Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1454821 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 8, 1923
Filing dateJun 24, 1920
Priority dateJun 24, 1920
Publication numberUS 1454821 A, US 1454821A, US-A-1454821, US1454821 A, US1454821A
InventorsMetzner Albert W, Sherman John Q
Original AssigneeSherman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flat-bed multicopy machine
US 1454821 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 8, 1923.

J. Q. SHERMAN ET AL' FLAT BED MULTICYOPY MACHINE Filed June 24, 1920 5 Sheets-Sheet oooooooooood May 8, 1923; 1,454,821

J. Q. SHERMAN ET AL FLAT BED MULTICOPY MACHINE Filed June 24, 1920 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 a q n g Q q N lllllllllil N Q N w v N 0 0 on o 00 o o o o o o 0 #vvmvrwms: z F W -fi o 0 Q 231k 0 3] W W *1 Z Z Z Z 3 3 o 0 j j H W A T TOR/V575 May 8, 1923.

J. Q. SHERMAN ET AL FLAT BEb MULTICOPY MACHINE Filed June 24 1920 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 May 8, 1923.

J. Q. SHERMAN ET AL FLAT BED MULTICOPY MACHINE Filed June 24 [.1920 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 //VI//V7'0/?S.' (Q 3 M W 09, M BY Arra/P/vz s,

' May 8, 1923.

J. QJSHERMAN ET AL FLAT BED MULTICOPY MACHINE 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 7 Filed June 24, 1920 Patented JOHN Q. SHERMAN AND ALBERT'W. 'METZNER, OIKD AYTON, OHIO; SAID ME'IZNER ASSIGNOR T SAID SHERMAN.

FLAT-BED MULTICOPY MACHINE.

Application filed June 24,

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that we, JOHN Q. SHERMAN- and ALBERT W. METZNER, citizens of the United States, and residents of Dayton,in

the following is a full, clear, and exact de scription, reference being had .to the draw ings-forming part of this'specification.

Our invention relates particularly to fiat bed manifolders wherein continuous webs of paper are drawn over a, flat bed, and there held in position, while a type writer, which moves over the bed, makes impressions on the various films, through the interposition of carbon paper or its equivalent.

So far as we are advised no machine in the past has been successful which employed a large number of continuous webs of paper in a manifolding operation, although several designs of machines have been offered on the market and then withdrawn on account of failure.

all flat bed machines which make large numbers of copies require the use of separate sheets of paper, which must be arranged with interposed carbon sheets, and collated into bundles, having accurate alignment after which they. are clamped to the bed 0 1 the machine.

It is our object to avoid this laborious collating as well as the constant error which is likely to creep in through omission of carbon sheets, omission of necessary paper sheets, improper alignment, and the like, and l to do this by providing a roll paper machine of the flat had type.

We have developed in this connection a .9 number of instrumentalities, some of which are an absolute requisite for. success in a machine of this type according to our investigations, and some of which improve the 7 operation of such machines. 1

Among these instrumentalities are the aligning of the sheets laterally, by means of marginal holes or the like punched in the paper of the various webs in accurate relation to the printing thereon, thisalignment to be done automatically. We alsoprovide a means for insuring a loose condition of all webs and means for aligning them longitudinally while so loosely held, in combina- According to our information, 7

1920. Serial No. 391,499.

tion with means for maintaining the various strips tightly and flatly against the flat bed of the machine. L

We also provide means for an easy, nonfrictional passage of the various webs of paper over the carbon paper strips or the like, that may be used, and for jogging the carbon paper loose from the webs of paper,

should it become gummy or adherent because of the type impressions therein, thus acting to impede the free longitudinal play of the webs during the longitudinal alignment thereof,'and seriously interfering with the pulling-out operation.

Then, too, in connection with the carbon paper and the terminal bar, or tearing ofi' bar, we provide means whereby automatic operated mechanism serves to free the webs of paper from being clamped between tightly bound carbon sheets and whereby the strips are released beneath the tearing 01f bar to permit the said longitudinal alignment and as an aligning mechanism we employ jogging pins, which in co-operation with terminal holes in the individual forms,

serve to accurately align the printing on said forms.

We accomplish these various objects and provisions and other advantages to be, noted,

by that certain construction and arrangement of parts to be hereinafter more specifically pointed out and claimed.

In the drawings,

Figure 1 is a perspective view of the complete device, omitting the rear cabinet.

Figure 2 is a detail perspective of the storage roll rack on which the rolls of paper are to be mounted. I Figure 3 is'a detail front elevation of the sliding mechanism in which the carbon paper is held. p

Figure 4 is a plan view of one of the sliding frames of the mechanism shown in Figure 3.

Figure 5 is a detail elevation of one of the operatin forks for said mechanism.

Figure 6 (sheet 1) is a detail perspective showing the clamping finger on the type- Figure 8 is a detail elevation, partly in section showing the carbon paper mounting and clamping mechanism.

Figure 9 is an elevation of the, carbon paper roll mounting.

Figure 10 is a'perspective view of the inner clamping bar'element for retaining the carbon paper.-

Figure 11 is a perspective view of the removable or drop in clamping bar, for the carbon paper.

Figure 12 is a perspective view of the spring plate mounting for the aligning pins on a scale smaller than the other views on Sheet 3.

Figure 13 is a detail vertical section of the machine at the point of attachment of the parts shown in Figure 12.

Figure 14 is a top plan view of the parts shown in Figure 13.

Figure 15 is an end elevation of the parts shown in Figure 14.

Figure 16 is a detail side elevation of one of the controlling cams and paperclamping bars.

Figure 17 is a perspective detail of the guards for protecting the carbon paper and the mounting means therefor.

Figure 18 is a view of one of the pin wheel idler devices for lateral adjustment.

Figure 19 is a perspective detail showing more or less diagrammatically the operation of the carbon paper guards.

