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Publication numberUS1454364 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 8, 1923
Filing dateAug 8, 1919
Priority dateAug 8, 1919
Publication numberUS 1454364 A, US 1454364A, US-A-1454364, US1454364 A, US1454364A
InventorsLester P Winchenbaugh, Gentile Lawrence
Original AssigneeLester P Winchenbaugh Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process of applying coloring liquid to paper
US 1454364 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 8, 1923. 1,454,364

L. P. WINCHENBAUGH ET AL.

PROCESS OF APPLYING COLORING LIQUID TO PAPER Filed Aug. 8, 1919 LESTER r; wmonmauen, or

massaonusn'r'rs; assreuons rommassaonosnrzrs, a conroaa'rrou or massacnusnr'rs.

HYDE PARK, AND Lawnnucn cnn'rrnn, or mmnosn, TO LESTER r. wmcnnnnaucn comram, or nos- PROCESS OF A.'PPLYING COLORING LIQUID T IPAPEB.

Application filed August 8, 1919. Serial No. 316,235.

To all whom it may concem:

Be it known that we, LESTER P. WINoH ENBAUGH and Lawrence GENTILE, citizens of the United States, residing, respectively,

at Hyde Park and Melrose, in the counties of Suffolk and Middlesex and State of Massachusetts, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in the Processes of Applying Coloring Liquid to Paper; and we do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertainsto make and use the same.

This invention relates to a process ofap plying dye, stain or other coloring liquid to paper or similar material.

The primary object of the invention is to produce a process for use in applying coloring liquid to paper by which novel designs and artistic effects may be produced in an eflicient and reliable manner. 1

With the above object in view the invention consists in a process involving certain novel features hereinafter described and particularly pointed out in the claims.

In the drawing the figure is a view in side. elevation of an apparatus which may be employed in carrying out certain steps in the present process.-

In the present process a coloring liquid is employed which in practice has been made by dissolving a dye in a liquid solvent. The dye substances which are used should be such that they are completely soluble in the liquid solvent, leaving no sediment. Preferably coal tar or aniline dyes are employed, such dyes having in addition to their ready solubility the property of transparency which enables almost countless variations in color and designs tobe produced by the posed relation at certain points. It has been found particularly advantageous'to employ as solvents for the dye alcohol, gasoline or similar organic solvents since such solvents produce a rapidly drying solution and cause the coloring liquid 'to penetrate the paper to a considerable degree, thereby increasing the artistic effect of the design.

After the dye is completely dissolved. in the liquid solvent the coloring liquid is introduced into a suitable container from which it may be drawn for transfer to the paper.

and the paper sothat the fabric .receptable in just there is never any excess of liquid at application ,of the colors in super- To withdraw the coloring liquid from the container in the regulated quantity required for transfer to the paper a section of sheet fabric is introduced into the liquid in the container and is arranged with one end projecting from the liquid. This section of sheet fabric must be made of such material and must be so constructed that the coloring liquid will be drawn from the container through the same by capillary action. Certain kinds-of woven wool felt have been found to be well adapted for this purpose.

The coloring liquid may be transferred from the fabric to the paper by placing the paper in-contact'with the end of the fabric,"

which projects from the color containing' receptacle and relatively moving the fabric is carried along the surface of the paper. The coloring liquid will thus be Withdrawn from the the amount required for the paper, the liquid being the fabric to the end thereof application to drawn through which engages the paper as fast as it is applied to the paper. The quantity of liquid withdrawn is regulated by" the fabric so the point of application to form blots or other imperfections in the designs.

The coloring liquid may .be ap lied to the paper in stripes or streaks by notching the edge of the fabric which engagesthe paper. Two or more colors may be applied to the paper at the same time by the use of two or more sections of fabric each dipping into a separate receptacle and engaging the surfaceof the paper at different points. When two or more transparent colors such as are formed by the use of solutions of transparent dyes are applied so that at certain points the colors overlap or are superposed, variations in the resultant colors from the colors applied are produced giving highly artistic effects.

