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Publication numberUS1443367 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 30, 1923
Filing dateFeb 18, 1919
Priority dateFeb 18, 1919
Publication numberUS 1443367 A, US 1443367A, US-A-1443367, US1443367 A, US1443367A
InventorsKennedy Joseph E
Original AssigneeKennedy Joseph E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for dehydrating fruit, vegetables, and other materials
US 1443367 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. E. KENNEDY.

KPPARATU; FOR DEHIYDRATING FRUIT, VEGETABLES. AND.0THER MATERIALS.

-FILED Fee,

4 SHEETS'SHEET 1 ffluenlor" JEKe nee? ,3 721194270 Jan. 30, 1923. 1,443,367

J. E. KENNEDY, APPARATUS FOR DEHYDRATING FRUIT. VEGETABLES. AND OTHER MATERIALS.

FuEn FEB. 18. 1919. I 4 SHEETS'SHEET 2 raven for? Jan. 30, 1923. 1,443,367

J. E. KENNEDY. I

APP-ARATUS FOR DEHYDRATING FRUIT, VEGETABLES,

FILED FEB.18 I919v AND OTHER MATERIALS.

4 SH EJs-SHEET 3 Invenzor Jblffezmegy Jan; 30, 1923. 1,443,367 E J. E, KENNEDY APPARATUS FOR DEHYDRATING FRUIT. VEGETABLES. AND OTHER MATERIALS FILED FEB 18. 919. 4 SHEETS'SHEET 4 a xr--5 23 1 7 :114

[huen/or I JZ/(ennea Patented 1.... so, 1923.

UNITED STATES 1,443,367 PATENT OFFICE.

JOSEPH E.- KENNEDY, or -Il\TEW roux, 1v. Y.

.APPARATUS FOR D EHYDRATING FRUIT, VEGETABLES, AND OTHERIHATERIALS.

Application filed February 18, 1919. Serial 170. 277,731.

'Apparatus for Dehydrating Fruit, Vegetables. and Other Materials, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to dehydrating of material, such as fruit, vegetables and other material, and it is theprimary object of'the invention to provide apparatus for treating material, such as fruit, vegetables andthe like, in such a manner that there will be no breaking of the cellular structure and they may be restored to their original condition by the addition of water, and to provide apparatus for carrying out the same is simple cheap and compact in structure and efii c'zent in operation.

In carrying outthe invention the fruit or vegetables are first pared and cleaned and preferably cut into parts, after which they are partially cooked by subjection to direct contact with steam, and then dried by subjectingthe same to dried and preheated air. In some materials in which the cellular structure is very delicate in order to prevent any breaking down of the cellularstructure the materials after being steamed and previous to being subjected to the heated air are subjected 'to a chilling bath, as by submerging the same quickly in water, as they are delivered from the steaming means and previous to subjecting the material to treatment by the heated air.

It. is another object of the invention to provide apparatus in which the carrying out of the above process is continuous that is, ihe travel. or feeding of the material from the entrance of the material in its untreated state is progressive through the apparatus as apples and peaches, and vegetables, such as otatoes. reat difficulty has been experi-.

p h elevation of the, upper portion of the dry:

enced in retaining the same in their original condition as to color. due to the action of the acids of the fruit and vegetables while in contact with the air with the reshlt that they become discolored making the same unpleasant to the sight and unappetizing. It has been found, however. that such dis'coloring of the fruit and vegetables does not take place after the same have been cooked or partially cooked by subjecting the same to direct contact with steam, said cooking tending to neutralize the acid, in the form of a starchy acid, at the outer surfaces of the parts of the fruit or vegetables. It is a further object of the invention to is continuous from the delivery of the material to the apparatus to the discharge therefrom, and in which the fruitor vegetables, after being pared and cleaned, are placed in a receptacle and submerged in water therein, are delivered from such receptacle to a steaming means without contact with the air and therefore without any possibility of diScolm-ing.

