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Publication numberUS1454837 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 8, 1923
Filing dateJul 17, 1919
Priority dateJul 17, 1919
Publication numberUS 1454837 A, US 1454837A, US-A-1454837, US1454837 A, US1454837A
InventorsSmith Burgess W
Original AssigneeTodd Protectograph Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Safety paper and method of making same
US 1454837 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

B. W. SMITH I SAFETY PAPER AND METHOD OF MAKING SAQIE May 8, 1923.

Filed July 17, 1919 Hg EE- VOID \mm l/VI/E/VTOR BURGESS W, SMITH A 1mm x Patented May 8, 1923.

ourrao STATES 1,454,837 r ce.

B URGESS W. SMITH, OF ROCHESTER, NEW YORK, ASSIGNOR T TODD PROTECTOGRARE COMPANY, OF ROCHESTER, NEW YORK, A CORPORATION OF NEW YORK.

SAFETY PAPER AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME.

Application filed July 17, 1919. Serial No. 311,673.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, BURGESS W. SMITH,

a citizen of the United States. residing at is, of course, illustrative only.

users by-betraying in some way any at-- tempts to make fraudulent alterations in matter written, printed or otherwise indicated on the paper. Y

A broad object of the invention is to provide an improved method of making safety paper and an improved paper which will yield a high degree of protectionat a relatively low manufacturing cost. Another ob1ect is to provide a safety paper which wil be so afiectedby attempts to make.

erasures as to disclose words, symbols or other indic-ia showing that, theinstrument has been tampered with. In'this application the word Void is employed, but this Any other word or form o f'indicia may be used according to .preference or the purpose to be served.

Still other objects will appear in connec tion with the following detailed description in which reference is made to the accompanyin drawing illustrating' 'one embodiment of the idea.

In said drawing: I

Fig. 1 represents the warning or-nullifying word used for illustration, with the letters thereof at one an le and 2 shows the same Word with its ,etters inclined at a V difi'erent angle.

Fig. 3 shows hows'vords such 'as shown in Figs. 1 and 2 may be superimposedto give an arbitrary design, how other matter may be added-to complicate the design and howthe nullifying or warning indlcia will be exposed if an erasure is attempted.

Stated in a eneral way, the invention comprises marking in a relatively indelible manner upon the paper or printing thereon in permanent ink matter which when visible or standing alone tends to nullify aninstrument or warn against acceptance, and matter camouflaging, masking or obliterating the outlines of the permanent matter so as to render the latter indistinguishable or invisible. The accompanying matter maybe of-any desired form or color and may be 'applied in ink which is deleble or erasable in the sense that it will be removed by attempts to erase an inscription on the paper either, by abrasion .or by using whatare popularly known as ink eradicators, or by both methods of erasure, and it is preferred to use an ink which is readily removed by both methods of erasure. .In this description and in the claims therefor, the terms erasable? and deleble are employed' as referring to inks and like materials and methods of applying the same to the paper having either or both proper ties.. A I

The acc'om panyin matter may for example cooperate. wit the permanent matter to form a conventional or arbitrary de sign in which the-permanent matter is indistinguishable. or to make permanently printed'words look like other words, or the permanent matter may be printed on a paper having a'white or colored, background and then overprintedinan erasable ink or I I paste of the same color as the background to obliterate the permanent printing or render it invisible. The permanent orindelible.

' matter may obviously be applied as a watermark, or in-ink which is normally substantially invisible and adapted to have its color deepened by reaction with bleaching chemicals commonly employed in the socalled ink eradicators, as well-understood in the art. '1 Any way of preparing the paper, whereby there is marked or printed on it in a relatively indelible or permanent manner warning or nullifying indicia with accompanying matterremova-ble by attempted erasures so as to expose or render the permanent matter effective, is considered to be within the scope of-the invention. Paper prepared iii the ways suggested willbe ailected by erasures to stripoff the camouflaging, confusing or obliterating matter, thereby baring or disclosing the'permanent matter in recognizable out line and. rendering it effective to nullify the instrument or at least Warn, against acceptance. The permanent matter isexemplified in the followingdetailed description by the word Void but as alread stated any other symbol, sign or form- 0 indicia may be employed which is capable of inherently conveying or signifying a warning, as. for example, the representation of a semaphore, or a flag or other warning sign.