Referring first to the frame-work of the machine, it will be observed that the side standards or plates 1, 1, support the typewriter supporting and. platen frame 2, 2, over which the typewriter 3 is moved, the construction being similar to any standard form of fiat bed typewriters. It will ordinarily be our practice to provide a cabinet of some desired form to enclose the paper mounting and guiding devices at the rear of the standards and guides now referred to. No such cabinet is shown, for purposes of clearness in the drawings. v

As shown in Figure 2 (Sheet 2) of the drawings, a rack for mounting the spindles of paper rolls, is provided. The two side bars- 4, are connected preferably at the base by a base bar 5. k On the one side bar there are cross arms 6, 6, having in each arm a pair of holes 7, 7 There are like cross arms-8, 8, on the other side bar which have angled slots 8 therein, into which may be dropped the one end of a paper roll spindle 9, the other end being set in the proper hole at the other side of the frame.

Sliding on the 'bar having the slotted cross arms is another bar 10, which carries a set of segment shaped arms 11. When this bar 10 is in its lower position the arms 11 lie over the slots and keep the roll spindles in Place. The bar 10 is. provided with a handle 12, which includes in its structure 8.

--roll, said idlers being set into the sides of the machine, in any desired way. The paper rolls 17 mounted over the spindles in the rack now described, are ordinarily made up of long webs of paper printed alike into forms, which it is desired to fill out in multiple, all printing being made on each form,

in perfect alignment both transversely and longitudinally of the forms.

The webs are brought from the rolls and passed under the idlers, the top and bottom webs only being indicated by the reference letters A and B, the lowermost roll of paper furnishing, the uppermost web of paper on the machine platen.

The webs of paper are formed with a set .of marginal holes 18, preferably along each margin inside the edge thereof, these holes being punched in uniform and accurate relation to the printing for each strip. Also each form has punched at the forward end thereof, a plurality of holes 19, samebeing lar er, ordinarily than the marginal holes.

As will be noted, the marginal holes are employed for providing a lateral adjustment for the various webs, therebynot only to bring the longitudinal lines on the forms into absolute registry witheach other, but also preserving the larger terminal holes 19 into such alignment laterally that it is pos:

sible to insert through them suitable alig'n i'ng pins, after the webs have been drawn over the writing surface of platen. The large holes 19 are then employe into accurate registry.

to the stretching ofpaper lengthwise and inaccurate lateral cutting, the forms will not be of the same length or width. The use of the holes for aligning in both directions thereby results in a perfect alignment, which so far as we are advised, is not possible in any other way.

As indicative of the usefulness of a large,

number of copies of the same form, it may be noted that in business houses. it is good practice to have the following copies made out as soon as orders are received. ('1). Office order for filing. (2). Invoice tobe used when goods are shipped.- (3). Shop order.

(4). Shipping order. (5) Assembly order. (6). Oflice copy of invoice. (7). Prospective commission estimate. (8). Acknowledgement of order. (9). Credit department d; .0 aligning the webs longitudinally thereby bringing all transverse lines of thefwebs copy of shipment. (10). Sales department copy of commission estimate. (11). Agents notice of shipment, and (12). Agents acknowledgement of order.

As is evident all of these forms require thesame information thereon, and the making of the various forms at once upon receipt of the order results in complete advices to every one concerned in the order,

and a constant check to each department to avoid error.

After leaving the idler rolls, the paper webs are brought up over the lateral alignment frame, Figure 1. This frame is made up of side bars 20, connected together by pins 21, over which are set rolls 22. These rolls carry at their en ds, or possibly at one end only. a series of radial pins 23 of tapered nature and of a size to engage readily into the marginal holes in the paper, successive pins engaging successive holes.

The side bars of the alignment frame are slotted toreceive the spindles of rolls or bars 24. (Figure'?) which lie by gravity adjacent the pin bearing rolls, and are grooved as at 25 to clear the pins. These gravity rolls maintain the paper on the pins without pressure against it.

The alignment frame is shown as mounted by clamping bolts 26 on extensions 27 from the sides 2 of the typewriter and bed supporting plates and should preferably be P in a slanting position or at least not in a horizontal position, so that the various webs of paper are substantially free of any contact with each other, or at least free of frictional engagement with each other.

Upon passing over the pin bearing rolls in the frame now described, the various webs of paper are brought into alignment laterally because the pin bearing bodies are so arranged that the pin wheel portions are in true alignment and since the holes in the various webs are in alignment also, the paper will be jogged or freely impelled toward a uniform and constant alignment. Instead of v a roll having-pins at its ends, we may employ in this aligning device a pintle 16 over which is mounted a rotatable idler sleeve 16 (Fig. 18), this sleeve having the pin bearing sprockets 16 thereon adjustably held by set screws. In order to support the paper webs any desired number of collars or drums 16 may be mounted on the sleeve and suitably held in place thereon, said collars having a diameter equal to the diameter of the rotary bodies that carry the pins.

With this constructiom'the pin wheels may be adjusted along the sleeve to any desired spacing and the collars or drums moved ac-' cordingly, thereby enabling us to take care of a variety of widths of paper strips.

Without first describingO the-carbon paper mounting devices, it will e merely noted at this point that the carbon paper in our device is mounted along-side of the flatbed,

and brought in separate sheets across the 7 bed, transversely to the path of the paper and that the paper is inserted between the carbon sheets, and drawn along as the forms are completed and torn off, so that thecarbon paper remains in place except from time to time when the strips thereof are pulled across the bed to expose new surface.

In view of the fact that an assembly of say six to twelve paper webs to be written upon, and a like number of sheets less one of carbon paper may have to be dealt with on the platen or bed, it is evident that if there is any rubbing of the paper against the carbon sheets or any roughness around the marginal holes, or the like, that the carbon paper will be caught and pulled out of shape at its edge that opposes the paper movement resulting in loss of time, anomaking the machine impractical.