In the dehydrating of material it is essential that during the drying process there be no appreciable diminution in the temperature of the air with a consequent reduction In the capacity of the air to take up moisture. and it is a. further object of the invention to provideimproved means to heat and provide a constant supply or current of heated air in a chamber through which the material being dried is transported.

It is a further object of the invention to provide an improved heatingmeaus or furnace to heat the air and in which the steam to cook the fruit or vegetables is generated simultaneously with the heating of the air for the drying of the same.

It is a further objec-t'of the invention to provide an improved drying chamber and conveyor means to transport. the material to and fro in the chamber, and the chamber arranged whereby access may be had for inspection of the material being dried during any stage of the drying process.

provide an apparatus in which the process -In thedrawings' accompanying-and forming apart of this specification, Figure 1 is a plan view illustrating an embodiment of apparatus for carrying out my improved process ofdehydrating materiaL' Figure 2 ,is a front elevation looking at the bottom of Figure-1.

Figure 3 is anenlarged sectional front ing chamber and the means to -move 'or transport the material to and fro therein.

Figure .4 is an enlarged sectional side elevation of the steaming means, a portion of the means to deliver the material to the steaming means. the chilling means. and means to deliver the material from the veyor buckets for transporting the material from the steaming means to the chilling means and from the latter to means to drain the surplus water therefrom, and from the draining means to Conveyor means in the drying chamber.

Figure 5 is an enlarged side elevation of aportion of the conveying or transporting means in the drier.

Figure 6 is an enlarged detail in perspective looking at the top of a material supporting means ofthe conveyor.

Figure 6 is a sectional end elevation ofv the conveyor means and showing the relation of guides thereto to prevent the spilling of the material from the lateral ends of the material supporting means or trays.

Figure 7 is a front elevation, partly in section, of a furnace for generating steam used to steam cook the material and to heat theair for the drying chamber.

Figure 8 is a sectional side elevation of the furnace shown in Figure 7.

Figure 9 is an enlarged sectional side elevation of conveyor means to transport the material from a receptacle for the material and convey and deliver the same to the steaming means.

Figure 10 is an end elevation of a revoluble carrier for the material during the steam cooking thereof.

Figure 11 is a view of the carrier looking at the side of Figure 10 and showing the means to progressively advance or feed the material through and deliver it from the carrier. a

Figure 12 is a perspective view of means for spreading the material in a thin layer upon the conveyor in the drying chamber as the material is delivered thereto.

Figure 13 is a detail of one of the conerably of cubiform, the receptacle containing liquid, as water, in which the fruit or vegetables are immersed to be out of contact with the air. The material is constantly delivered from the. receptacle 20 to a steaming chamber 21 having a steam inlet 21 and an outlet 21 for the waters of condensation of the steam which may lead-back to the source of steam supply. The material is progressively fed through the chamber 21 and'delivered to a Water carrying drum 22, and from the water drum delivered to a hot air chamber C for drying. The material is delivered from the receptacle 20 by suitable conveyor means, and shown as comprising buckets 23 pivotally carried by a chain or chains 24- passing around and having movement imparted thereto by a wheel 25, the buckets being adapted to dump the material therefrom as they pass over the wheel 25 into a chute 27 in the steam chamber 21 leading into a foraminous drum 29 mounted upon and rotatable with a shaft 30 in the steam chamber. The buckets 23 are arranged with perforations 23 ,to' ermit a portion of the water to drain theref i'om as they are elevated but to retain a portion of the water therein to operate to wash the material from the buckets as they are dumped. The foraminous drum 29 (Figures 4, 10 and 11) comprises a pair of rims 31 carried by arms radiating-from hubs mounted on the shaft 30 andar'ound which rims perforated material, shown. asfwi recloth or mesh, is stretched with the end portions bent to form the ends of the drum, as at 32 and 33, with openings coaxially with the drum, and through the opening 33" of which the chute 27 projects. The conveyor is enclosed by a housing 3 1 (Figures 2 and 9), the upper end of which is connected to the steam chamber, and the lower portion of which is constructed to constitute an outlet chute for the receptacle 20, as shown at 35, a circular drum 26 being arranged in said chute portion to serve as a guide for the conveyor chain or chains and buckets. The space between the drum 26 and the bottom of the chute 35 is so arranged as to leave sulficient room for the ready passage of the buckets, and the buckets in their passage therethrough pick up any material which has gravitated to said spacefrom the receptacle 20. A valved outlet 35' may be provided in the lower portion of the housing to drain the water from the housing and the receptacle 20.,

