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Publication numberUS1437929 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 5, 1922
Filing dateOct 22, 1920
Priority dateOct 22, 1920
Publication numberUS 1437929 A, US 1437929A, US-A-1437929, US1437929 A, US1437929A
InventorsBrockway Carl P
Original AssigneeInd Res Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Internal-combustion engine
US 1437929 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. P. BROCKWAY.

INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE.

APPLICATION FILED OCT 22,1920.

Operated by IhroH'la. valve, muhcmi Patented Dec. 5, 1922 I INVENTOR. CO/Z P Brock Way.

A TTORNEY Patented Dec. 5, 1922.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

CARL P. BROCKWAY, OF TOLEDO, OHIO, ASSIGNOR TO INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH CORPORATION, OF TOLEDO, OHIO, A CORPORATION OF DELAWARE.

INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINE.

Application filed October 22, 192o; Serial No. 418,803.-

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, CARL P. BRooKwAY, a citizen of the United States, residing at Toledo, in the county of Lucas and State of Ohio, have invented certain new anduseful Improvements in Internal-Combustion Engines, of which I declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description.

This invention relates to the adjustment. of the ports of a two cycle internal combustion engine of the sleeve valve type.

One object of the invention is to furnish simple means for conveniently adjusting the area of the exhaust openings of a two cycle internal combustion engine under various loads.

Another object is to provide means for adjusting the timing of the exhaustports of the engine without effecting the timing of the intake ports.

A further object is to provide a cylinder having sleeve valves and an adjustable compression chamber, the length of the cylinder being a minimum.

Another object is to vary the exhaust openings and compression chamber automatically with the amount of fuel charge.

Other object-s and advantages relating to details of construction and economies of manufacture will appear as I proceed with the description of that embodiment of the invention, which for the purpose of the present application I have illustrated in the accompanying drawings:

Referring to the drawings: I

Figure I is an elevation of the cylinder and head members embodying the principle of my invention.

Figure II is a vertical sectional view of the cylinder showing the adjustment of the cylinder head at full load with the throttle wide open.

Figure III is a sectional view slmilar to Figure II but shows an adjustment of the cylinder head for light load wlth the engine throttled down.

Figure IV is a cross sectional View of the cylinder taken along the line IV-IV in Figure II looking 1n the direction of the arrows.

Figure V is a cross sectional view of the cylinder taken along the line V-V in F 1gure III looking in the direction of the arrows.

In Figures I and II the cylinder wall is provided with exhaust ports 2, 2 and contains the piston 3, having a cylindrical sleeve 4:, extending therefrom to perform' outer end of the cylinder is mounted the re-entrant cylinder head 9, secured to the outer surface of the cylinder wall by the screw threads 10 of large pitch, which permit the head to be rotated with respect .to the cylinder wall thereby varying the position of the inner face of the cylinder head with respect to the exhaust ports 2, 2 and sleeve ports 5, 5 while the relation of the intake ports 6, 7 to the port 8 remains unchanged. At diametrically opposite points upon the inner face of the cylinder head are cut away portions forming the recesses, or ports, 11, 11 which may be made to register with the exhaust ports 2, 5 as in Figure V, or may be rotated to a point between the exhaust ports, as in Figure IV, where they will have no effect upon the opening of the ports 2, 5.

The threads 10 are of such a pitch that when the cylinder head 9 is rotated through an arc of less than 180 degrees the compression chamber is decreased in volume to such a degree that proper compression may still be obtained for small fuel charges. Any means may be used for rotating the cylinder head but I prefer to rotate it by means of a link mechanism between the throttle valve (not shown) and the operating rod 15 which is attached to the lug 16 which is integral with or rigidly mounted upon the cylinder head 9. When the throttle is wide open the head is screwed up to give a larger compression space and at the same time the area of the exhaust passageway is lessened to prevent part of the large fuel charge to escape therethrough. In Figures II and IV, the cylinder head 9 is shown sion chamber, and drive out the exhaust gases efiiciently through the limited openlugs created by way of the ports 5, as

these ports are uncovered by the downward motion of the sleeve 4, and register with cylinder ports 2, 2.

In Figures III and V the cylinder head 9 is shown adjusted to a position corresponding to small power output where the engine is subjected to a light load. The position of the recesses 11, 11, is such that they register with exhaust. ports 5, 5 as shown in Figure V. By reason of the position of these recesses, the sleeve 4, in traveling down, will uncover the ports 5, 5 at an earlier time than in the case of Figure II, and will 'thus afford a larger opening for a longer period of time than in the case of Figure II. With this adjustment of the cylinder head, and the more limited supply of inrushing gas occurring at light load, the products of combustion can be easily ejected through the exhaust openings, which are rendered large by the registering of the recesses 11,11 with the ports 5, 5 and 2, 2.

It is obvious that the cylinder head may be made to assume positions intermediate of those shown in Figures II and III, whorebya portion only of the recesses 11, 11 will register with the ports 5, 2 thus providing for intermediate load conditions. The cylinder head may be turned manually, or by mechanism associated with the engine, to

accommodate the engine to the various load conditions.

Inengines of the sleeve valve type, the

' cylinder is generallyof greater length than in other types of engines, and it is therefore desirable to reduce this length as much as possible. By threading the head 9 to the outer surface of the cylinder wall 1, the sleeve 4 may travel to the extreme end of the cylinder, thus utilizing the fulllength' of the cylinder wall to the best advantage, and permitting the use of any desired len h of the threaded portion upon the outside surface of the cylinder wall, without increasing the. length of the cylinder.