In fact it has been our experience that it is not webs 0 paper through an interlaced transverse body of carbon paper, and have the carbon paper edges exposed to the paper at its point of entrance into the interlaced arrangement.

. Accordingly at the rear end of the bed frame or typewriter support 2, we provide channel bars 28 (Figures 17 and 19), which side walls of the frame. Into these channels are dropped a series of rods 29 having expanded ends 30, which maintain the body of the rods in spaced relation.

A simple way of formmg the expanded ends is to drive small collars on the ends,

but any desired way-will sufiice.

Over the rods are secured a double fold of material, preferably paper as at 31, whlch engages the rod along the line of fold and thence extends forward over vthe .bed or platen in two plies. There will be enough rods for each sheet of carbon paper used, and the ends of the folds will overlie the sheets of carbon paper 32, thereby protectlng the edges of the paper.

practical. to pull a large number of rovide a vertical channel along the two Ill) The various printed webs may then be brought from the aligning frame, and thence inserted one sheet between each paper guard and drawn over the platen or bed of the machine. This operation is accomplished by drawing the paper films into position on the platen one at a time, setting a piece of carbon paper over each film and dropplng'in place a guard rod over each film, with the guard strips brought forward and set under and over the carbon paper. a

' Should it be desired to cut out the transfer of items in certain columns from certain of the multiple copies, the guard sheets will be extended as shown at 33 (Figure 17) so as to block ofl a portion of the carbon paper sheet which would otherwise effect a transfe r on the paper web lying beneath the particular guard in question.

While We mentioned the use of paper, and this because of its thin nature will probably be found preferable, we do not maintain that this is the only practical way of providing the fiat platen.

a guard for the carbon paper edge. Furthermore there may be many other ways apparent to the persons skilled in the art for guarding the exposed edge of carbon sheets in such an'assembly.

As shown in Figures 3, 4, 5, 8, 9,10, 11, the carbon paper is mounted on rolls at the side of the machine and then brought over Clamping devices. for the paper are employed at each side of the machine, which clamping devices are releasable automatically when the typewriter is moved out of writing position, and also are capable of a manual movement longitudinally of the bed, to break the sheets loose from the webs of paper should they adhere .thereto and permit their easy adjustment longitudinally of the Webs.

The rolls 34 of carbon paper are mounted in troughs or spaces 35 along the sides of the bed. Any usual type of spindle 36 is used, which is inserted through a hole in an end plate 37 and over which the carbon paper is placed. A disk 38 on the spindle is under control of a spring 39 around the spindle, and the tapered end 40 of the spindle is inserted in a notch in the block 41. The plate 37 and the block 41 are located adjacent the two ends of the fiat platen or bed.

A clamping device for the carbon paper is used at each side of the machine in the troughs 35. Mounted to slide on ledges 42 at the base at each side of the trough are frames having .side bars 43, 43 and endv bars 44. To one end of one of the end bars are secured springs 45, which engage over studs 46 on the end bar, and are held by across block, as for example, the block 41. A cross shaft 47 extending through the troughs and beneath the platen and equipped with a handle 48 is employed to slide these frames lengthwise of the platen. This is accomplished by means of U-shaped levers 49 on the shaft and studs 50 on the two side plates of the frames. The outer sliding plate may be held on its seat by removable pins 43 making the whole assembly readily demountable.

The carbon paper clamps-comprise two special plates 51 and 60. The plate 51 is slotted at 52, 52, to ride up and down on studs 53 in the inside plate .43. It has a right angle base flange 54 which is supported by means of suitable springs 55 on a special shelf 56 mounted onsaid inside frame plate 43 (Figures 3 and 8'). on the base flange 54 serve as retainers for the upper ends of the springs and like studs Small studs 57 v 58 do the same service for the shelf 56. Terminal slots 59 in the plate 51 may also be used for purposes of permanent attachment to the sliding frame side plate 43.

As held by thesprings the plate 51 will have its upper edge normally above the printing surface of the upper sheet of paper on the platen.

A second clamping plate between which and the plate 51 the carbon paper passes is shown at 60, which plate has unitary posts or rods 61 extending therefrom. Over these rods are fitted socket pieces 62, which house springs 63 that press on the ends of the posts. The socket pieces have tapered ends 64 which seat in notches cut in the outer slid-.

ing plate 43 of the longitudinally moving frame.

The plate seats at the lower end thereof on the base flange of the plate 51, and at its upper end is provided with a hinged plate 65, which is spring-pressed by means of springs 66, lying between the lugs 67 on the plate 60 and the fingers 68 on the hinged plate.

It will be understood that a like clamping device is mounted on both sides of the machine, and that thetcarbon paper passes between the plates 60 and 51 on each side of the lateral troughs bordering the flat bed or platen. The plate overlies the top most webs of paper on the bed and on y when depressed acts as a longitudinal clamp for the material on the bed so that in the ab-- sence of a positive forcing downwardly of the assembly the carbon paper will not be held tightly against the bed of the machine, but will be lifted up by means of the upper edge of the plate 51 toa position above the platen or bed.

The typewriter 3 which, as is the normal practice, is moved on its tracks entirely to one side of the platen or bed while paper is being changed, carries on its under side a set of rollers 69. As the typewriter is moved into writing position these rollers will contact with the plate 60 and force it downwardly thereby carrying down the carbon paper and stretching it tautly. At the same time the plate 65 will be depressed against the paper lying on the platen and will clanrp the paper down in place at the same time. The plate 65 is cut away soas not to interfere with the contact of the rollers with the plate 60 hinged.

