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Publication numberUS1454107 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 8, 1923
Filing dateJul 18, 1919
Publication numberUS 1454107 A, US 1454107A, US-A-1454107, US1454107 A, US1454107A
InventorsEdwaeb T. Currait
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mqoid-cooling radiator
US 1454107 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May s, 1923.

E. T. CURRAN LIQUID COOLING RADIATOR F`iled July 18 1919 Invenor: ECar/n Patented May 8, 1923.

UNITED STATES EDWARD T. CURRAN, 0F DETROIT, MICHIGAN.

LIQUID-COOLING RADIATOR.

Application filed J'uly 18, 1919. Serial Na. 311,861.

To all whom t may concern Be it known that I, EDWARD T. CURRAN, a citizen of the United States, residing in Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan, have invented new and useful Improvements in Liquid-Cooling Radiators, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to liquid or water cooling radiators for use in connection with internal combustion engines to cool the cooling medium for the cylinders of the engine and in which the liquid is cooled by conducting the liquid in passages with air spaces between the same from a tank or reservoir for the heated liquid from the engine to a tank or reservoir for the cooled liquid and from which latter tank the liquid is delivered to the cooling jacket of the engine.

It is an object of the invention to arrange the water conducting passages to present a large surface for the forcible impingement of the air against such tubes in its passage through the spaces between the tubes thereby greatly increasing the cooling etliciency thereof, and to separate the reservoir for the heated liquid into compartments having communication with each other and with which compartments different portions of the tubes communicate, and arrange the inlet to said reservoir` so as to direct the incoming liquid to certain of the compartments and cause it to flow or circulate through the passages adjacent opposite sides of the radiator when the liquid is at a low temperature, comparatively speaking, and the partitions for the compartments serving as spillways over which the liquid passes to the next adjacent compartment to flow through the passages connected to such compartments, by a rise in temperature of the liquid and the consequent boiling and expansion `of the liquid and thereby increasing the normal radiating surface for the liquid.

It is a 'further object of the invention to provide in a radiator in which the liquid conducting and cooling passages comprise parallel and spaced vertical tubes of thin sheet material, means to be inserted in the spaces between the respective tubes to prevent undue expansion and the consequent rupturing or colpasing of the tubes, and so arrange such means as to direct the air passing through the spaces between the tubes in different'directionstoward the engine usually located at the rear of the radiator to aid in the cooling of the engine by such air currents; and to arrange such means asto form obstructions and surfaces for the impingement and consequent agitation of the air in its passage through the spaces between the passages.

A further object of the invention is to arrange the reservoir for the heated liquid with an enlarged or extended portion to serve as an expansion chamber or space for the liquid thus obviating the necessity of an overflow outlet for any expansion of the liquid in the radiator.

In the drawing accompanying and forming a part of this specification, Figure 1 is a perspective view, partly in section, looking at the front of a liquid cooling radiator illustrating an embodiment of my invention.

Figure 2 is a sectional side elevation'taken substantially midway through Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a sectional plan view to show the arrangement of the liquid circulating passages.

Figure 4: is a perspective detail view to show the arrangement of the means inserted in the spaces between the passages to prevent undue expansion of the passages and to direct the air currents to the rear of the radiator in a predetermined direction.

' Figure 5 is a perspective view and Figure 6 an end elevation of a portion of the means shown in Figure 4 arranged with portions stamped therefrom to form obstructions to retard and agitate the air in its passage through the radiator. Y

Similar characters of reference designate like parts in the different views of the drawing.

The embodiment of my invention shown in the drawing comprises a reservoir or tank 7 having an inlet S for the liquid to lbe cooled, and a'reservoir 9 for the cooled liquid having an outlet 10, said reservoirs being supported and connected in spaced relation by side members 11 to provide an open frame structure. and the side members provided with brackets 11 to secure the radiator to a support. The reservoir 7 has an opening in a tubular projection 12 closed by a removable cap 13. q

The reservoirs 7 and 9 are connected in liquid circulation by a series of parallel and spaced flattened vertical tubes 14, preferably greater in cross sectional area from the front to the rear than the width. These tubes are arranged to extend from the front to the rear of the radiator at an obtuse angle to `ter ot the radiator.

