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Publication numberUS1447723 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 6, 1923
Filing dateOct 31, 1922
Publication numberUS 1447723 A, US 1447723A, US-A-1447723, US1447723 A, US1447723A
InventorsImhof Et Al print
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Patemt offlceo
US 1447723 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1,447,723 J. A. IMHOF' ET AL PRINT AND PROCESS OF MAKING SAME Filed Oct. 51, 1922 1L sheets -sheet 1 Mar. 6, 1923.

INVENTORS ATTORNEY Mar. 6, 1923.

J. A. IMHOF ET AL PRINT AND PROCESS OF MAKING SAME sheet 2 4 sheets- Filed Oct.

A TTORNE Y Mar. 6, 1923.

J. A. lMHOF ET AL PRINT AND PROCESS OF MAKING SAME Filed Oct. 51, 1922 4 sheets-sheet 5 IN VEN TOR S A TTORNE Y Mar 6, 1923.

4 Sheets-sheet ,4

Filed Oct 51, 1922 A TTORNE Y till no im ression.

Patented Meir. 1%23.

on STATE ress-s rsrnnr series.

7 JOSEPH A. IMHOF, OF NEW YORK, AND JGHNCHARTERS; @F AEEURIA, NEW YORK, ASSIGNORS T0 INVISIBLE 63% PRINT CURPORA'K'ION, 023 It YQIRK, N. K, A

conromrion or NEW rons.

rs rnoonss on tannins sens.

Application filed lilctober s1, tees. stamens-{sooner T 0 allwhom it may concern:

Be it known that we, Joenm A. lemon and dorm C'nAnrnns, citizens of the United States, the former a resident of New York ocity, in the borough of Manhattan, county and State of New York, and the letter e res ident of Astoria, Long Island City, in the county of Queens and State of New'York,

have invented certain new and useful lmprovements in Prints and Processes of Melt; ing Some, of which the following is o speoification. This-invention relates to a print having disguisedimage which subsequently can be rendered visible and to the process of producing the same. Y ln the prior art of making prints, hidden images havebeen and hove been ren ered visible b the use of chemicals. The main object and feature of the present invention is to render the hidden object visible by the application of water without the use of special chemicals.

In theecc'om )anying drawings the inven-- tion is embodied in several concrete and preferred forms in which Figs. 1, 2, 3 and 4 show the steps of one form of the invention for producing a print with e hidden image and the revealing of the some.

1F igs. .5, t, 7 end 8 show the steps of enother form oi the invention for reducing a print with a hidden imsge end t e revealing of the some. Figs. 9 to it show other forms of the invention iii-which the letteris combined with the invention of Letters Potent No. 1,384,663 of July 12 192i. 1'

Fig. d shows the yellow impi'ession. Fig. ltl'shows the red impression.

ll. shows the blue impression. Fig. 12 shows the outline impression in blsclr.

-Fig. 13 shows the stop color or invisible V ig. it shows theessembly'ot Figs. 9 to 13 inclusive otter the wster is epphed.

.Figs' 15 end 16 show still another form of the invention'betore end sitter the water e pplied. bonsidering first Figs. 1 to at inclusive 1 indicates n printing surface of paper or other materiel cops le of receiving impressions. In Fig. 2 this surtsce is shown as (produced in venous Ways.

heving received en impression indicated for convenience by section lines 2 which forms it visible imege, in this instance covering the entire surface 1.. This impression is made with 'lnltfconslsting Wholly of or carrying )letent coloring matter such es oniline dye soluble'in' water es explained in Pete'nt No. 1,384,663Qdeted July 12, 1.921. It will be understood theti'd'asingle color only need be used end'thst this color may be the seine es the oily body ctirryin the some if such be employed. And furt or that the printing may be solid as when produced from 9. print-- mg surface of uniform. height or the printing may be produced by'printing from heliimage 3 indicated by the word President in dotted outline in Fig. 3. This image is made preferably with an impression of translucent varnish throu h which image 2 shows and image 3 is therefore both in soluble in water and invisible. Theimpre sion of image 8 msy be mode either from 21. solid form or from hslt'-tone plates or the like. If desired the varnish may be slightly tinted s o-es to match es near as possible the color or tone of the surtoce 1 before printin' The tint thus used may be it white oil in r. lit will now be understood thet, when water is s plied to the surface of. the print, the vsrnis the color of the underlying soluble impression while the exposed parts of the letter will be dissolved and the color released. -;ly contrast of color therefore, the invisible image 8 will appear or emerge as ShOWHllfl Fi will be understood. that the invislble imege may be either lettering or other design such es s, picture that the stopping-out msy be either oi the beclrground or of the image so long the color contrast is produced. in ones the stop-out impres sion is printed from s belt-tone plots some of the color of underlying visible imege will be released but not so sbundsntly es the exposed ports of the visible image end there willv therefore be enough difference in tone between the exposed end stooped-out ports to render the emergence oi the invisible ill Tli

