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Publication numberUS1463923 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 7, 1923
Filing dateJun 21, 1918
Publication numberUS 1463923 A, US 1463923A, US-A-1463923, US1463923 A, US1463923A
InventorsC. Nelson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
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US 1463923 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 7, 1923.

C. NELSON PAPER DRYING MACHINE Filed Oct. 22 1921 flfforng/s zen of the United States residing at Brooklyn, in the county of Patented Aug, 7, 19230 l ,tthhtt onann nntson', or nnoontrnnnw roan, assren'on; nr rrnsnn assrenrunnrs, ro

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rarnn-nnrnse rraonrnn' To allwhomz't may concern: 1 Be it known that l, CLARE Nnnson, a citi Kings, State of New York, have invented certainnew: and useful Improvements in Paper-Drying Machines;-

' and I dohe-reby declare the following to be a tull,.c1ear,-and exact description of the invention, such'as will enable others skilled.

in the art to which it appertainsto make and use the same. v, Y

-My invention s an improvement in dry ing machines, andrelates particularly to an improved machine for drying paper, after the methods set forth it has been coated b V in application Seria No. 24:1,102, filed June 21, 1918, and application, Serial No. 4192332, a film of filed August. It, 1921.

In carrying out these methods, moisture is first applied to one face of the I sheet, andthe said'fa'ce is afterwards s at tered with specks of color,-one or more co ors being used, and'the colors'areapplied in succession to the same area, as ,in application, Serial No. 241,102, filed June 21, 1918, or simultaneously to the same area, as in application, Serial No. $92,932 filed Aug. 17,

1921. It is desirable in order to attain attractive andartistic effects, that the colors be. set-quickly afterblending, that is that the webot paper be quickly dried, thereby avoiding the danger of the colors running, as well as the need for supporting the. paper for a relatively'long time in testoons, as is the usual practice. In dryingmachines of the character shown and described in applications, Serial No. 475,795 filed June 7, 1921,

and Serial No. 477 ,422 filed June 14:, 1921, a

casing, or a series of casings, is provided, through which the coatedpaper 1s. drawn, moving on or with a suitable support, arranged within-the casing, and extending the full length thereof. Air is circulated through the casing, and heating meansis arranged within the casing for heating the air as it circulates, to dry the paper. The casrugs are rectangular in transverse cross-section,jproviding thusan internal, capacity in excess of that required for the .proper circulation of the an and the passage of the paper. The angles between the walls of the casing provide dead air pockets which impede the rapid changing of the air es 'sential to quick drying, and-the shape of the casing results in an appreciable waste ofheat by convection and radiation.

The object of the present invention is to provide a-construction of casing, such that heat losses through convection and radiation are greatly lessened, and all obstruction to the rapid and complete changing of the air is eliminated, and wherein the paper .is quickly and thoroughly dried in a relacasing is provided with inlet and outlet passages2 and 3 at its opposite ends, through which the web't of. paper may enter and leave the casing. lhe web of paper in its movement through the casing is supported by .the upper run of an endless belt 5, oil foraminous material, as for instance wire cloth. l he upper run of the belt extends through thepassages 2 and 3, and is supported by rollers '6 journaled transversely of the casing, the rollers being arranged at suitable intervals to properly support the run and the web. The lower run of the belt is below the casing, and outside of the casing the belt passes over rollers 7 arranged in suchmanner that the belt does not engage the casing, and may move freely with the paper web as it passes through the casing. Below the casing tension rollers 8 are arranged, for

tensioning the belt, and the web is drawn through the casing'1,-by means of rollers 9 which grip the web beyond the casing.

