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Publication numberUS1439478 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 19, 1922
Filing dateMay 11, 1922
Priority dateMay 11, 1922
Publication numberUS 1439478 A, US 1439478A, US-A-1439478, US1439478 A, US1439478A
InventorsMaynes Hyla Frederick
Original AssigneeEmma C Maynes
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Amusement ride
US 1439478 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. F. MAYNES, AMusEMx-:NT RIDE,

Fl LED MAY l I 1922. 3 SHEETS-SHEET 3 @ATTORNEYS Paten-reid Dec. A1e,A 192:2.l

4Uui'rsol STATES PATENT' ort-iclgv HYLA FREDERICK MAYNES, F GAINES, PENNSYLVANIA, ASSIGNRf/F EMMA C. vMAYNIES, 0F GAINESQILPENNSYLVNIA. y

cnn-Hanni To AMUSEMENT RIDE.

Application led May 11,

To all whom t may concern Be it known that 1', HYLA F. MAYNES, a citizen of the United" States, residing at Graines, in thecounty o,f.Tioga,State of Pennsylvania; 'have invented certain new l,and usef-il Improvements in Amusement Rides; and I do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and 'exactl description of the invention, such as will enable others.v

1o skilled in the 'art to'which it appertains to make and use the same. This inventionv relates"to amusement zip/- paratus of the type in which the amusement is that afforded by a ride ofgsome kind. Merry-go-rounds, roller coasters and scenic railways are examples. Two elements co bine' to make these devices attractive totthe public,speed and novelty. The old-fashioned roller coaster thrilled with its speed zoalone. The merry-go-round and scenic railway combine speed. or at leastmotion, with novel features of various kinds. One

of theobjects of the present invention is to add something new to an amusement ride.'

rIhis new thing is a canopy, carried by the -cars, which may, dui-.ing the ride, alternately be opened up to expose to View the passengers in the cars, and closed upon the cars and their passengers, so that they are completely j shut otf from view of spectators, and made to feel that they are traveling within a tunnel, thus affording a new and unexpected element or incident in the ride.E -This canopy may be continuous, 'enclosing the entire train, -or each individual carvmay'be' separately enclosed. The passengers are not warned as to when the canopy to be closed, nor when it is to be opened. i This adds excitemeht. Besides, when the canopy is down 40 and the` cars'aie traveling in `semi-darkness many things may happen. Siidden blasts ofi.

air may blow into the cars and ,strike the.

passengers in the'face. Strange lightsniay ldicker on the canopy walls; rilhus thecan Y opy not only imparts an aniusino variety to".y

.a ride otherwise without novel interest, but

it also affords opportunity for introducing and making more effective other elements of surprise and variety heretofore known to the art.

In an amusement apparatus of this'type, it is important vthat the seating capacityr pf the/ 192:2?. SeriZl oars, sho 1d be as large as possible. To.

avoid' decreasing the carrying capacity of such a ride, it is necessary that the enclosin canopy should be so constructed and locate that/in its' `folded position it "s of the/ passengers entering t e car. The arrangement of theinvention is therefore suchthat the/enclosing canopy when yfolded lies on /the side ing platfor here disclosed, thatv means that the folded canopy .lies between the cars and the center of the merrygo-round, and the canopy is arranged to unfold radially outward, so' that as it unfolds its outer edge moves in an arcA :j the cars away from the load- I/In the specific embodiment which rises over and terminates on the out'- side of the cars, so that when unfolded the canopy conceals the cars and the passengers from the view of the spectators. i

shown' one embodiment of my invention. Certain of the structural featuresshown are important and-are claimed, but thelinvention in its-broader as ects is more than these. n

n rthe accompanying drawings I have' I* these' drawings iig. 1 is a plan vi'ew of the w device showing a number ofthe ears and` ff' the canopy invits folded'oropen position;

Fig. 2 is an elevation of the device showing thel canopy closed and covering the cars; Iig. 3 is a vertical section on an enlarged scale through a car and the hub ofthe nierry-goround, the canopy being in its closed position; Fig. 4 is a detail showing-in vertical transverse section the canopy in folded position and `the supports and Guides by means of which .itis operated; Iig. 5 is a view si ilarkto Fig,l 4,"but showino' the cap- 'showing ne of the ars and the canopy\in` its folded osition; Fig. 7 is a vertical longiL tu\dinal`secti0n through one of the cars and the canopy in its closed position over the car opy in clgd position Figli is a dieta-il plan.

"and showing the springs by means of which the" canopy is automatically returned to its fold/d position.

i e amusement apparatus shown iii these drafwings is of the iiierry-go-iound type and comprises a central hub 1 which rotates about a vertical hollow shaft 2 and is supported upon suitable bearings' 3. Extendin y.outwardly from thishub are a' series o radiall argns4 pivoted at 5` to the huband trackway '7.