The amount of color paper may be regulated by the use of fabrics of different thicknesses, the greater the thickness of the fabric the more rapid the flow of the liquid therethrough. Also the amount of the liquid deposited on the paper may be varied by varying-the rapidity of the relative movement of the fabric and the discharged upon the;

paper. The greater the speed with which surface of the roll.

the paper is passed, along the'edge of the fabric the less will be the amount of the coloring liquid deposited on the paper. The distribution of the coloring liquid will also vary with variations in the construction of the fabric employed llnstead of engag the paper directly with the fabricto transfer the coloring liquid from the fabric to the paper, the fabric may be engaged with a roll or other color receiving device intermediate the fabric and the paper and carried by this device from the fabric to the paper. The figure of the drawing illustrates an apparatus which may be advantageously employed in transferring the liquid from the fabric to the'paper in this way. In the illustrated construction the coloring liquid is contained in a receptacle 2 and a section of sheet fabric indicated at t is located with one end thereofdipping into the liquid in the receptacle and with the other end thereof resting on a roll indicated at 6 and is held in contact therewith by a weight 8. Below the roll 8 is a cooperating roll 10 between which and the roll 6 the paper is passed as clearly shown in the drawing. lln the operation the rolls are rotated in the directions indicated by the arrows.

The surface of the roll 6 is formed with elevations and depressions having any suitable fo and arrangementto draw the liquid as required from the fabric, and the fabric d thus contacts with and deposits the coloring liquid upon the high points on the then transferred by the roll 6 to the paper as it passes between the rolls in a design corresponding with the design formed on the surface of the roll 6. The roll 10 may have a smoothperiphery if desired. lln the illustrated construction, however the surface of the roll 10 is also provided with elevations and depressions corresponding with those on the roll 6 so that the paper is embossed in passing between the rolls.

The mechanism above described is illustrated, described and claimedin applicants copending application Serial No. 316,233., filed on the same date as the present application. Tn an application Serial No. 316,- 234:, also filed on the same date, applicants have illustrated and described a process related in certain aspects to the present process.

Having explained the nature and object of the invention, and having specifically described the manner in which it may be applied what is claimed is: J

l. The process ofmaking colored paper which comprises withdrawing a solution of a dye in alcohol or asimilar solvent from a supply in regulated quantity through a capillary. sheet fabric and progressively transferring the regulated quantity of the The coloring liquid is I rate-pea solution thus withdrawn to a moving sheet of paper.

2.; The process of making colored paper which comprises withdrawing a solution of a dye in alcohol or a similar solvent from a supply in regulated quantity through a sheet of capillar fabric, progressively transferring the so ution from the fabric to a moving color receivingdevice and applying the solution transferred to said receiving device to the paper by passing the paper past said receiving device in contact therewith.

3. The process of making colored paper which comprises withdrawing a solution of a dye in alcohol or a similar solvent from a supply in regulated quantity through a section of capillary sheet fabric, transferring the solution from the fabric as it is withdrawn from the supply to a rotating color receiving roll and applying the solution to the paper by passing the paper along the roll in the direction of movement of the roll and incontact therewith.

4C. The process of making colored paper which comprises applying continuously to paper a penetrative solution of a dye in quantity regulated by capillary action and suflicient to cause the same to penetram the paperand spread from the point of application.

5. The process of making ornamental paper which comprises applying a highly penetrative coloring liquid to the paper and embossin the paper while it is wet with the coloring liquid.

6. The process of making ornamental paper which comprises embossing paper by passing the same between a pair of embossing rolls and simultaneously applying a highly penetrative coloring liquid to the paper by applying said liquid to one of said rolls and transferring the liquid to the paper during the passage of the paper between the rolls.

7. The process of making ornamental capillary action and sufiicient to cause the same to'penetrate the paper and to spread from the point of application.

9. The process of 'making colored paper M which comprises applying to paper a solution of an aniline dye in alcohol inquantity regulated by capillary action and sufficient to cause the same to penetratethe paper and to spread from the point of application.

LESTER 1P. WTNCIHUENBAUGH. LAWRENCE GENTIULE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6148496 *Apr 9, 1999Nov 21, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod for making a seamless apertured metal belt
US6193918Apr 9, 1999Feb 27, 2001The Procter & Gamble CompanyHigh speed embossing and adhesive printing process and apparatus
US6421052Apr 9, 1999Jul 16, 2002The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of seaming and expanding amorphous patterns
US6602454Jan 11, 2001Aug 5, 2003The Procter & Gamble CompanyHigh speed embossing and adhesive printing process and apparatus
US6773647Jan 10, 2002Aug 10, 2004The Procter & Gamble CompanyHigh speed embossing and adhesive printing process and apparatus
US6872342May 31, 2002Mar 29, 2005The Procter & Gamble CompanyEmbossing and adhesive printing process
Classifications
U.S. Classification8/484, 101/32, 8/151, 8/919, 8/497, 8/486, 8/611, 8/485
International ClassificationD21H21/28, D21H23/54, D21H27/02
Cooperative ClassificationD21H21/28, D21H23/54, D21H27/02, Y10S8/919
European ClassificationD21H27/02