Suitable means is arranged within the. casing for heating the air, the said means being in the present instance, electrically controlled heatin means 10. The heatin units are arranged adjacent to the outlet en of the casing, and extend from the said outlet end about two-thirds the'length of the casing. -When the dryer is used for drying ,coated paper, for which it is especially do vertical section able length and cross-section, and the said lot signed, the heating units need be arranged above the web only. a paper web, as it leaves the wet end of a paper making machine, the heating means willbe arranged above and below the web. Thedryer units may be arranged in the manner shown and described in application 1 Serial No. 475,795, filed June 7 1921., that is in series, one above the other, or they may be arranged in series in alinement one with the other, or a single unit may be used. Means is, .provided for circulating air through the ing means, to dry theweb, and to remove the vapor as it forms. The said means comthe casings are rectangular in-qtranverse cross-sections: This arrangement provides corners .which' form dead air pockets, for

.the collection of vapor, which condenses at such points. In order to eliminate these pockets, Imake the casing oval, or elliptical in cross-section as shown in- Figure 2, and the top of the casing is preferably of copwhich is polished on its inner face. The

- polished, arched shape act's'as a reflector,

throwing the heat onto the upper face of the web, thus utilizing. the heat provided by the heating means to the best possible advantage. The particular shape of the interior of the casing, oflers the least possible im pediment to the free circulation of air, and eliminates all pockets where vapor laden air might collect. A v

If it is desired to constrain the web to take an arched formation as it passes through the dryer unit, as is desirable in treating certain grades of paper,'as 'for instance heavy paper board, the alternative arra'n e'ment shown in Figure 3 may be used. n this construction, the casing 16, which is of the same cross-section as that of Figure 1,.is arched longitudinally, so that an arched formation is given'to. the web during its passage through the dryer. In such construction, the Web is supported by the belt 17. of foraminous material, whose upper run passes longitudinally of the -'casing, being supported by rollers '18, to provide the arched formation. The web 19 is drawn through the casing by rollers '20, and the-- heating means is in the form of electrical units 21, arranged above the web, in the same manner as the heating means 10 is WVhen used for drying v casing to be heated by the heatarranged inthe casing oval form is especially desirable forfdry ng a paper web as it comes from the wet-end of a paper .m'aking machine, the top and the .bottom of the casing actingas reflectors. In Figures land 5 there is'shown a construction whereinthetop E21 of the cas ing 224 arched transversely. As shown 1. The elliptical or more particularly in Figure 5, the bottom.

of the casing is flat and plane. The webin its passage through the casing is supported by rods '23, Which extend'longitudinally of the casing, in sp'acedrelation, the paper Web 24 resting.

The Web is moved through the casing, by a pair of rollers 25, and the, heating means 26, electrically controlled in tl'IG'PIGSQDtlIP directly on the rodsstance, are arranged in the same manner as v in Figures 1 and 3. In each construction,

the top of-the casing is'preferably of copper, or copper lined, and highly polished, to provide for a maximum of reflection. Thus the top is a reflector, and cooperates with the source of he,at, which is a source of radiant heat, reflecting the same upon the -P@P I-claim: "1. In a machine for drying paper, a Gasing through which the paper is adapted to be drawn, means for circulating air through [the casing, a source ofradiant heat within the casing, and means in connection with the casing for reflecting the heat upon the paper to be dried.

2. In "a machine. 'fordrying paper, a cas-'- ing through which the paper is adapted to' be drawn, means within the casing for supporting the paper in'its passage through the casing, means for circulating air through the casing, a source of radiant'heat arranged within the casing above the paper for heating the 'air'circulating through the casing,-

said casing having a transverselyarched top acting. as a reflector for the heat. 1 3. In a machine for drying paper, a casing-through which the paper is adapted to be drawn, means within the. casing for supporting-the paper in its passage through the casing, heating means in the casing above the paper,

through the casing to L porting the paper in its passage through the and means'for circulating air for the purpose s casing, heating nieans' in"- the casing .above' the paper, ,and means .,for circulating air through the casing-to be heated and driedbythe heating means, the top of the casing being arched transversely and 'internally polished for the purpose ,speci-u 5. In a machine for drying paper, a caswithin the casing for heating the air and ing through which the paper is adapted to arranged above the paper, and a reflector be drawn, means within the casing for supabove the radiant heating means for re porting the paper in its passage through fleeting the heat upon the paper. the casing, heating means in the casing 8. In a machine for drying paper, a cas above the paper, and means for circulating ing through which the paper is adapted to air through the casing to be heated and be drawn, means for circulating air dried by the heating means, the casing be through the casing, a source of heat withing oval in transverse cross-section and havin the casing, and means in connection With. ing the top thereof polished internally for the casing for reflecting the heat upon the the purpose specified. paper to be dried.