'ry-go-round from a motor 11 which drives ya cable 1,2 encirclino a large sheave 13 bolted to and integral with the hub 1.. This sheave is supported and steadied by guys 14. fastened to its spokes 15, the upper ones extending from a standard 16 mounted upon the hub. In order to permit the radial arms to rise and fall with the undulations of the trackway it is, of course, necessary that they be pivoted to the hub, but it is obvious that were the rotating power applied at this point a very severe strain upon these pivots would result. It is, therefore, deslrable to apply the power at a-point somewhat nearer the cars themselves. I therefore provide each arr'n 4 with flexible connections 17 which extend from a point adjacent each car to one of the spokes 15 of the sheaye 13 justahead, and ay similar flexible connection 18 to one of the following spokes. By this means the arms and the cars can follow the undulations of the trackway and yet at the same timethe force moving them be positively applied at a point which practically coincides with the weight carried by them and relieves the pivots 5 from strain.

In accordance with this invention I have provided a canopy 20, usually of canvas, which covers the entire train of cars and folds radially of the merry go-round. The canopy is normally in open or folded position and .rests upon the radial arms on the inside of the seats, as is best shown in Figs. 1, 4 and 6." The canopy is supported when in its closed position by a series of supports 21|, which open and close fanlike. These supports are U-shaped, the canopy being secured to them at their closed ends, their open ends being journaled' about rods 22, one of which extends from the back of each car 9 and is supported at its other end upon a V-shaped standard 23 carried by the links S. Each set of supports 21 is extended to close the canopy by-means of a cable 24 actuated by means sltuated at the center of the merry- `.go-round', as will be described later. The effective component of the pull exerted by this cable is, of course, the one normal to the ist support 21. and in order to maintain the angle which this cable makes with this support .as nearly 90 as is feasible throughout the entire closing rnovement, I have provided \two guide arms 25 likewise journaled upon rod 22 and provided at their outer ends with eyes A26 through which 'the cable 24 passes. When the canopy is in its insa/178 open position, as shown in Fig. 4, cable 24 passes from the uppermost support 21, through the eyes 26 of the guide arms 25, around a pull'ey 27 mounted within a hanger 28 on one of the outer links and inwardly to the source of power. When pull is exerted upon the cable to close the canopy the arms 25 and the supports 21 swing counter-clockwise (as shown in Fig. 4) about the rod 22 until they assume the position shown inl Fig. 5.

The cables 24 from each set of supports 21 extend inwardly, under pulleys 29, and unite at 30 into a common cable. This cable passes about a drum 32 mounted'upon the standard 1G and driven by a motor 33. The current for this motor is led to it through a pair of slip rings 34, mounted uponx the hollow shaft 2, and brushes 35.

The canopy is returned to its folded position by means of a series of tension springs 36 which extend between the supports 21 of adjacent sets, as shown most clearly in Fig. 7. Now it will be clear from an inspection of Fig. 6 that when the canopy is closed these springs are placed under tension, as

the distance between the closed ends of the U supports 21 is greater when the canopy is closed than when it is open, this following from the circular shape of the merry-goround. Therefore, the moment the tension on cables 24 is relaxed, these .,prings 36 will automatically return the canopy to its open ness which ensues it is possible to move lights \over the outer surface of the canopy. which will give the effect of relative movement and make it appear to the occupants of the ca rs that they are in fact traveling within a tunnel. of the aspects of the invention. As a matter of fact, each car may be separately cut off from eachother caizby means vof a canvas partition 39 secured to each set of supports 21 and shown in Fig. 5. The cars are also shown provided with slotted bottoms 40 and dashboards 41, so that, if desired, blasts of air may be suddenly introduced to add to the fun of the ride.

1. In an amusement ride havinga traveling passenger car or train, the combination with the car or train of a canopy traveling therewith and1 adapted to be interposed between the car ory train and spectators, and means for moving the canopy during the ride into and out of concealing position to However, this 1s but one ijfiaaeve .and expose them to the view of spectators.

3. In an amusement ride having a traveling passenger car or train and a loading platform, the combination with lthe car or train of a folding canopy traveling therewith and adapted to fold and lunfold transversely of the path of movement of .the car or train and lying when folded on the side of the car or train away from the loading platform, and means for folding and Aunfoldin *the cano y during the ride to alternate y conceal t e passengers from and expose them to the view of spectators.