The purpose of having the hinged plate 65 or some other resilient member to press down on the assembly of paper on the platen is that if the paper is quite'thick, the plate would be. likely to impede the action of the typewriter by pressing upwardly L on the rollers. When resilient, however, it will tip sufficiently to permit the passage of the typewriter, even though the assembly of paper is quite thick, thereby permitting the full depression of the carbon paper clamps as well as the use of the desired number of films of paper. For pressing down the paper firmly at the printing point, a spring carbon paper from each other.

While in this loose condition the handle 48 is rocked to and fro with the result of shifting all of the carbon paper and loosening up all adhesions'thereof to the webs. Unless this is done, the operator will have great difiiculty in pulling all of the webs together in a forward movement over the bed in order to tear them off and align and set fresh sections of the paper webs in position,

should the carbon paper be sticky as is often the case.

If it is desired to adjust the carbon paper lengthwise of the platen in order to expose fresh carbon paper to the printing action,

an adjusting screw or screws 70 (Figure 4) may be mounted in the end blocks of the troughs and set in different positions so as to co-operate with springs that bring the sliding frame to its normal position. in con: trolling that portion of the carbon paper that is exposed to the type impressions.

- Our experience has shown that it is necessary to renew the top sheets of carbon paper sooner than those below, and we have hence worked out a system of mounting the carbon paper whereby it is arranged so that the roll used for the upper sheets shall contain one or two plies, the roll for the next sheets having three or a larger number of plies,

and third roll, should one be required, hav-- ing the remaining necessary plies.

Thus in practice where ten webs of paper are used, the lower five sheets can be on the single carbon roll, the middle three sheets on a single roll and the top two sheets on a single roll. In renewing the paper a fresh portion of the smaller roll is pulled off, say, three times, to two times for the middle roll and one time for the larger roll. This gives us great economy in carbon paper and yet admits of the use of a, plurality of plies of carbon paper on a single roll, reducing the requisite size of the carbon paper storage space. v 1.

To renew the sheets the plates 60 are lifted the old torn off, and the plates 60 dropped again into place. This can be'done without disturbingth webs of paper on the bed of the machine, and avoidsthe tedious work of separating and then collating the sheets each time the carbon paper is changed.

Referring now to Figures 12-16 of the drawings, the devices at the operators end of the machine will be described. It is to be noted of these devices, that they provide for the longitudinal alignment of the various paper webs and the clamping them down to preserve this alignment while being written upon, and for tearing ofii'of the used webs.

It should be noted also that if the sheets 'when they arrive at the operators end of the machine are not aligned laterally, it will be impossible Without an almost complete col- "lating of the various-webs to employ the holes 19 in the webs for longitudinal alignment.

All of the webs of paper pass under a tearing off knife or bar 71, which is hinged at one end at 72 on the frame of the platen or bed,

.and is held clamped down at theother end by means of a spring hook 73. The bar may be readily swung out of the way in order to gain access to the other parts of the machine below it, and to collate the sheets should this be required.

A spring plate 74 is mounted beneath the platen of the machine, with its forward end pressed upwardly by its inherent springiness. Sliding beneath this plate is a threesided frame 75, which has screws or lugs thereon to engage the slots 76 in the said plate. At the forward end of-the side arms of the frame 75 are mounted two pins 77,

which extend upwardly, and pass through slots 78 in the tearing off-bar when in normal position under th "influence of the spring plate. [The pins extend downwardly also and are coupled together by a cross rod 79, which may be said to complete the three-sided frame 75. A spring finger 80 mounted beneath the sliding frame and on the spring plate serves to engage the cross rod between the pins and hold them in a retracted position.

the tearing ofi:' knife or elsewhere if desired,

are used to clamp the paper in place. These clamps have posts 82 extending down through a' frame of the bed, and springs 83 of considerable power press against the heads 84 of these posts and keep the clamps in operative position. A cross shaft 85 having a handle 86 is used to elevate the clamps,

when desired by means of cams or eccentrics 87 mounted on the shaft and adapted to con- I tact with the heads of said posts. 7 out .of place, fresh paper drawn off the rolls,

As so. constructed the operation is as follows :-The paper when first setup is brought forward-over the bed, the carbon paper inserted between the sheets, and then clamped at both sides, and the sheets aligned longitudinally by hand enough to bring the holes 19 therein into-a fair registry.

The operator then lowers the tearing off bar, sets the holes over the pins with the pins through the slots in the bar and grasping the cross rod between them works the ,so that they are of uniform width;

pins back and forth, thereby jogging the various webs into line. The pins being considerably smaller than the holes will readily do this. 1

The webs are loose clear back to the original rolls during this operation and without tearing out the holes, the pins will serve to bring them all into alignment, thereby aligning absolutely the printed matter on the various multiple webs. It should be understood that this is not a mere pulling of the webs through a short path, which might'or might not sufiice under specially favorable circumstances, but is a jogging back and forth of loose paper, our whole mechanism being designed for this purpose.

With th aligning pins in their forward position the operator then lets down the clamping fingers, and moves the typewriter into place thereby clamping down the carbon paper and the paper webs along the sides of the machine.

When the writing operation is over. the typewriter is moved away from the bed, thereby loosening the carbon paper, and the forward clamps are manually released by the operation of the handle 86. The carbon paper is then jogged free of adhesion and the pins removed from the paper by forcing the cross rod betweenthem downwardly and rearwardly to bring the pins below the paper and out of alignment with the holes, in which position the cross bar will be retained by the spring hook. The pa er is then drawn ofi, by grasping it in the and where it extends :under the tearing off bar, and tearing 1t off against said bar. It should be noted of Figures 13, 14.- and'15 that if paper were present the aligning pins would be in a lower position because of being blocked off the paper and it should also be noted that when the operator has drawn off a set of forms the next set will be drawn up far enough for the pins to move up into the holes 19 thereof which will stop the operator and guide him in pulling out a proper length form.