6. In a machine. for drying paper, a cas- 9. In a machine for drying paper or the ing through which the paper is adapted to like, a casing through which the paper is be drawn, means within the casing for sup-. adapted to .be drawn, a source of heat porting the paper in its passage through Within the casing, and means in connection the casing, means for circulating air with the casing for reflecting the heat upon through the casing, radiant heating means the paper to be dried.

Within the casing for heating the air, and a 10. In a machine for drying paper or the reflector above the radiant heating means like, a casing through Which the paper is for reflecting the heat upon the paper. adapted to be drawn, a source of radiant In a machine for drying paper, a casheat within the casing, and means in' coning through which the paper is adapted to nection with the casing for reflecting the be drawn, means within the casing for supheat upon the paper to be dried. porting the paper in its passage through In testimony WhereofI aflix my signature.

the caslng, means for circulating air through the casing, radiant heating means CLARE NELSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2419876 *Sep 1, 1942Apr 29, 1947Dehydration IncDehydration apparatus having conveyors, agitators, radiant heaters, and gas circulating means
US2427892 *Oct 16, 1944Sep 23, 1947 Apparatus for drying webs by radi
US2430191 *Sep 10, 1943Nov 4, 1947Metals & Controls CorpAtmospheric control means
US2438226 *Jul 10, 1944Mar 23, 1948Jonas & Naumburg CorpCarroting and drying of fur-bearing animal skins
US2440648 *Jan 19, 1944Apr 27, 1948Uxbridge Worsted Co IncApparatus for drying cloth with air
US2445443 *Feb 10, 1942Jul 20, 1948Westinghouse Electric CorpMeans for drying extended lengths of thread with infrared lamps
US2446822 *Aug 11, 1943Aug 10, 1948Grapp Herbert LMethod and apparatus for removing volatiles from articles involving the use of infra-red lamps
US2552245 *May 24, 1945May 8, 1951Crown Cork & Seal CoApparatus for handling and coating strip material
US2559713 *Jan 22, 1947Jul 10, 1951Regout Georges MarieMethod and apparatus for drying and tentering-drying with radiant heaters and automatic control means
US2676417 *Nov 20, 1950Apr 27, 1954August Ekelund Sigvard FransLaboratory drying oven
US2831269 *Feb 2, 1953Apr 22, 1958Albert Van Luit & CoDrying apparatus
US2862305 *Jul 6, 1954Dec 2, 1958Dungler JulienApparatus for drying strip material
US3073152 *May 12, 1959Jan 15, 1963Hilding Hultgren HjalmarMachines for determining the dry substance in various materials
US3364594 *Jul 8, 1965Jan 23, 1968Addressograph MultigraphDrying processed photographic material
US4361466 *Apr 25, 1980Nov 30, 1982Beloit CorporationAir impingement web drying method and apparatus
US8322047Jun 27, 2008Dec 4, 2012Moore Wallace North America, Inc.System and method for drying a freshly printed medium
US8545941 *Nov 1, 2011Oct 1, 2013Nakamoto Packs Co., Ltd.Method of drying coating liquid agent and apparatus therefor
US20130108794 *Nov 1, 2011May 2, 2013Nakamoto Packs Co., Ltd.Method of drying coating solution and apparatus therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification34/629, 34/201, 118/65, 118/68, 34/228
International ClassificationF26B13/02
Cooperative ClassificationF26B13/10