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Publication numberUS1461504 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 10, 1923
Filing dateJun 13, 1922
Priority dateJun 13, 1922
Publication numberUS 1461504 A, US 1461504A, US-A-1461504, US1461504 A, US1461504A
InventorsTanzi Guido
Original AssigneeTanzi Guido
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Macaroni die
US 1461504 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 10, 1923. 1,461,504

- G. TANZI MACARONI DIE Filed June 13, 1922 2 Sheeiis-Sheet 1 1 HH llllll Wmmm G. TANZI MACARONI DIE July 10, 1923.

Filq June 13, "1922 2 Sheets-Sheet? I Irwin/T01? W ATTORNEY Patepted July 10, 1923.

w STATES sumo TANZI, or LONG ISLAND CITY, NEW YORK.

MACABONI DIE.

' or turn.

I have found that macaroni produced in strips, spirally wound has many advantages. in that it will cook more uniformly and will not mass in cooking or serving, beside being more agreeable in appearance and more appetizing than flat or tubular macaronl.

Means have been employed 1n the past for twisting macaroni, but such means were mechanical to an extent that the amount of twist could not be controlled and the macaroni was caused to pass throughan. additional rotating guide plate. This adds complication to the machine and makes the production of short lengths impossible.

In my device, the twist is imparted by the construction of the die and may be a single, double orquadruple spiral and the cross-sectional outline of the finished product may have any one of a number of different shapes. v

In the specification which follows, I Wlll describe the construction of my die and the accompanying drawings should be referred to for a complete understanding of the specification which follows.

In the drawings Fig. 1, is a plan view of a die.

Fig. 2, a side elevation, partly in section.

Fig. 3, a reverse plan View.

Fig. 4, an elevation and section of the material produced in the die shown in Figs. 1 and 3.

Fig. 5, a fractional, top of different construction.

Fig. 6, a reverse plan view of the part shown in Fig. 5.

Fig. 7, is an elevation and section of the material produced by the die shown in Figs. 5 and 6.

-Fig. 8, is a fractional view of a die having four feeding apertures.

Fig. 9, is a reverse plan view of Fig. 8.

Fig. 10 is an elevation in section of product shown in Figs. 8 and 9.

plan view of a die Application filed June 13, 1922. Serial No. 567,997.

, '11, is a view similar to Fig. 5.

Flg. 12, 1s a reverse plan view of the die shown 1n Fig. 11, and

F1g. 13, is an elevation and sectional view of ghle2product of the die shown in Figs. 11 an Similar reference numerals indicate like parts in all the figures where they appear.

Because of the peculiar construction of my dle, I prefer that it should be made in two parts, an upper plate 15 and a lower plate or supporting member 16 and these members may be secured together by means of a screw 17 arranged at the mid center of the plates or in some other desirable manner.

In the upper plate 15, I produce a plurality of recesses as shown at 18 and 19. These recesses I may refer to asv feeding orifices, as the dough mass moving downward under pressure of the piston, not shown, will be recelved into these feeding orifices to be discharged from them through apertures in the sides of the orifices as shown at 20 and 21 and it will be noted that in the construction shown in Figs. 1 to 3 inclusive, the apertures 20 and 21 open toward each other.

To relieve the pressure whichwould aocumulate in the flat bottomed recess and to promote the discharge therefrom, I form a pro ect1on 22 or 23 in the bottom of each receiving recess:

In the plate 16, I roduce a plurality of discharge orifices as s own at 24 and 25 and as indicated in section at 26 in Fig. 2 and I call particular attention of the fact that the apertures through each pair of receiving orifices enter and are connected with a single discharge-orifice, that is each two receiving orifices feed one discharge orifice.

- While the shape of the apertures 20 or 21 may be varied at will, I desire that pairs of aperturesshould be angularly disposed to each other, so that when the ribbon of dough is discharged through the aperture it will tend to rotate.

In discharging into the orifices 26,. the ribbons of dough passing through the apertures 20 and 21 are brought together so that their edges touch andas the dough is plastic and adhesive the edges of the two projecting ribbons will adhere to each other and rotate together, thus producing a spiral as shown in Fig. 4.