Our experience has been that, in the formation of a plurality of webs or films of pa per for use in a machine of the above described character, it is impossible or at least impractical to shear the webs at the edges The variation, even in careful press work is so great as t render manifolding very inaccurate, and so that any device employing the lateral edges of the webs for alignment will really do more harm than good. Our means for aligning the webs laterally by means of holes punctured in perfect alignment and spacing with regard to the printing on the forms, is thus an essential feature ofvour machine and is applicable to a Wide variety of uses in other paper feeding machines or of films of paper drawn by hand from stor age rolls or the like to jog them back and forth a plurality of times while they are held loosely, so that the jogging can take effect and perfect alignment be produced. This loose holding is, of course, most necessary at all points where the webs are drawn through a bending path.

It is believed that the various steps of operation have been now noted and a set of exemplary devices for accomplishing them pointed out. We do not assert the absolute essentiality of the complete assembly of operative parts and by no means desire to confine ourselves to the specific mechanisms described, but on the contrary desire our claims to be construed with the full application of the doctrine of equivalents wherever their language so permits.

Having thus described our invention What we claim as new and desire to secure by LettersPatent, is

1. In a multi-copy machine a storage rack for paper rolls comprising a pair of vertical members, roll spindle engaging means interspaced on both sides of said vertical members, and a latching means adapted to engage and hold a plurality of spindles in'the spindle engaging means on one of said vertical members, said latching means being operable as a unit.

2. In a multi-copy machine, a storage rack for paper rolls comprising a pair of vertical members, cross arms spaced alike along each of the vertical members, one set of cross arms having holes at each side of their vertical member, and the other set of cross armshavother, there being one, pin wheel or more for each strip and-a ngitudinal aligning means aligning means for the purpose described comprising idler rotary pin bearing bodies adapted to engage marginal holes in the said strips and a longitudinal aligning means also adapted toengage holes in the paper at a subsequent point in its path in the machine.

5. In a multi-copy machine a lateral aligning means for the purpose described comprising a series of shafts, one shaft for each paper strip to be aligned, and one or more idler rotary pin bearing bodies for each shaft adapted to engage successive marginal holes in one of said paper strips, said pin bearing bodies being arranged in line longitudinally of the path of the strips and a longitudinal aligning means also adapted to engage holes in the paper at a subsequent point in its path in the machine. 6. In a multi-copy machine a lateral alignmg means for the purpose described, comprising a series of shafts, one shaft for each paper strip to be aligned, and one or more idler rotary pin bearing bodies for each shaft adapted to engage successive marginal holes in one of said paper strips, said pin bearing bodies being arranged in line lon itudinally of the path of the stri s, said shaf ts being so arranged in different orizontal planes that the individual strips of paper may be drawn without contact with each other to an assembly point for multiple writing and a longitudinal aligning means also adapted to engage holes in the paper at a subsequent point in its path in the machine.

7. In a machine of the character described a lateral aligning means for the purpose described comprising a series of shafts, one shaft for each individual paper strip to be aligned, and a pair of rotary idler bearing bodies on-each shaft, said bodies being arranged in alignment with each other longitudinall of the path of the strips and a longitu inal aligning means also adapted to engage holes in the-paper at a subsequent point in its path in the machine. I

8. In a multi-copy machine, a lateral aligning means for the purpose described comprisingidler rotary pin bearing bodies adapted to engage marginal holes in the said strips, and means loosely engaging the strips and retaining them down on the pin bearing bodies.

9. In a multi-copy machine a lateral alignin means for duplicate paper strips adapte to co-operate-with a series of holes marginally arranged on the said strips in like relation to the printing thereon, comprising a series of independent rotary idler pin wheel members adapted to engage said holes and positioned alike with relation to each other, there being at least one pin wheel for each strip, and means loosely engaging the strips and retaining them down on the.

pin bearingbodies and a longitudinal aligning means also adapted to engage holes in the paper at a subsequent point in its path in the machine.

10. In, amachine of the character described a lateral aligning means for the purpose described comprising a,series of shafts, one shaft for each individual paper strip to be aligned, and a 'pair of rotary idler bearing bodies on each shaft, said bodies being arranged in alignment with each other longitudinally of the path of the strips, said pin bearing bodies being adjustable along the shafts to take care of different widths of paper anda longitudinal aligning means also adapted to engage. holes in the paper at a subsequent point in its path in the "machine.

11. In a machine of the character described a lateral aligning means for the purpose described comprising a series of shafts, one shaft for each individual paper strip to be aligned, and a pair of rotary idler bearing bodies on each shaft, said bodies being arranged in alignment with each other longitudinally of the path of the strips, said pin bearing bodies being adjustable along the shafts to take care of different widths of paper, and means adjustable on the shafts for supporting the )aper strips intermediate the pin bearing bodies.

12. In a lateral aligning device for the purpose described the combination of a frame, a series of shafts setin said frame at least one rotary pin bearing body mounted on each shaft and adapted to turn idly while engagin marginal perforations in paper strips, there being one shaft for each'paper strip, and a series of bars or the like adapted to be mounted in said rack and grooved to provide clearance for the pin bearing bodies and held in position to loosely engage the paper on said pin bearing bodies.

13. In a multi-copy machine, the combination with independent mounting means for a series of rolls of paper strips, a platen upon which the va-riousstrips are assembled,

and held stationary and multiple copies made thereon while so held, and mechanical means for aligning the strips laterally located between the roll mounting means and the platen.

14. In a multi-copy machine, the combination with independent mounting means for a series of rolls of paper strips, a platen upon which the various strips are assembled and held stationary and multiple copies made thereon While so held, and mechanical means for aligning the strips laterally located between the ro.'l mounting means and the platen, .said means being adapted to engage a portion of the strips within the edge thereof.

15. An idler lateral aligning device for a plurality of strips of paper, said device being adapted to engage means located within the' edges of the strips of paper and a longitudinal aligning means also adapted to engage holes in the paper at a subsequent point in its path in the machine.