the front of the radiator whereby a side surface of the tubes is presented for the impingement of the air in its passage through the spaces between the tubes, thus presenting` an enlarged surface for the air to forcibly strike against, it having been demonstrated that the force with which the impacts or strikes against a heated body is animportant factor in such air taking up and absorbing heat radiated Vtrom such body. The tubes 14 are so arranged that the tubes at opposite sides of the center ol' the radiator incline inwardly or converge in a direction toward the center of the radiator, with one or more of the tubes at the center extending substantially parallel to the side members 11, as shown in Figure 3, and thus obvi ating an enlarged space between the tubes at the cen- Experience has shown that the liquid passing through the passages 141 adjacent the sides of the radiator will cool more quickly than the liquid passing through the tubes centrally olil t radiator, and that the cooling efficiency ot the pas-- sages or tubes decreases the farther they are in from the sides with the passages or tubesin the middle oic the radiator having the lowest cooling efliciency. lli/leans are, therefore, provided to cause the initial flow oil the heated liquid to the outermost tubes. For this purpose dams or spillways 15, 16 are provided which are in the nature of pr-- titions extending from the front to the back and from the bottom to adjacent the top of the reservoir 7 separa-ting said reservoir into a series of chambers 17, 17 18, 18 and 18 having communication ov-er the top of the partitions. To direct the incoming liquid to the chambers 17 a tubular member 26 is provided which extends along the low- .er rear portion ot the reservoir and opens at opposite ends into the chambers 17 with theinlet 8 in communication with said member 26 at a point between its ends, Ry this arrangement the incoming liquid is directed to the chambers 17 and circulates through the passages 14 in connection with said ch bers tolr conduct the liquid to the reservoir 9. As the liquid heats up and .begins to boil due to a rise in temperature it will spill over the top or the partitions 15 to the chambers 18 land circulate through the passages 111 in communication. withisaid chambers thereby increasingthe cooling for heat radiating sinn tacos of :the radiator for the liquid ils the temperature of the liquid rises and begins to boil the chambers 18 it will spill over the dams 15 into the central chambers 18 and circulate throunjhthe passages 11i in communicationiwith said chambers thus "hirther increasing the "circulating or Vcooling` area or outflow :of the liquid from the reservoir `7.

The tubes'lt are made of relatively thin and ilight material, and to prevent rupturing `and collapsing of the tubes by the expansion traction oif the material oil? the tubes.

thereof due to an increase in the temperature el? the liquid `passing therethrough or otherwise, means are provided to engage in the spaces between the tubes, said means being in the nature ot a comparativelyv stiff but somewhat flexible bridge or bridges 21 (Figure Ll) comprising a strip oi' sheet material transversely corrugated or crimped. These bridge members are inserted in thel spaces between the tubes with alternate bends or" the flutes ot' the corrugations engaging opposite tubes. 1t will be obvious that while the bends oil? the flutes will lirmly engage the tubes they will yield slightly to accommodatethemselves to the expansion and con- The bends of the corrugations iorm passageways for the air throughy the spaces between the tubes and to cause the air currents to converge at the rear oithe radiator.v For this purpose the corrugations atthe middle portion of the strips extend at right angles to the iront edge oit the strip, while the corrugations adjacent the ends or' the strip in-` cline at an obtuse angle to the front end ot' the strip, the corrugations adjacent the top of the strip inclining downward while those at the bottom of the strip incline upward. By this arrangement the air passing through the radiator is directedy to the engine, usually located at the rear of the radiator, and materially aiding in the cooling of the engine. Furthermore7 inclining the tubes la at opposite sidesot the center of the radiator as above set forth greatly facili tates the directing of the air against the enlgine.

As stated the forcewith which a current of air impacts orfstrikes against a heated i object is an important factor in the air cooling ot such objectyand while the corrugated strips, to which the heat is transmitted from the tubes la, present alarge ci-iolinn` surface to the air to further augment the cooling 'eiiiciency of these corrugated strips portions are stamped and pressed therefrom, as shown at @Si tov project into the air channels to form obstructions for the air to strile against, which also retard and cause the air to be agitated in its passage through the ran dator.'

To provide for expansion of the liqidin the radiator as the temperature rises, the reservoir 7 has a lateral extension 25 at the top, which is in the'nature .of an expansion chamber. It will be obvious that as expansion of `the liquid takes place the increased volume will enter such space, and as contraction takes place 'by the cooling of lthe liquid it will readily run into the reservoir in the reservoir T and the directing ot the incoming liquid to the outer compartments 1T that the circulation of the liquid will be through said compartments, the tubes 14 connected therewith and the reservoir 9, and to prevent freezing of any liquid in the tubes in communication with the compartments 18 in the use of the radiator in cold weather there are restricted outlets through the wall of the member 26 into the chambers 18 to permit sufficient of the heated liquid to enter said chambers to heat the liquid therein and the connected tubes to prevent freezing.

Variations may be resorted to within the scope of my invention and portions may be used Without others.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

l. In liquid cooling radiators, vertical tubes arranged in parallel and spaced relation, and corrugated members to engage in the spaces between the tubes with the con rugations arranged to cause the air currents passing through the spaces to converge in the rear of the radiator.