4. In an amusement ride having a traveling passenger train, the combination with the train of a canopy travelingl therewith land ada ted to be interposed between/the train an spectators, and means for moving, the canopyduring theride into and out of concealing position to alternately expose and conceal the passengers from the v1ew of 'the spectators, said canopy having par-' titions arranged. to separate atleast one car of the train'from those. adjoining it.

v 5. In an amusement ride having a'traveL: ing passenger train, the combination withthel train. of a folding vcanopy traveling therewith' and being when folded at one side of the path of movement o`f the Mtrain, andmeans for folding and unfolding the canopy transversely during the ride to alternately conceal the passengers from and expose them to view of spectators, said canopy having partitions arranged to separate at least one car of the train from those adjoin- I lnormally lying in folded conditionilength-l 6; In an amusement ride having a traveling passenger train and a loading platform, the combination with the train of't folding canopy traveling therewith and lying'when folded on the side of the train avvay .from the loading'platform,\and means fotl folding and-aunteldingatheacanonygljtransversely of the path of movement of the train cluring engers.

the ride to alternately conceal the pas from and'expose them to the view of spectators, said canopy having partitions arranged to separate at least one car of the train from those adjoining it.

7. In an amusement ride, having a traveling passenger car or train, the combination with the car or train of a folding canopy Wise of the car or train and t" one side thereof, :fan-like supports for t e canopy pivoted on -the car or train, and means for opening out these supports fan-wise to spread/the canopy over the car or train.

' 8. ^In an amusement ride having a travel- .ing passenger car lor train, thecombination withlthe car or train of a, folding canopy normally lying: in folded condition length- Wise of thecar or train and to one side thereof, fan-like supports for the canopy pivoted` v on the car or train. a cable fastened '4to' each set of fan-like supports through whichv force is exerted to open 'them and spread the canopy, and pivoted guide arms for the cable duringthe opening movement, holding it rso that the force exerted by it 'shall'be substantially normal to the movin support.

9. An amusement apparatus of t e merrygo-round type, 'comprising the. combination of cars revolvin about a central pivot, and a radiallv y fo ding canopy normally lying in folde condition between the cars and the pivot and adapted to be interposed between the car' or train and spectators, and

means for moving the canopy durngthe ride into and out of concealing position. to alternately expose and'c'onceal the passengers from the view of the spectators.

merry-go-round type, comprisingthe combination of cars revolving about a vcentral ivot, a radially folding canopy normally 10. An amusement apparatus of the I ying in folded condition between the cars and the pivot and adapted to4 be interposed between the car or train and spectators, and means for unfolding the canopy outwardly during the ,ride to cover the cars, to condml the passengers from the view of the tators.

11. An amusement apparatus of their merry-go-round type, comprising the comx "105 binati-on of cars revolving about a entral pivot, a radially folding canopy normally lying in folded .condition betwee the -cars and the pivot, fan-like suppo ts for the -canopy pivoted adjacent tha/cars, tension 'sprmgs connecting adjacent fan-like suplioV ports, means for opemng out the fan-like 'i supports to spread the canopy and enclose thel cars, the springs serving to return the 'canopy to 'its folded position as soon asthe opening means .cease to act.

l12. An amusement apparatus oft the merry-go-round` type,comprising the combination of cars revolving' abouta central y l pivot, a radially folding canopy normally lyna in folded condition between the cars canopy pivoted on the cars, a cable fastened to eachy set of fan-like supports through whichl force `is exerted 'to open them'and spread the canopy, and a spring `serving to soon as the'ffo relaxed.'

Y 11.3- Aeiassises?.arpents;efe

ne pivot, fan-like supports for theJ .return thatcanpy to its folded sition .as ered.,byeiables-is merry-go-round type, comprising the combination of cars revolving about acentral pivot. a folding canopy normally lying in folded condition between the cars and -the E* pivot, fan-like supports for the canopy pvted adjacent to the carsA a cable fastened o each se of fan-like supports through which force is exerted during the ride to open themand spread Jche canopy to conceal the passengers from the spectators, and een- 10 trally located means for actuating the cables.

In testimony whereof I aflix my signature.

HYLA FREDERICK MAYNES.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2638345 *Aug 16, 1947May 12, 1953Benjamin E NorvellOccupant propelled roundabout
US4775144 *Sep 17, 1987Oct 4, 1988Paul ShipmanAn equilibrium affecting assembly
US7717798 *Nov 3, 2006May 18, 2010Graco Children's Products Inc.Child motion device
US7722118Mar 1, 2007May 25, 2010Mattel, Inc.Repositionable child support device
Classifications
U.S. Classification472/37, 472/36
International ClassificationA63G1/34, A63G1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63G1/02, A63G1/34
European ClassificationA63G1/34, A63G1/02