16. An idler lateral aligning device for a plurality of strips of paper, said device being adapted to engage means located within the edges of the strips of paper, and comprising a series of elements, one element for each strip of paper and a longitudinal aligning means also adapted to engage holes in the paper at a subsequent point in its path in the machine.

17. The combination in a multi-copy machine of means for'supplying continuous webs of paper to be interlaced with transversely extending webs of a transferring medium, of means adapted to lie on both sides ofthe said web between which said webs of paper pass prior to being brought into contact with said transversely extending webs, said means being adapted to extend over both of the edges of said transversely extending Webs, for the purpose describe 18. The combination in a multi-copy machine of means for supplying continuous webs of paper to a printing point, means for I mounting transversely extending interlaced pieces of carbon paper between the webs of paper, and means adapted to lie on both sides of the said web of paper and extending over both of the edges of said transversely extending webs of carbon paper, for the purpose described. r

19. The combination in a multi-copy machine of means for supplying continuous webs of paper, means for mounting transversely extending interlaced carbon paper strips for said paper and a series of elements also lying between said webs of paper and having ends adapted to extend in the direction of the web paper movement, and lying on both sides of the meeting edge of the carbon paper strips so as to prevent contact of all webs of paper with any edge portion of carbon paper. I

{20. The combination in a multi-copy machine of means for guarding the'edges of interlaced carbon paper. from distortion by the movement of multiple webs of paper therebetween, comprising a series of bars set between the paper webs. and elements extending from said bars and lapping over both sides of said carbon paper edges, so as to prevent contact of all webs of paper with any edge portion of carbon paper.

21. The combination in a multi-copy machine of means for guarding the edges of interlaced carbon paper from distortion by themovement of multiple webs of paper therebetween, comprising a series of bars set betweenthe paper webs, and elements extending from said bars and lapping over both sides of said carbon paper edges, said elements comprising double pieces of flexible material secured to said bars and supported between said webs of paper.

22. In a fiat bed Inulti-copy machine, the

combination with a platen, a typewriter adapted to move across said platen and strike downwardlywith its type against the platen, of means on the typewriter for maintaining a compact condition of multiple webs of the desired print receiving medium beneath the type, comprising a resilient element beneath the typewriter located to press downwardly on the paper closely adjacent the printing point.

23. In a fiat bed multi-copy machine, the combination with a platen, a typewriter adapted to move across said platen and strike downwardly with its type against the platen, of means on the typewriter for main-- 24. In a flat bed multi-copy machine, the

combination with a platen, a writing machine movable over the platen, means for retaining carbon paper at both sides of the platen, said means being adapted to retain the carbon paper spaced above from the surface of the platen when the writing ma.- chine is removedtherefrom.

- 25. In a flat bed multi-copy machine, the combination with a platen, a writing machine movable over the platen, means for retaining carbon paper at both sides of the platen, said means being adapted to retain the carbon "paper spaced above the platen surface when the writing machine is removed therefrom and said means being shiftable with relation to the platen so as to loosen adhesions ofsaid carbon paper. I 26. In a fiat bed multi-copy machine, the combination with a platen. a writing machine movable over the platen, means for re- 'taining carbon paper at both sides of the chine movable over the platen, means or retaining carbon paper at both sides of the platen, said means being adapted to retain the carbon paper above the platen surface when the writing machine is removed therefrom, and comprising longitudinally extending members pressed together, and spring pressed above the surface of the platen, said writing machine having a contact member adapted to depress said longitudinally extending members to a position to hold the carbon paper tightly down against the bed.

28. A carbon paper arrangement for fiat i bed multi-copy machines comprising in part a trough element, a plate mounted at one side of the trough element adjacent the bed,

and a second plate having means for engaging resiliently the othe side of the trough element to retain it in c amping contact with means for engaging resiliently the other one of the sliding members to retain said other plate clamping contact with the first plate.

30. A carbon paper arrangement for fiat copy machines employing continuous webs bed multi-copy machines comprising in part a pair of members slidable longitudinally of the bed, a plate mounted on one of said sliding members, and another plate having means for engaging resiliently the other one of the sliding members to retain said other plate in clamping contact with the first plate, and means for moving said sliding members along the bed simultaneously.

31. A carbon paper arrangement for flat bed multi-cop machines comprising in part anelement a apted to be moved longitudinally of the bed, and means carried by the said element and adapted to clamp carbon paper for use on the said bed.

32. A carbon paper arrangementfor flat bed multi-copy machines comprising in part a trough element, a plate mounted at one side of the trough element adj acentjthe bed, and a second plate having means for engaging resiliently the other side of the trough element to retain it in clamping contact with the first plate, resilient means for support- "ing the plate adjacent the bed in such position as to retain its upper edge above the surface of the bed.

33. A carbon paper arrangement for multi-copy mac hines comprising side supports, a plate on one of said side supports and another plate having posts thereon, and spri g housings adapted to slide over said post and means in the other side support for removably engaging said spring hous-.

ings.

34. Ina flat bed multi-eopy machine, the combination with a platen, and means for clamping carbon paper for use over the nally and platen comprising relatively fixed plate, and a removable plate, said removable plate having spring means thereon and means for removably supporting the spring means in a position for it to force the removable plate against the relatively fixed plate.'

35. An aligning mechanism for multicopy machines employing continuous webs of paper, comprising pin means for engaging holes in the paper, and means for moving said pins back and forth in a path longitudinal of the continuous strips, said means being limited in movement to a path insufficient to feed a section of paper through the machine.

36. The combination in a flat bed multiple copy machine of means for supplying continuous multiple webs of paper thereto, means for loosely retaining webs of paper over the machine bed, said paper having uniformly located holes therein, pin means for engaging the holes, and meansfor mounting the pin means adapted to permit a limited movementthereof back and forth longitudinally of the machine bed, said movement being insufiicient to feed a section of paper through the machine.