In the accompanying drawing, there is illustrated a way in which the invention can be practiced to prepare paper so as to give the appearance of an all-over design, with parts of the design removable by attempts at erasure to expose the nullifying word Void. The difi'erent letters and lines comprisin such a design may beapplied in any desired relations and in any desired sequence, although the best results will be obtained by first printing the nullifying word or its equivalent in permanent ink and then overpr nting, by one or more operations, the erasable matter intended to complete the design and, at the same time, render the permanent matter indistinguishable or unrecogniaable.

To produce a paper in the manner illustrated in the drawing, the nullifying word Void,'with its letters arranged as shown in Fig. 1, is first printed on the surface of the .paper either so it will fall on that part of the instrument which it is intended to protect or the word may be repeated in spaced relation all over the paper. 4 The latter is preferable, as it is easier to apply other black impression,

ink eradicators have no afmatter to give the effect or appearance of an all-over design such as is in common use in making safety papers and all parts of the paper are protected. This nullifying' word is printed in a permanent ink such as a carbon ink in a hard-drying varnish vehicle. 'Such ink gives a clearly defined is highly resistant to abrasion, and fect upon it. Well known inks of other colors and having the same resistant qualities ma be employed if desired.

Tl he word Void, with its letters arranged as illustrated inw Fig. 2, may then be printed in superimposed relation upon the permanent printing, the second impression being made in an ink which is preferably of the same color as the permanent ink, but which is deleble or erasable. If the carbonpermanent ink is used, a good deleble ink to match it may be made by employing a ni rosine black lake ina water soluble vehic e such as gum arabic' and .glycerin. Such an ink is soft-drying, so that it will be easily removable by abrasion and it is also removed by' the action of ink eradicators. As shown in Fig. 3, the superimposed relation of the two printed words and the different angles of inclination of the letters give the eifect of an arbitrary design in which the identity of thepermanently printed word is concealed.

As so far described, the product would be very satisfactory, as the superimposed impressions may be applied in various relatlons to give variousv pattern efi'ects. 'llhere may, however, also be employed additional matter of the same or other colors and in any desired form or appearance to complicate, and complete various designs desired. In Fig. 3 of the drawing, this additional matter is arbitrarily represented by parallel horizontal lines. Such linesor other matter may be applied by one or more successive operations and with different inks according to the nature of the matter or the colors desired, but usually the additional matter may be applied by means of the same ink as the erasable matter represented by the word Void.illustrated in Fig. 2. If the same ink is used, all of the matter to camouflage or confuse the outlines of the permanent matter may be applied by one overprinting operation.

If an attempt is made to erase-matter from paper treated as described, the matter in deleble ink will be removed as shown at A, Fig. 3, thereby disclosing or rendering distinguishable the nullifyi-ng or equivalent matter printed in the permanent ink. With such a warnin plainly visible, there is little danger that t e altered instrument will be accepted. After-erasure it is diflicult to replace the erased matter so as to restore the original appearance of the instrument. This is especially true when a camouflaging pattern is used such as described, as compare withthe use of a mere overprinting in solid color, the latterhaving the further disadvantage of tending to require too thick a coating.

While the foregoing discloses a highly satisfactory way of practicing the invention to produce a paper which will admirably fulfill the urpose intended, it is not the desire to be limited to any one way of practicing the invention or to any one form of resulting material, as both arecapable of numerous changes and modifications, all coming within the scope of'the claims which follow.

What is claimed is .1. A safety paper on which non-erasable ink matter which, i

is rinted in exposed,

would indicate attempts to give any instrumenta meaning different from that which it was originally intended to have, and matter masking the permanently printed matter, said masking matter being printed in erasable ink of the same color as the'non-erasable ink. Y

2. A safety paper on which is printed in non-erasable ink matter which standing alone would nullify an instrument, and matter printed in erasable ink of the same color as the permanent ink and arranged. in lines cooperating with'the permanent matter to form a conventional design normally renderin said nullifying matter inconspicuous.

3. g f safety paper having permanently printed thereon-reading matter which stan ing alone would nullify an instrument, and

having also a; camouflaging overprinting in erasable ink.