The conveyor for conveying the material from the receptacle 20 to the steaming chamber is driven from the shaft 30 by a chain 36 passing around a sprocket wheel 37 fixed to the shaft 30 and a sprocket wheel 38 fixed to a shaft 39 journaled in a bearing in a bracket 40 and bearing 41 mounted in the endof the steam chamber. The shaft 30 18 also journaled at one end in the end wall of the steam chamber. as at {12, both of the bear ings 41 and 42 being-cap hearings to enclose the ends of the shafts 30 and 39 to prevent the escape of steam from the steam chamber through said bearings. The opposite end of the shaft 30 is journaled in a bearing 13 end 32 and delivered from said pockets to a.

' tight connection.

hopper portion extending into the drum of a chute 46 projecting through the end Wall of the steam chamber. The material while in the drum and in its passage there through is in contact with steam in the steam chamber and the revolving of the drum and the conveying of the material thereto by the conveyor from the receptacle 20 and through the drum is such as to subject the material to the steam a sufficient length of time to partially cook the same.

The material is delivered from the drum 29 to the water carryingchamber ,or drum 22, which is also mdunted upon the shaft 30 to rotate therewith, and the drum 29, saidwater' drum being juxtaposed to the discharge end of the drum 29 and the steam chamber and having a charging opening into which the chute 46 extends. The outlet of the chute is in a portion which extends to the lower portion of the drum 22 to be sealed by the water in the drum. By this arrange- -ment of the outlet chute 46 in the water in the drum 22 and the water in the lower part-- of the conveyor housing from the receptacle 20, the steam chamber is entirely sealed. The material is progressively and continuousl fed through the drum 22 during the revo ving thereof from the chute 46 and its discharge from an opening in the op site end of the drum by blades 47 fixed- 111 the drum and which may be similar to the blades 44 in the foraminous drum 29 in the steam chamber. The drum 22 may have a valved outlet 52 to drain the water therefrom. The shaft 30 with the drums 29 and 22 is driven from a suitable source, and is shown as being driven by achain 48 passing around an annular sprocket wheel 49 encir cling thedrum 22 and around a sprocket wheel 50 (Figure 1) on a shaft 51.

After the material has'been chilled by submersion in-the water in the drum 22 it is delivered to the chamber C to be dried. However, before delivering the material to the drying and to drain the surplus water from the material it is delivered to a foraminous cylinder or drum 53, consisting of wire cloth or mesh extending around the discharge opening of the drum 22'and extending coaxially from the end of the drum ils clearly shown in'Figures 1, 2 and 4. A'

pan 54 having an outlet 55 extends below the cylinder 53 to catch the water I as it secured. thereto.

drains from said cylinder. From the cyl-- inder 53 the material is delivered to the drying chamber C through a chute 55 in an upwardly extended portion of the said chamber and delivered through the chute by a fan wheel 56 rotatable in a circular portion of the chute and driven by a chain 57 from a sprocket wheel 58 on a shaft 59. This fan wheel 56 comprises blades or panels extending radiallyand in opposite directions from a shaft and arranged so that the lateral edges engage the walls of 4 the circular portion of the chute and operate 'to atall times maintain the opening through the chute closed to prevent the exit of the hot air in the chamber C therethrough and transport material through the chute as the wheel is revolved. The shaft-59 is driven from the shaft 51 by ,a'worm 51 on 60 on the shaft 59. A

The drying chamber C is of rectangula shape as shown in plan in Figure 1, and comprises framework with sheet metal The chamber has an inlet 61 in one side at the bottom for the entranceof dried and heated air, and an outlet 62 at the top for the air after it has been passed through the chamber and absorbed -the moisture of the material being dried.