I am aware that the particular embodiment-of my invention above described, and illustrated inthe accompanying drawing is susceptible of considerable variation without departing from the spirit thereof, and therefore-I desire to claim my invention broadly, as well as specifically, as indicated by the appended claims.

I claim as myinvention:

1. In an internal combustion engine, a cylinder, a piston therein, said cylinder-having a head co-operating with said piston and and a hea the walls of said 0 linder for varying the time of exhaust independently of the time of intake. I

2. In an internal combustion engine, a cylinder, a piston therein, said cylinder having a rotary head co-operating with said piston and the walls of said cylinder for varying the time of exhaust.

3. In an internal combustion engine, a cylinder, a piston therein, said cylinder having a head co-operating with said piston and the walls of said cylinder, and adjustable rotatably within said cylinder for varying the time of exhaust independently of the time of intake.

4. In an internal combustion engine, a cylinder member, a piston including a sleeve member, and a cylinder head member fittin within said sleeve member, ports in each 0 said membersregistering with each other at .one portion of the stroke, and means to vary 'the time of registering of the ports in said sleeve and cylinder members.

5. In an internal combustion engine, a cylinder member, a piston including a sleeve member, and a cylinder head fitting within said sleeve member, ports in both ofwsaid members, the ports in said sleeve member being covered and uncovered by said head assaid piston reciprocates, and means supporting said head for varying the time of covering and uncovering-of said sleeve ports by said head.

6. In an internal combustion engine, a cylinder, a piston therein, said cylinder having an inwardly extending head co-operating with said piston and the walls of said cylinder for varyin the time of exhaust.

7. In. an internaI combustion engine, a cylinder having ports. in the walls, a piston having a sleeve extension thereon" containing ports to register with said cylinder ports, said cylinder having a head fitting within said piston sleeve and provided with means to vary the time of opening of said having a sleeve extension thereon containing ports to register with said cylinder ports,

"said cylinder having a head fitting within said piston sleeve and provided with means to vary the' time of opening of said piston sleeve ports including two recesses at d1ametrically opposite sidesof the .inner face of said head.

9. In an internal combustion engine, a cylinder, a iston including a sleeve valve revolubly .supported on said cylinder, and co-operating with said sleeve valve for varying the area of the exhaust openin ofthe cylinder. I

10. l n an internal combustion engine,-a

cylinder, a piston including a sleeve valve, and a head supported on said cylinder and co-operating with said sleeve valve, said head bein adjustable in an axial and an angular'direction for varying the compression space and the exhaust openings of the engine.

11. In an internal combustion engine, a cylinder, .a piston including a sleeve valve, and a head threaded upon said cylinder and co-operating with said sleeve valve for varying the size of the exhaust openings of the engine.

12. In an internal combustion engine, a cylinder, a piston including a sleeve valve, and a head threaded upon the outer surface of said c linder, and co-operating With said sleeve Va ve for varying the size of the exhaust openings of the engine.

13. In an internal combustion engine, a cylinder having exhaust opening, a throttle valve, and means for varying the compression space in said cylinder, and varying the exhaust openings simultaneously With the varyin of the throttle position.

14. n an internal combustion engine, a cylinder having exhaust opening, athrottle valve, and means for varying the compres- 15. In an internal combustion engine, a.

cylinder having a movable head, a throttle valve, common means for varying the compression space in said cylinder and the size of the exhaust opening of said cylinder.

16. In an internal combustion engine, a cylinder having a movable head, a throttle valve, common means for varying the .compression space in said cylinder and the size of the exhaust opening of said cylinder simultaneously with the varying of the throttle position.

17 In an internal combustion engine, a cylinder having exhaust opening,a throttle valve, and means for varying the exhaust opening simultaneously With the varying of the throttle position.

18. In an internal combustion engine, a cylinder having exhaust opening, a throttle valve, and means for varying the exhaust opening automatically by the varying of the throttle osition.

In testimony whereof, I aflix my signature.

C'ARL P. BROO KWAY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2554336 *Apr 25, 1947May 22, 1951Kratzer Herbert JVariable compression ratio internal-combustion engine
US2610616 *Oct 21, 1946Sep 16, 1952Kenneth O WoodruffDiesel-type engine for toy aircraft
US2686505 *Jul 19, 1949Aug 17, 1954Gen Motors CorpVariable compression ratio engine
US2786458 *Apr 9, 1956Mar 26, 1957Hurdman W BarkTwo cycle internal combustion engine
US2914048 *Apr 30, 1957Nov 24, 1959Franz PhilippInternal-combustion engine with adjustable combustion chamber
US3025840 *Apr 1, 1958Mar 20, 1962Romano Casini CarloCarburetion engine with variablevolume combustion chamber
US4033304 *Jun 10, 1975Jul 5, 1977David LuriaPiston-type internal combustion engine
US5000132 *Jul 9, 1990Mar 19, 1991Jiro TakashimaScavenging system for a two-stroke internal combustion engine
US5186137 *Feb 29, 1988Feb 16, 1993Salzmann Willy ERocking-piston machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/48.00A, 123/41.75, 123/65.0VA, 123/73.00E
International ClassificationF01L5/00, F01L5/06
Cooperative ClassificationF01L5/06
European ClassificationF01L5/06