37-.- An aligning mechanism for multiof paper forms, comprising pin means for engaging terminal holes in the forms, and means for moving said pins in a'limited path back and forth longitudinally of the path of the paper.

38. Ina multi-copy machine adapted for use with continuous webs of paper forms having uniform marking thereon andc-hav- I ing uniformly located holes both longitudinally and laterally thereof, of pin means for engaging the lateral and longitudinal holes for aligning said webs prior to forming copies thereon.

. 39. In a multi-copy machine adapted for use with continuous webs of paper forms having uniform' marking thereon and having uniformly located holes both longitudinally and laterally thereof, of means for loosely retaining the webs. in the machine, and pin means for engaging the lateral and longitudinal holes, for the purpose described.

40. In a multi-copy machine adapted for use with continuous webs. of paper forms having uniform marking thereon and hav= ing uniformly-located holes both longitudl; laterally thereof, of means for loosely retaining the webs in the mach ne, pin means for engaging the longltudinal holes for effecting ateral alignment of the webs, and additional pin-means located to act upon the webs after being laterally. aligned and adapted for engagement with the lateral holes to align the webs longitudinally.

In a multi-copy machine adapted for use with continuous webs of paper forms having marginal holes and transverse holes, of rotary pin idlers to engage the marginal holes, and positively movable pin means adapted to engage the transverse holes, in the webs after same have been laterally aligned, in order to longitudinally align them.

42; In a multi-copy machine, the combination with means for storing continuous multiple webs of paper, means for laterally aligning said webs before reaching the printing bed, a printing'bed, and pin means located beyond the bed and adapted to engage holes formed uniformly in the various webs to longitudinally align them.

43. In a multi-copy machine, meansfor storing continuous websof paper, means for laterally aligning the Webs, means for retaining the Webs loosely over a platen, means for loosely retaining carbon paper between the webs over said platen, and pin means adapted for positive reciprocatory movement longitudinal of the platen and adapted to engage holes perforated in the webs of paper for jogging the said webs into alignment during said loose retaining thereof.

44. In a multi-copy machine, means for storing continuous webs of paper, means for laterally aligning the webs, means for retaining the webs loosely over a platen, means for loosely retaining carbon paper between the webs over said platen, and pin means adapted for positive reciprocatory movement longitudinal of the platen and adapted to engage holes perforated in the webs of paper for jogging the said webs into alignment during said loose retaining there of, and means for clamping tightly to the platen both the continuous Webs and the carbon paper, during printing action on the paper.

45. An aligning means for multiple webs of paper over the fiat bed of a manitolding machine comprising a plurality of pins, means for mountin said pins for reciprocatory movement, sa d pins being adapted to engage a plurality-of transversely arranged holes formed in the paper webs transversely of the webs, and means for guiding and limiting the said movement of the pins.

46. An aligning means for multiple webs of paper over the flat bed of a manifolding machine comprising a plurality of pins,

means for mounting said pins for reciprocatory movement, said pins being adapted to engage a plurality of transversely arranged holes formed in the paper webs transversely of the Webs, and means for guiding and limiting thesaid movement of the pins, comprisinga tear ofi' bar arranged to straddle ,the paper and slotted to receive the pins.

47. In'a multi-copy machine, the combination with a storage means for continuous webs of paper, a lateral aligning means for the Webs, means for mounting carbon paper transverse of the webs, means for guarding the rearward edges of the carbon paper from contact with the webs of paper, and longitudinal aligning means tor-the paper.

48. In a mult-i-copy machine, the combination with a storage means for continuous webs of paper, a lateral aligning means for the webs, means for mounting carbon paper transverse of the Webs, means for guarding the rearward edges of the carbon paper from contact with the webs of: paper, and longitudinal aligning means for the paper, both of said aligning means comprising pin bearing bodies adapted to engage in holes formed uniformly in the paper.

49. In a multi-copy machine, the combination with a storage means for continuous Webs of paper, a lateral aligning means for the webs, means for mounting carbon paper transverse of the webs, means for guarding the rearward edges of the carbon paper from contact with the Webs of paper, and longitudinal aligning means for the paper, both of said aligning means comprising pin bearing bodies adapted to engage in holes formed uniformly in the paper, the lateral aligning means being idle and adapted to operate upon pulling the Webs thereover and the longitudinal aligning means being positively operable.

50. In a multi-copy machine, the combination with a storage means for continuous webs of paper, a lateral aligning means for the webs, means for mounting carbon paper transverse of the webs, means for guarding the rearward edges of, the carbon paper from contact with the webs of paper, and longitudinal aligning means for the paper, said storing means, and lateral aligning being adapted to individually engaging each Web of paper, and maintainin each Web separate from the others, both 0 said aligning means comprising pin bearing bodies adapted to engage in holes formed uniformly inthe paper.

51. An aligning means for a plurality of webs of uniformly printed paper, comprising a spring element, a sliding element on the spring element, pins on the sliding element, an element to hold the webs of paper with holes therein loosely over the pins and means for engaging the sliding element to move it to and fro in a line longitudinal of the paper webs.

52. An aligning means for a plurality of webs of uniformly printed paper. comprising a spring element, a sliding element on the spring element, pins on the sliding element, an element to hold the Webs of paper with holes therein loosely over the pins and means for enga ing the. sliding element to move it to and i ro in a line longitudinal of means the paper webs and means for positively engaging the paper adjacent the pins, said means being releasable.

53. In a multi-copytmachine, means for supplying continuous webs of paper, a support upon which multiple copies are to be made, means between the supplying means and the support for laterally aligning the forms and means beyond the support for longitudinally aligning them.