The walls of the chamber are provided with hinged closures 63 for openings to swing on horizontal axes, and openings in one side wall of the chamber are closed by removable covers 64 having hand grips to remove and replace them in the openings. The hinged I closures for the openings in the end walls and the openings closed by the covers 64 are arranged in line with a conveyor or conveyors in the chamber to be hereinafter described to ins ect the condition of the material being dried during the different stages of the drying process. 1

. The hot and dried air supply to the drying chamber is from a furnace, designated in a general way by F in Figures 1 and 2. This furnace is a combined steam generator for the steam for the steam chamber and air heating furnace. plates 65, 66, 67, 68 and'69 bolted together wall,.the top and the bottom, respectively. of a rectangular combustion chamber, and shown as provided with a grate 70. The side and end walls as well as the top are provided with laterally projecting ribs or fins, as shown at 71. for a purpose to be hereinafterdescribed. The front wall 72 has the usual doors for the openings to the fire box and ash pit. The top plate has an opening 7 3 leading from the combustion chamber andadapted to be connected to -a flue for the escape of. the gases and products of combustion. For the purpose of generating steam a series or coils of pipes 74 ex- The furnace comprises.

to constitute the opposite side walls. the end jacket 76 of sheet metal to constitute an air chamber aroundthe combustion chamber, the walls of the jacket being spaced from the lateral edges of the ribs 71 to 'radiate the heat from said'ribs and heat the air within the jacket instead of permitting thesame to be transmitted to the walls. of the jacket as would be the case should the ribs be in contact with such walls and radiating the heat through such walls to the air outside of the jacket.

To supply air to and create an air circulation throughth jacket 76 and thereby through the drying chalnber C a blower (shown ina general way at B) is employed,

connected to a pipe 77 leading to the top and forward end of the jacket 7 6, as shown at 78, whereby the cool air is injected into the jacket at a point of the jacket where the heat is the greatest, and is then forced down around the sides and back of'the combustion chamber to thoroughly heat the air, and is forcedfrom the jacket through an outlet 79 at the bottom and rear of the jacketiconnected by a pipe or conduit having a flaring outlet to the inlet 61 of the chamber C. A suitable damper may be located in the connection between the outlet of the air jacket of the furnace and the inlet to the chamber C to shut off and con- I trol the flow of air from the jacket to said chamber, and this damper may be arranged with means controlled by the temperature of the air in the jacket to control and regulate the damper.

The blower B is preferably of the: rotary type driven from a suitable source of power.

29 and the other movable parts of the ap-' paratus through a pinion 81 meshing with a gear 82 on a shaft 83 which is in the nature of a speed reducing gearing. The shaft 51 is driven from the shaft 83 by a sprocket chain 84 passing around a sprocket wheel 85 on the shaft 83 and a sprocket wheel 86 on the shaft 51.

To dry the material it is transported to and fro longitudinally through the drying chamber C- by conveyor means comprising a series of superposed endless conveyors, the material being delivered from the chute 55 to the upper stretch of the uppermost conveyor, and the respective conveyors beupon brackets 89 at one end of the chamber C, and around sprocket wheels 90 fixed .to ashaft 91 journaled in bearings supported upon brackets 92 at the opposite end of thechamber. A series of trays 93 (Figures 3, 5 and (S) are successively connected adjacent their forward ends to these chains 87. The trays comprise a rectangular piece of perforated material, such as wire cloth or mesh. A bar 94 is connected to each tray adjacent the forward end, preferably at the bottom, by cleats 95 to extend transversely of the trays with the opposite ends of the bars projecting from the sides of the trays. The ends of the bars engage in openings in ears 96 connected to links of the chains and held-against endwise movement by cotter pins passing through the bars. Bars 97 of substantially the same or slightly less length than the width of the trays are secured to the rear portions of the trays. ranged in successive juxtaposed relation with a portion ofthe forward end of the succeeding trays overlapping the rear portion of-the preceding trays as clearly shown in Figures 3, 4t and 5. of the trays as they are moved by the upper stretch of the conveyor chains are supported upon parallel bars or rods 98, supported on cross'bars 98, the rods 98 extending slightly within and above the chains with one end 99 curved to guide the trays as they move around the-pulleys 87 and of less length than the upper stretch-of the conveyor chains, as atl00, whereby as the trays approach the sprocket wheels 90 they will ride from the ends of. the supporting rods and tip as shown at 101 to dump the material from the upper trays to the trays of a lowerstretch ofthe conveyor chains. The cross bars 98 have cut outs for the passage of the chains. In the position of the trays shown at 101 the trays will engage with a cylindrical portion extending between the sprocket wheels 90 which will cause the trays to move to the. position shown at 102 and swing around the pivotal connection 9,4:of the tray with the chains as said connection of a tray and chain move to a position below the axis of the shaft 91 to the position shown at 103 with the portion of,-