impression will not to stop-out its classes of paper, notably newsprint paper, it is desirable to reverse the process just described and to proceed as shown in Figs. 5 to 8 inclusive. As there shown the surface receiving the impression is indicated by 1, and upon this surface is impressed, first, invisible image 3 (Fig. 6). Then the visible image 2 is superposed on the invisible image (Fig. 7 and finally water is applied to cause the invisible image to emerge (Fig. 8). In this form of the invention the invisible image printed in varnish tends to prevent the sinking in of the ink or coloring matter of the visible image. Consequently when water is subsequently applied the ink overlying the invisibleimage 'is washed off. in whole or in part thereby setting up the color contrast necessary to reveal the invisible image.

By means of the preceding examples the invention has been explained in its simplest embodiment. It will be evident however that its ramifications are very extensive, espe'cially when combined with the process of invisible color printing disclosed in Patent No. 1,384,663 dated July12, 1921. In Figs. 9, 1O arid 11 are shown respectively the yellow, red and blue components 4, 5 and 6 of a picture' These components are shown as being printed from half-tone plates and carry latent coloring matter. When superposed they present an image of apparently uniform color. Fig. 12 shows an outline impression 7 in black oil ink which is superposed on the other impressions, and Fig. 13 is the stop-color or invisible image impression 8. As will be seen here the invisible image is produced by stopping-out a part of the background surrounding the mannikin 9. When the impressions of Figs. 9 to 13 inclusive are superposed an effect (except for greater detail) approximating the image of Fig. 12 is produced, and this image is of an apparently uniform color. When water is applied the coloring matter is released producing difierent colors and turning the moon 10 into a mannikin 9 as shown in Fig. 14;. It will be noted that some of the stop color is printed on the two boys, especially on their heads 8 and on the upper portions of their backs 8 as well as on the patch 8 on the pants of one of the boys. The function of the stop-out color at these points is to in crease the high lights by preventing the re lease of the latent coloring matter.

In Figs. 15 and 16 is shown still another form of the invention. Here a number of visible impressions ll of apparently uni form color, having latent color, an invisible stop-out color (indicated at 12 in Fig. 16), and a visible image 13 in black ink are superposed. The visible image in black ink is here (Fig. 15) what appears to be the out line of clouds or shrubbery. When water is applied (Fig. 16) the invisible image 12 of a man emerges in outline as shown and the different parts of the visible image are colored differently. Thus the lower part 14: of the picture may be green, the trousers 15 brown, the coat 16 blue, the portions 17 adj acent the body and below the arms yellow, the hands and face flesh-colored and perhaps variously tinted and the portions 18 adjacent the head and above the arms reenish-blue. Now in this instance of the invention the visible image 13 in black ink, i. e., the outline of clouds or shrubbery, serves to disguise a possible variation in appearance due to a mingling of dots of two different plates that may take place. Where two partial im ages meet when faulty registratlon occurs,- such faulty registration causes the images to overlap thereby possibly revealing by increase in the number of dots the outline of the invisible image.

\Ve claim:

1. As a new article of manufacture: a print having a plurality of superimposed impressions, one of which is visible and soluble in water and another of which is insoluble in water and substantially invisible.

2. As a new article of manufacture: a print, of apparently uniform color, having a plurality of superimposed impressions two or more of which form a visible image containing latent and different coloring matter soluble in water and another of which is insoluble in water and substantially invisible.

3. As a new article of manufacture: a print having a visible image formed by an impression containing matter that is soluble in water and having a substantially invisi ble image formed bv an impression insoluble in water, the two impressions being superimposed one upon the other.

4. As a new article of manufacture: a

print having a visible image of apparently uniform color formed by a plurality of impressions that contain latent and dilferent coloring matter soluble in water, and having a substantially invisible image formed by an impression insoluble in water.