54. In a multi-copy machine, means for supplying continuous webs of paper, a support upon which multiple copies are to be made, and idler pinbearing rotary means located between the supplying means and the support adapted for engagement with successive holes in the webs for lateral alignment of the webs.

55. In a multi-copy machine, means for loosely retaining a suppl of continuous webs of paper, means for oosely and individually alignin said webs laterally, means for supporting tfie webs for making multiple copies thereof, and means for loosely engaging uniformly arranged holes in the webs for ali ning them longitudinally.

56. n a multi-copy machine, means for loosely retaining a suppl of continuous webs of paper, means for oosely and individually alignin said webs laterally, means for supportin t e webs for making multiple .copies thereo and means for loosely engaging uniformly arranged holes in the webs for aligning them longitudinally, said means for aligning the webs laterally comprising idler pin bearing rotary "bodies, adapted to engage holes formed uniformly in the various webs.

57. In a multi-copy machine, means for loosely retaining a supply of continuous .webs of paper, means for loosely and individually alignin said webs laterally, means for sup ortin t e webs for making multiple -copies t ereo and means for loosely engaging uniformly arranged holes in the webs for aligning them longitudinally, said means for ali ing thewebs laterally comprising idler pin bearing rotary bodies, adap ted to engage holesiformed uniformly in the various webs, said idlers being set out of line with the means for supporting the webs,-

, whereby they are frictionally free. in their movement therefrom to the said support.

58. In a fiat bed multi-copy machine, the

I combination with a platen, a writing machine movable over the platen, means for retaining carbon paper at both sides of the Y platen, said means being adapted to retain the carbon paper spaced above the platen surface when the writing machine is removed therefrom, and to bind it down tight- 1y against the platen when the writing machine is in writing position.

59. The combination in a multi-copy machine of means for supplying continuous webs of paper to be interlaced with transversely extending webs of a transferring medium, of web-like means between which said webs of paper pass prior to being brought into contact with said transversely extending webs, said means being adapted to extend over the edges of said transversely extending webs, and thence along the under surface of the transferring medium to a point beneath the printing surface of the continuous webs to block ofl a transfer at selected points.

60. The combination in a multi-copy machine of means for supplying continuous Webs of paper to a printing point, means for mounting transversely extending interlaced pieces of carbon paper'between the webs of paper, and web-like means lying between the webs of paper and extending over the edges of said transversely extending Webs of carbon paper, and thence along the under-surface of the carbon paper to the desired degree to a point beneath the printing surface of the continuous Webs to block off a transfer at selected points.

61. The combination in a multi-copy machine of means for supplying continuous webs of paper, means for mounting transversely extending interlaced carbon paper strips for said paper and a series of weblike elements also lying between saidwebs of paper and free at the side edges and having ends adapted to extend in the direction of the Web paper movement, and thence along the under surface of the carbon paper strips to the desired degree for blocking ofi' transference from the desired portions of underlying paper webs.

62. The combmation 1n a multi-copy ma therebetween, comprising a series of bars set between the paper. webs, and elements extending from said bars and lapping over both sides of said carbon paper edges, said elements extending thence along the surface of the carbonpaper to a point beneath the printing point of the machine, and said elements comprising double pieces of flexible material secured to said bars and supported between said webs ofpaper.

- 63. The combination in a multi-copy machine of means for guarding the edges of interlaced carbon paper, from distortion by the movement of multiple webs of paper therebetween, comprising a series of bars set between the paper webs, and elements extending from said bars and lapping over both sides of said carbon paper edges, said elements comprising double pieces of paper secured over the bars and supported between said Webs of paper, with the outer edges of the pieces cut with the desired extensions to block off carbon paper transference to the desired degree.

64. In a multi-copy machine adapted for use with continuous Webs of paper forms having uniform marking thereon and having uniformly located holes both longitudinally and laterally thereof, of pin means for engaging the lateral and longitudinal holes for aligning said Webs prior to forming copies thereon, said holes being larger than the pins.

65. In a multi-copy machine adapted for use with continuous webs of paper forms having uniform marking thereon and having uniformly located holes both longitudinally and laterally thereof, of means for loosely retaining the webs in the machine,

, and pin means for ldosely engaging the lateral and longitudinal holes, for the purpose described.

66. In a multi-copy machine adapted for use with continuous webs of paper forms having uniform marking thereon and having uniformly located holes both longitudinally and laterally thereof, of means for loosely retaining the webs in the machine, pin means for loosely engaging the longitudinal holes for effecting lateral alignment of the webs, and additional pin means located to act upon the webs after being laterally aligned and adapted for loose engagement with the lateral holes to align the Webs longitudinally. '7

67. In a multi-copy machine in which a plurality of webs of paper are to be manually grasped, and pulled through the machine, aligning means for longitudinal alignment comprising a pin bearing means having a pin or pins to engage holes in the paper, said means being mounted so as to permit of repeated movement to and fro in a path longitudinal of the paper, but of less length than would accomplish a feeding of the paper.

68. In a multi -copy machine in which a plurality of Webs of paper are to be manually grasped, pulled through the machine, and aligning means for longitudinal alignment comprising a pin bearing means having a pin or pins to engage holes in the paper, said means being mounted so as to permit of repeated movement to and fro in a path longitudinal of the paper and a lateral aligning means comprising idler pin heating bodies adapted to engage holes in the paper whereby the holes for the first mentioned pin bearing means will be capable of use without repeated collation of the paper web.

JOHN Q. SHERMAN. ALBERT W. METZNER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2781721 *Jun 4, 1954Feb 19, 1957Dunn Joseph APrinting and segregating machine
US5051013 *Aug 24, 1989Sep 24, 1991Song Albert CMasking film
Classifications
U.S. Classification400/42, 400/621, 400/512, 400/616.3, 400/498
International ClassificationB41J15/18, B41J15/20
Cooperative ClassificationB41J15/20
European ClassificationB41J15/20