In Fig. 5, three receiving orifices27, 28 and 29 discharge into one discharge orifice 30. The spiraLproduct 31 produced from the die, formed as shown will have three wings as shown in the sectional view a t 32.

In Figs. 8 and 9, the four receiving orifices, 33, 34, 35 and '36 feed one discharge.

orifice 37. This productwill be shaped as a spiral, but will have four wings as shown at i 38. In the die shown in Figs. lland 12, I may place an ordinary pin member 39 in the discharge passage of the orifice 40; so

that the product while turned in a spiral as shown at 41 will have a central hollow as indicated at 42 in Fig. 13. In this product we have all of the advantages of spirally turned and hollow macaroni and it will be understood that the forming pin may be provided in any other of the dies here shown and that dies of other shapes may be readily produced.

-While other modifications maybe made within the scope of the appended claims, I

' prefer the whole as shown and described.

- Having carefully and fully described my invention what I claim and desire to obtain 1s 1." A macaronidie comprising a plurality of plates secured together, one said plate beand an irregularly shaped passage connecting each pair of receiving orifices with its oo-acting discharge orifices.

, 2. A macaroni die comprising a plurality of plates secured together, .one said plate being provided with a plurality of dough receiving orifices arranged in pairs and the other said plate being rovided with a plurality of discharge orifices each v0t which communicates witha pair of receiving orifices, the receiving orifices having apetrures in their s1de walls said apertures being directed out of the radial line of said dis' charge orifices.

3. A macaroni die comprising a plurality of plates secured together, one said plate being provided with a plurality of receiving orifices arranged in pairs and the other said receiving orifices being provided with dischargeapertures in their nearest. adjacent sldes, sald discharge apertures being dirccted out'of the radial line of said discharge orifices, to impart a rotary motion to thematerial passing therethrough.

at. A macaroni die comprising a plurality of plates secured together, one said plate being provided with a plurality of receiving orifices arranged in pairs and the other said plate being provided with a plurality of discharge orifices each communicating with a pair ofcreceiving orifices and projections in the bottom of said receiving orifices to .direct the material passing.

5. A macaroni die comprising a'plurality of plates secured together, one said plate being provided with a plurality of receiving orifices and the" other said plate being rovided'with a plurality of discharge ori ces, each saiddischarge orifice communicating with a plurality of receiving orifices and each said receiving orifice being provided with a discharge aperture-in the wall there-' of, all said discharge apertures of each associated group commumcatmg w1th a single discharge' passage, arranged in the nearest adjacent side. of the plate, wherein the receiving orifices are produced.

6. A macaroni die comprising a plurality of plates secured together, one said plate being provided with a plurality of receiving orifices arranged in pairs and the other said plate being provided with a plurality of discharge orifices each communicating with a plurality of receiving'orifices,'- said receiving orifices being provided with discharge apertures in the sidewalls thereof, said apertures tending toward each other, though arranged at an angle to impart a rotary motion to the material passing therethrough, a pluralityof said discharge apertures communicating with each said'discharge orifices. i g c Signed at the city, county and State of ;New York, this 19th day of May, 1922.

GUIDO TANZI. I

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2583600 *Sep 23, 1948Jan 29, 1952Schreiber Hazle VFeed grinding and die expressing machine
US4452581 *Mar 29, 1982Jun 5, 1984Mary PanehalCooking utensil
US7008214Aug 29, 2003Mar 7, 2006Ibolya FaddiDumpling maker
US7637732 *Jan 3, 2008Dec 29, 2009Good Earth Tools, Inc.Die for extruding material
US8852662 *Oct 24, 2011Oct 7, 2014Johnson Industries InternationalString cheese cutting system
US20110091594 *Dec 27, 2010Apr 21, 2011Chris WilloughbyApparatus and method for curled extrudate
US20120107470 *Oct 24, 2011May 3, 2012Gary NesheimString Cheese Cutting System
Classifications
U.S. Classification425/319, 425/463
International ClassificationA21C11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA21C11/16, A21C11/00, A21C3/08
European ClassificationA21C11/00, A21C3/08, A21C11/16