4. A safety paper on which is printed in non-erasable ink reading matter which, if

' standing'alone, would render an instrument void, and matter in deleble ink'comprising lines rendering the non-erasable matter 1ndistinguishable. I

5. A safety paper on which is permanently printed reading matter which, if readable, would nullify aninstrument, and mat-- ter' printed in erasable ink arranged in lines cooperating with the permanently printed matter to give the appearance of a conven-.

tional design.

6. A safety paper having an-all-ove'r design comprising a set of repetitions of the word Void and a set of superimposed repetitions of the same word, the letters of the words in one set being at an angle to the letters of the words of the other set and one set printed in non-erasable ink and the other in erasable ink.

7. A safety paper on which is" printed in non-erasable ink the word Void withits letters inclined in one direction, and a superimposed impression in erasable ink of the word Void with the letters thereof inclined in a different direction, the lines of the. two

impressions cooperating to form a conventional design. a

8. A safety paper on which is printed in non-erasable ink the word Void with its letters inclined in one direction, a superimposed impression of the word Void with the letters thereof inclined in a different direction, the two impressions cooperating to form an arbitrary design, and other overprinted matter tofurther complicate the des1 il A safety paper on which is printed in permanent ink reading matter which, if ex- 'posed, would nullify an instrument, and

having successively applied overprintings in lines designed to camouflage the permanent printing and in ink removable by abrasion or by ink eradicators.

10. The method of making safety paper which consists in printing on. the paper in permanent ink matter which standing alone would inherently nullify an instrument, and then overprintingin erasableink matter arranged in lines cooperating with the permanent matter to form. an, arbitrary design camouflaging saidnullifying matter.

11.- The method of making safety paper which consists in printing-successive superimposed impressions combining to form av conventional deslgn, one of the lmpressions being in permanent ink and having the form of inherently significant characters which posedrelation the word Void with the letters thereof inclined in the opposite direction, one ofsaid printings being inerasable ink and the other in non-erasable ink and "the lines of the two combining to form an arbitrary design.

14. The method of making'safety paper which consists in providing the paper in repetition over substantially its entire surface with relatively indelible markings adapted to inherently convey a warning and also with a relatively deleble marking masking said warning markings and adapted to be removed by an erasure made on saidv paper to expose said warning markings.

15. The method of making safety paper which consists in printingupon the .paper in relatively non-erasable ink and in repeti tion over the surface thereof, a. word inherently carrying a warning of alteration of the paper, and in printing over 'saidwarnmore patterns concealing said warning word until an erasure is made on the paper;

16. A safet paper provided with a rela-- tivelyindelib e marking adapted to inherently conve a warning, when visible, that the paper as been altered, and provided alsov with a relatively deleble marking adapted to conceal said indelible marking until removed by an erasure made on the paper.

17. A safety paper on which is printed in non-erasable ink, reading matter which, if readable, would indicate that the instrument has been altered, and a pattern printed in erasable ink and 00-0 erating-witli' the er- '95 ing word in relativelyerasable ink, one or- I manent matter to ren er the,la'tter illeglble.

18. The method of making safety paper which consistsin first printing on the paper in permanent ink reading matter which, if

readable, would indicate that the instrument has been tampered with, and then overprint--,

nent matter to render the latter illegible.

In testimony whereof I aflix my signature.

' BURGESS w. SMITH,

inga pattern co-operatingwith the perma i

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3055117 *Jan 11, 1960Sep 25, 1962Neville IncArticle and method for concealing a response or item of information
US3086300 *Apr 3, 1961Apr 23, 1963Gerhard T RuglandMultiple choice response device
US4092449 *Apr 16, 1976May 30, 1978Bernstein Donald JAlteration-sensitive imprinted article
US5364132 *Apr 9, 1993Nov 15, 1994S.J.A. TrustMethod for assembly and activation of a reusable security identification badge
US5602804 *Aug 3, 1995Feb 11, 1997Temtec IncLong term rapid color changing time indicator
Classifications
U.S. Classification283/96, 283/102, 427/7
International ClassificationB42D15/00
Cooperative ClassificationB42D15/0013
European ClassificationB42D15/00C