the trayswhich are uppermost when moved by the upper. stretch of the chains engaging with parallel rods 10st supported on cross These trays are ar- The rear portionsfixed to a I bars 104 extending in a plane slightly below and within the lowerstretch ofthe chains. These rods 104 extend from adjacent 'one end of the chamber 0 to substantially adjacent the wheels 87- and terminate at a point substantially as shown at 105', and as the rearends of the trays appreach the ends of the-rods they will ride ofi from said rods and drop dumping the material onto the trays of the upper stretch of the succeeding lower conveyor, as shown at 106, when the trays are carried around the" wheels 87 as shown at 107 and 108 to position to again receive material from the chute 55.

To thoroughly and efficiently dry thematerial it is essential that the hot and dry air contact with substantially the whole surface of the material, and for. this purpose means are provided to spread the material. upon the trays in a thin layer as the material is delivered to the traysfrom the chute 55, and from the u per to the. lower trays of the conveyors an from one conveyor to another. As the material is delivered by-the chute 55 it is directed'to a spreader o'r plow 110 (Figure 12). Thisspreader comprises a bar or plate bent to angular shape as shown with circular portions or eyes at thedistance equivalent to the thickness of the layer desired, and which depends upon the thickness of the material being dried. To prevent s illing of the material from the lateralen s of the trays guides 114'are provided at opposite ends 'of the trays. These may be of suitable form' and construction and are shown as being of channel shape in cross section with. one leg or wall of the channel engaging over the trays and secured to and supported by the side walls of the chamber by rivets or bolts passing through the opposite wall'of the channel, as seen in Figures 3 and 6.

Similar guides are provided for the trays while being moved by the lower stretch of the chains. To prevent piling of the material on the trays of a lower stretch of the conveyor, or. as the material is dumped from the trays of one conveyor to another spreaders are provided. These spreaders are in the nature of bars extendlng transversely of the trays, as at 116, and adjustabletoward and away from the trays. I

In the construction shown there are four conveyors one superposed. to the other, and the conv rs are driven from the shaft 59,

said sha-f extending into the chamber C and vided with apiece of angle iron 123 at the er conveyor are mounte The next succeeding upper conveyor is driven from the shaft 59 by a sprocket chain 117 passing around a sprocket wheel on the shaft 59 and the shaft of the conveyor Wheels 87' of said conveyor. The next succeeding upper-conveyor is driven by a clfain 118 passing around sprocket wheels of the shafts of the conveyor wheels.87' of the respective conveyors, and the uppermost conveyor is driven in a like manner by a chain 119. As the material is delivered from the trays from the lower stretch of the lowermost conveyor it is delivered to a chute 120 leading to the exterior of the drying chamber and discharged from the chute to a suitable receptacle or bin. A fan wheel 121 similar to the wheel 56 in the chute 55 is also mounted in the chute 120,- said wheel operating to deliver the material through the chute and shut off escape of heated and dried air through the chute during the delivery of the material. To strengthen and add rigidity to the trays they may be proopposite sides to extend from the front tothe rear of the trays as shown in Figure 6.

