached. When the terr sion on the handle is released the spring tends to pull the shank or spiral back and will rotate it in the opposite direction and unscrew the lspirally disposed hook from the'tie loops.

The modified form shown in Figure 7 the shank is made up ofa square bar D and the square bar before being twisted is the cross section of Figure 8. It is twisted to provide the spiral as shown in Figure 7. When this is done the cross section becomes that of Figure 9 and it is only necessary to make the nut to iit that cross section. A disadvantage however of the spiral types of Figures 2 and 7 is that the spiral has curved walls. and there is a tendency to wedge the parts and thereby increase friction and to require an undue amount of powerfor twist-- ing them. To avoid this the modified form of Figure l0 is provided.

For Figure 10 is shown a spirally twisted slotted round rod, E. The .slot has straight sides as indicated atE E and when twisted the cross-section does'not sensibly change. the result-of this is that the drive is taken from the square sides E thus there is no tendency toward Wedging action.

The use and operation'of my invention are as follows:

The operator takes a bag tie in one hand. holding tlietool in the other. lle hooks one of theloops of the tie over the hook7 passes the bight ofthe tie around the bag or other object which is to be fastened and brings the other eyeletback into engagement with the hook. This leaves the two ends of the tie somewhat fwidely separated. He then pulls on thetool and owing to the gradual pitch the spiral, a relatively consid erable linear movement of ythe hand piece with respect to the hook, will cause a comparatively slight rotary movement of the hook thus giving a high mechanical advantage at the beginning ot the movement and overcoming tl initial resist-v ance to twisting. As the movement continues, the ends ofthe tie cross and from then on a comparatively lesser torque'is required to twist the tie, andthe pitcli of the tool is therefore arranged so that the twisting hook tool is pulled back.

Owing to the inclination of the hook in the same direction as the twist of the spiral while twisting is going on7 the hooi; tends .to screw into the tie` thus making avsecure hold, but as soon as the ope-rater releases the tension, the spring which tends to pull the hook back info the handle commences its work and causes the spiral to twist back tliusiminediatelv disengaging the hook from the tie and making it unnecessary for the operator to manipulate the tool -as has been necessary in the past to disengage the hook.

I claim: 1./In a wire tying tool a single axial tie Vengaging hook, means responsive to the exrotating it in the opposite direction to dis?,

engage it from the tie. l

3. In a Wire tying tool adapted for use with a wire tie'having av plurality of looped ends of a hook adapted to engage said loops, means for rotating it in one direction to twist the tie, and means vfor automatically rotating it in the opposite direction to disengage it frointlie tie, said means operative only when the initial tension has been relaxed.

a. In a. wire tying tool, a tie engaging hook located in a plane inclined to the axis of rotation, and means responsive to the exertion of a tension thereupon for rotating it in one direction to twist the tie, and means automatically operative when the tension is released for rotating it in the opposite direction to disengage it from the tie comprising a spring adapted to return the hook to its original positionin relation to the handle.

5. In a wire tying tool a single axial tie engaging hook, and a handle associated therewith, means responsive to the longitudinal movement of the handle for rotating the hook in onedii'ection to twist the tie, and means associated with the handle for thereafter rotating the hook in the opposite direction to disengage it from the tie, said means comprising a spring contained within the handle adapted to be compressed by the tie twisting movement.

t5. In a wire tying tool a hook located in a plane inclined to the axis of rotation, a. handle associated therewith, means responsive to the longitudinal movement of the handle for rotating the hook iii one direction to twist the tie, and means associated with the handle for thereafter rotating the hook in the opposite direction to disengage it from the tie.

7. In a wire tying tool,a tie engaging element and means for rotating 'it to twist the tie in response to relative axial n'iovement of the tool and the' tie engaging element, and unit means for automatically disengaging it from the tie at the end of the operative twisting excursion and for returning it to its original position in relation to the handle.

8. In a wire tying tool1 a tie engaging element and means for rotating it to twist the immensi'v tie in response to relative axial movement of the tool and the tle engaging element,

and unit means for automntlcally disengaging it from the tie at the end of the operative twisting' excursion and for returning it to its original position in relation to the handle, comprising a spiriti spring substan tially the saine ength when extended as the handle.

Signed at- Chicago, county of Cook and 10 State of Illinols, this 22nd day of September, 1920.

' ADELMER M. BATES.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2472510 *Mar 22, 1946Jun 7, 1949Western Electric CoWire twisting device
US2772702 *May 20, 1953Dec 4, 1956Donat GuignardBinding instrument
US3059670 *Feb 4, 1958Oct 23, 1962Charles E BurfordWire twisting tool
US3970117 *Jul 14, 1975Jul 20, 1976Zamansky Asher ZTwister for wire ties
US4665953 *Dec 16, 1985May 19, 1987Randall Paul DReversible safety wire pliers
US4776159 *Jul 1, 1986Oct 11, 1988Hellhead Enterprise Co., Ltd.Automatic spindle
US4947902 *May 22, 1989Aug 14, 1990Styner & Bienz AgDevice for twisting wires for connecting rods
US5211209 *Dec 2, 1991May 18, 1993Milbar CorporationReversible direction wire twisting pliers
US5560402 *May 17, 1994Oct 1, 1996Milbar CorporationReversible direction wire twisting pliers
US6962173 *Apr 7, 2003Nov 8, 2005Fishgrab Dewane KWire handling tool element and method of use thereof
Classifications
U.S. Classification140/119
International ClassificationB65B67/00, B65B67/06
Cooperative ClassificationB65B67/06
European ClassificationB65B67/06