5. As a new article of manufacture: a print having a plurality of superimposed impressions forming a visible image and a substantially invisible image, the invisible image being rendered visible by contrast in color of the images upon application of water to the surface of the print.

6.As a new article of manufacture: a print having a plurality of superimposed impressions, one of which is visible andcontains matter soluble in water and another of which is a translucent varnish.

7. As anew article of manufacture: a print of apparently uniform color, having a plurality of superimposed impressions two or more of which form a visible image containing latent and different coloring matter soluble in water, and another of which is a translucent varnish.

amas printed product which consists in printing a plurality of impressions on a surface, one of said impressions, being visible and containing matter soluble in water, and another of said impressions being insoluble in Water and substantially invisible, and in thenap plying Water to said surface to render the invisible impression visible a contrast in color of the several impressions.

10. The method of disguising and of subsequently rendering apparent a design in a printed product which consists in printing a plurality of superimposed impressions on a surface, one of said impressions being visible and containing matter soluble in wat'er, and another of said impressions being insoluble in water and substantially invisible, and then applying water to said surtace to ram derthe invisible impression visible by a contrast in color of the several impressions.

ill. The method of disguising and ot sub sequently rendering apparent a design in a printed product which consists in printing upon a surface a plurality of impressions two of which have latent and different coloring matter soluble in Water; but presenting an image of apparently uniform color, and another of which is insoluble, in water and forming a substantially invisible image, and then applying Water tosaidpsurface to render 'the invisible image visible by a contrast in color of the several images.

12. The method of disguising-and of subsequently rendering apparent a design in a printed product which consists in imprinting. on a surface, a visible image formed by an impression soluble upon application of water, then imprinting upon; said surface in superimposed relation to the first impression, another substantially invisible image formed by an impression insoluble in water, and then applying Water to said surface to dissolve the exposed parts of the image of the first impression to thereby render the image of the second impression visible by a contrast in colors between the two images.

13. The method of disguising and of subsequently rendering apparent a design in a printed product which consists in printing a plurality of impressions on a surfacaione or said impressions being visible and containmg matter soluble in; water, and another of said impressions being of translucent var? nish and therefore invisible and insoluble in Water, and in then applying water to said c surface to render the invisible impression visible by a contrast in color ol the several impressions. v

14:. The method otdisguising and of sub sequently rendering apparent a design a printed product which consists in printing a plurality of superimposed impressions on a surface, of saidimpressions being; visible and containing matter soluble in Water, and an other of said impressions being of translucent varnish and therefore invisible and insoluble in Water, and in then applying water to said surface to render the invisible im= pression visible by color of several impressions.

it. The method of disguising and oil suosequently rendering apparent design in product which consists in printing; upon surface a plurality of impressions two of hich have latent and ditl'ereht coloringn. soluble in Water but presentinr "1! an of apparently uni-form color, and anotlir of said impressions being of translucent varnish and therefore invisibleiand insoluble in Water, in then applying" water to said surface to render the invisible impression visible by contrast in color of the several impressions.

16. The method of disguising and of subsequently rendering apparent a design in a printed product which consists in imprinting, on a surlacm'a visible image -formed by an impression soluble upon application of Water, then imprinting upon said surface, in superimposed relation to the first'impression, another substantially invisible image formed by an impression of translucent varnish, and then applying water to said surface to dissolve the exposed parts of the image of the first impression to thereby render the image of the second impression visible by a contrast in colors between the two images.

17. As a new article of manufacture a print having a plurality of impressions, two or more of which form a visible image of apparently uniform color but containing latent and different coloring matter, soluble in "Water, another impression, insoluble in water, forming a visible image and acting'to disguise the overlapping oi adjacent edges of thetwo first impressions, and still another and insoluble impression forming an invisible ima'gawhereby the three images merge into a unitary image having color contrasts when water is applied to the surface of the print.

Signed at New York city, in the [borough of Manhattan. county and State of New York, this 2% day or ()ctober, 1922.

JDSEPH A. ll /lHOF. JOHN CHARTERS.

Mill

lllll

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4360548 *Oct 24, 1980Nov 23, 1982The Standard Register CompanySelf-contained covert image
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/199, 283/97, 427/145, 427/411, 428/201
Cooperative ClassificationD21H21/46