In Figure 14 I have shown a modification of the means for mounting the draining drum As shown in Figure 4 this drum is connected to the drum 22 and rotatable with said drunr and the drum 29. These drums are rotated at a relatively slow Speed with the result that-such drainage as does take place as the material is delivered to the draining drum 53must be by gravity. To permit ofthe rapid rotation of the drainingdrum and the throwing of the surplus water from the material carried thereby through centrifugal action, the draining drum is rotatably mounted upon the shaft 30 independent of the drum 22 and is provided with means to rotate the same independently of the shaft 30. As shown the drum is mounted on a sleeve 204 rotatable on the shaft 30, and motion is imparted to. the drum from the shaft 30 through a gear 200 fixed on said shaft meshing with a pinion 201 rotatably mounted on a stud shaft, and a gear rotatable with the gear 201 meshin with a pinion 203 fixed to the sleeve 204.

aving thus described my invention, I

' claim:

1. In apparatus for dehydrating vegetables and the like, the combination with means to steam and chill the vegetables, of

veyor and from the trays of the lower stretch of an upper conveyor to the trays of the upper stretch of the next succeeding lower conveyor; and means to deliver the Vegetables from the steaming and chilling means to the conveyor and spread the same in a uniform layer upon the conveyor.

2. In apparatus for dehydrating vegetables, a drying chamber; and means to transport the material to and fro in said chamber; comprising a series of superposed conveyors, said conveyors consisting of chains stretched around revoluble sprocket wheels to travel in a horizontal path, trays pivotally connected to and supported at their forward ends by the chains, and means to support the rear portion of the trays independent of chains in their travel along the upper and lower stretch of the chains between the sprocket wheels, and successive trays arranged with the ends in overlapped relation to form a continuous supporting surface, and said trays being arranged to permit ofthe delivery of the material from the trays of the upper stretch of the chains, to the trays of the lower stretch of the chains, and means for spreading the material in a uniform layer upon the trays and prevent spilling of the material from the lateral ends of the trays, for the purpose specified.

3. In apparatus for dehydrating material, a drying chamber having an inlet; means connected to the inlet to cause a circulation of heated air throughsaid chamher; and superposed conveyors to trans ort the material to and fro in said cham er, comprising chains; spaced sprocket wheels around which the chains pass, a series of foraminous trays pivotally connected to and supported at their forward ends by the chains; and means extending between the sprocket wheels upon which the trays are supported in their travel bet-ween the sprocket wheels and the trays arranged so that the ends of successive trays will be in overlapped relation to form a continuous support during said travel of the trays; said support being arranged to permit the rear portion of the successive trays to drop and dump the material from the trays of the upper stretch of the conveyor to the trays of the lower stretch of the conveyor, and from the lower stretch of a conveyor to the trays of the next succeeding lower conveyor, and means for spreading the material in a uniform layer upon the trays, for the purpose specified.

4. In apparatus for dehydrating material, a drying chamber; and superposed conveyors to transport the material to and fro in said chamber, comprising chains, spaced sprocket wheels around which the chains pass, a series of foraminous trays pivotally connected to and supported at their forward their travel between the sprocket wheels and said tray being arranged so that the end portions of successive trays which overlap.

during this travel of the trays, said rods be ing of a length and arranged to permit the rear portion of the trays to run off from the rodsand dump the material from the trays of the upper stretch of the conveyor chains to the trays of the lower stretch of the conveyor chains, and from said latter trays to the trays of a succeeding lower conveyor; means to deliver material to and spread the same upon the trays of-the upper stretch of the conveyor; and means to spread the material on the trays of the lower stretch of the conveyor.