2. In a liquid cooling radiator, transversely extending and spaced tubes, and corrugated members to engage in the spaces between the tubes with the corrugations at the middle portion of the member extending at right angles to the front of the radiator, and the corrugations adjacent the ends extending at an obtuse angle to the front ot the radiator.

3. In liquid cooling radiators. vertical tubes arranged in parallel and spaced relation, and means to engage in the spaces between the tubes to reinforce the tubes and arranged to cause the air passing through said spaces to converge at the rear of the radiator.

4;. In liquid cooling radiators, transverse tubes arranged in parallel and spaced relation, and corrugated members to engage in the spaces between the tubes, said tubes and the corrugated members being arranged to cause the air currents passing through the spaces between the tubes to converge in the rear of the radiator.

5. In liquid cooling radiators, a series ot parallel and spaced vertical tubes, and ycorrugated members to engage in the spaces bctween the tubes, the corrugations at the middle portion of said members being at right angles to the front of the radiator, with the corrugations adjacent the top inclining downward and inward from the front to the rear of the radiator and the corruga-tions adjacent the lower end inclining upward and inward from the front to t-he rear oi' the radiator for the purpose specified.

6. In liquid cooling radiators, a series of parallel and spaced vertical attened tubes arranged with a flattened side to extend at an obtuse angle to the front of the radiator, and corrugated members to engage in the spaces between the tubes with the corrugations arranged to cause the air passing through the spaces to converge in the rear of the radiator.

7. In liquid cooling radiators, a series of parallel and spaced vertical attened tubes, with the tubes arranged at one side of the center of the radiator to incline at an obtuse angle from the front to the rear of the radiator, and the tubes at the opposite side of the center of the radiator inclining at the same angle but in an opposite direction; and corrugated members to engage in the spaces between the tubes, the corrugations at the middle of said members being at right angles to the front of the radiator with the corrugations adjacent the top inclining downward and inward Jfrom the 'front to the rear of the radiator and the corrugations adjacent the lower end inclining upward and inward from the front to the rear of the radiator' for the purpose specified.

8. In liquid cooling radiators, a reservoir for the heated liquid having an inlet; a reservoir for the cooled liquid; fiattened tubes in parallel and spaced relation to conduct the liquid from one reservoir to the other and arranged at an angle to the front of the radiator to present a fiat-tened side of said tubes for the impingement of the air in its passage through the spaces between the tubes; partitions in the reservoir for the heated liquid to separate said reservoir into chambers having communication with each other over the top of said partitions, and the inlet to said reservoir arranged to direct the incoming liquid to the two outermost chambers Jfor the purpose specified.

9. In liquid cooling radiators reservoirs for the heated and cooled liquid; Hat parallel and spaced liquid passages to connect said reservoirs in circulation: and trans versely corrugated members interposed between said passages to form air passages between the liquid passages from the front to the rear of the radiators with the corrugations arranged to cause the air to converge in the rear of the radiator, said corrugated members having portions stamped therefrom to form perforations in the corrugated members.

10. In a radiator a core composed of flat parallel spaced tubes, and spacers for said tubes composed of transversely corrugated plates, said corrugations being arranged to incline downwardly7 and upwardly from the front to the rear of the core for the purpose specified.

EDWARD T. CURRAN.

Referenced by
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US6125926 *Jul 24, 1998Oct 3, 2000Denso CorporationHeat exchanger having plural fluid passages
US6161616 *May 5, 1998Dec 19, 2000Valeo Kilmatechnik Gmbh & Co., KgHard-soldered flat tube evaporator with a dual flow and one row in the air flow direction for a motor vehicle air conditioning system
US6840312 *Feb 23, 2000Jan 11, 2005Outokumpu OyjCooling element for a heater exchange
US6883598 *Jun 16, 2003Apr 26, 2005Outokumpu OyjCooling element for a heat exchanger
US7234515 *Nov 18, 2005Jun 26, 2007Behr Gmbh & Co.Heat exchanger for a motor vehicle
US7614442 *Jun 28, 2005Nov 10, 2009Scania Cv Ab (Publ)Heat exchanger
US20040031597 *Jun 16, 2003Feb 19, 2004Per SandbergCooling element for a heat exchanger
US20060070729 *Nov 18, 2005Apr 6, 2006Behr Gmbh & Co.Heat exchanger for a motor vehicle
US20090025920 *Jun 28, 2005Jan 29, 2009Morgan CollingHeat exchanger
EP1574801A2 *Feb 24, 2005Sep 14, 2005Modine Manufacturing CompanyHeat exchanger and corrugated fin
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/153, 165/DIG.487
International ClassificationF28F1/12
Cooperative ClassificationY10S165/487, F28F1/128, F28F9/0265
European ClassificationF28F1/12D2, F28F9/02S4