5. In apparatus for dehydrating material,

a drying chamber; and superposed con veyors to transport the material to and fro in said chamber, comprising chains, spaced sprocket wheels around which the chains pass, a series of foraminous trays pivotally connected to and supported at their forward ends by the chains; rods extending between the sprocket wheels to support the trays in their travel between the, sprocket wheels, said trays being arranged so that the end portions of successive trays will overlap during the travel thereof to provide a continuous supporting surface, and said rods being of a length and arranged to permit the rear portion of the trays to run off from the rods and dump the material from the trays of the upper stretch of the conveyor chains to the trays of the lower stretch of the conveyor chains, and from said latter trays to the trays of a succeeding lower conveyor;"

means to deliver material to the trays of the upper stretch of the upper conveyor; and angular shape member spaced from and above the trays to spread the material as it is delivered to the trays into a uniform layer upon the trays; guides extending along the lateral edges of the trays to prevent spilling the material from the lateral ends of the trays; means to spread the material upon the trays of the lower stretch of the conveyor as it is delivered thereto and the trays of the upper stretch of a succeeding lower conveyor, and means to cause heated air to circulate through the chamber.

6; In apparatus for dehydrating vegetables, the combination with means to steam and chill the vegetables of a drying chamber; means to cause the circulation of heated air through such chamber; and meansto transport the material to and fro in said chamber, comprising endless foraminous conveyors arranged to deliver the material from the upper stretch to the lower stretch of'one conveyor, and from the lower stretclr succeeding lower conveyor; means to deliver the material from the steaming and chilling means to the upper stretch of the upper conveyor and spread it into a uniform layer, means to spread the material as it-is delivered to the lower stretch of said conveyor and to a succeeding lower conveyor, for the purpose specified and means to co-operate with the conveyors to prevent spilling'of material from the lateral ends of the conveyor.

7 In apparatus the combination ofa drying chamber having an inlet at the bottom and an outlet at the top; means in said chamberto which the material to be dried is delivered to transport the material to and fro through said chamber; a furnace having an air jacket with an outlet in the lower portion connected to the lower portion of the drying chamber; and means to forcibly inject air into top'of the air jacket of the furnace, for the purpose specified.

'8. In apparatus for dehydrating material, a drying chamber; conveyors to transport material to and fro in superposed horizontal plates in said chambe spaced sprocket wheels around which the chains pass, a series of foraminous trays pivotally connected to and supported at their forward ends by the chains; means extend ing between the sprocket wheels upon which the trays are supported in theirtravel between the sprocket wheels; said support being arranged to permit the rear portion of for dehydrating material,

comprising chains,

the trays tp drop an dump the material from the trays of the upper stretch of the conveyor to the trays of the lower stretch I of the conveyor, and from the lower stretch of the conve or at a predetermined point in the travel 0 the trays; means to deliver the material to the trays of the upper stretch of the conveyor and spread the material into a uniform layer, observation openings in the wall of the chamber in line with the con- -'veyors, and means to cause heated air to pivotally connected and supported at their forward ends by the chains, means to support the trays at the rear of their pivotal support by the chains in their travel between the wheels and permit the rear p 1- tion of the trays to tip downward and ischarge the material therefrom, observation openings in the wall of the chamber having removable closures, an air heating element connected to the inlet of the chamber, and means to forcibly supply air to said element and cause a circulation of air through the drying chamber for the purpose specified.

JOSEPH E. KENNEDY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2422536 *Jan 11, 1943Jun 17, 1947Finnegan William JApparatus for treatment of foods by dehydration or refrigeration comprising trucks and a treating inclosure
US2446952 *Apr 11, 1942Aug 10, 1948Randolph Oliver WFruit and vegetable comminutor and drier
US2788732 *Jan 17, 1952Apr 16, 1957Spencer Templeton Robert AlexaApparatus for preparing dried food and other products
US3133797 *Apr 24, 1959May 19, 1964Pierson Olof PApparatus for dehydrating potatoes
US5293814 *Jan 9, 1992Mar 15, 1994Buhler GmbhApparatus for hydro-thermical treatment of starchy products, in particular rice
US8020316 *Feb 23, 2006Sep 20, 2011Bsh Bosch Und Siemens Hausgeraete GmbhWashing household device, in particular a clothes dryer
Classifications
U.S. Classification99/355, 99/476, 34/391, 99/357, 34/208, 34/61, 99/470, 99/443.00R
International ClassificationF26B15/00, F26B15/14
Cooperative ClassificationF26B15/146
European ClassificationF26B15/14C