Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1467510 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 11, 1923
Filing dateApr 29, 1921
Priority dateApr 29, 1921
Publication numberUS 1467510 A, US 1467510A, US-A-1467510, US1467510 A, US1467510A
InventorsSmith Jr George Tandy
Original AssigneeSmith Jr George Tandy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Laying composition shingles
US 1467510 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 1.1, 1923. 1,467.510

G. T. SMITH, JR

LAYING COMPOSITION SH INGLE Filed April 29 1921 TANDY SMITH, 33., 0E PAIYUC, KENTUCKY.

LAYING CCMPOSITION SHINGLES.

Application filed April 29, 1921. Serial No. 465,525.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I. Gnonon TANDY SMITH, Jru-a citizen of the United States, residing at Paducali. in the county of McCra'cken and State of Kentucky, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Laying Composition Shingles; and I do herebyde clare the following to be a full, clear, and,

exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same.

This invention relates to composition roofing, and more particularly to a new method of connecting and laying asphalt or other composition shingles.

It is well known that strip or roll shingles which have machine cut joints or spacing, and consist practically of one piece of roofing, invariably buckle or become'rough in appearance, due to expansion or contraction or to the roof deck seasoning beneath them which individual shingles will not do, and the objects of my invention are to pro vide means for connecting individual as phalt or composition shingles and spacing them in such manner as to avoid the trouble of spacing them by measurement when the roof is being laid, and to make the laying practically as economical as the laying of the ordinary strip or roll shingles, and also to avoid the unsightly appearance of indi-' vidual shingles when spaced by mere guesswork, and at the same time to retain all of the advantages of individual shingles, which are much better in every way than the strip or roll shingles, and not to interfere in any way with the present method of packing and shipping such shingles, whereby the time ordinarily required in laying individual shingles and consequently the cost of laying on the roof is greatly reduced.

The invention will first be hereinafter more particularly described, with reference to the accompanying drawings, which are to be taken as a part of this specification, and then pointed out in the claims at the end of the description.

In said drawings,

Fig. 1 is a plan view illustrating two scries'of flexibly connected asphalt or other composition shingles spaced apart and laid in accordance with my invention; and

Fig. 2 isan end view of one of said series illustrating how the shingles may be folded to economize space in packing for transportation or storage.

Referring to said drawings, in which the same. reference letters are used to denote corresponding parts in different views, the letters A, A, denote individual shingles or sections of roofing material composed of asphal-t or other composition and connected together so as to be handled as a unit by means of flexible strips B, B, of paper, cloth, or other suitable material secured to the under sides of the shingles by means of glue or other adhesive substance, so as to render the strips invisible after the roof is laid, the individual shingles being spaced apart to the extent desired for roofing purposes. Any desired number of shingles, within reason, may be connected together in the manner stated, to facilitate the laying and eliminate the necessity for spacing. As shown, there are two connecting strips B, B, secured on the undersides of the series of shingles, and consisting preferabl of tough paper, though other material and a greater or less number of strips may be used.' The lower strip is adapted to serve as a line for the next course of shingles to be laid, the bottoms or lower ends of the next course being laid directly over the lower edge of the lower connecting strip, which is placed the required distance from the lower ends of the shingles, while the upper strip is secured near the upper ends of the series. The two strips are adapted to provide the exact spacing desired along the entire-length of the sides of adjacent shingles.

Shingles connected as described may be laid in much less time and with much less trouble than individual shingles, with consequent saving in the cost of laying and spacing on the roof, as the connecting strips insure correct spacin between shingles and render it easy to p ace onelayer or series upon another at the exact distance desired between the lower ends thereof and the subjacent course or their upper ends and the next succeeding course without requiring the use of any measuring instrument, "and with absolute accuracy, which is not possible in laying individual shingles and spaci with the eyes, and at the same time all of the advantages of individual shingles are retained, and if any expansion or contraction occurs after the shingles are laid,'the paper coning strips also permit the series of shingles to be folded in compact'form for storage or transportation.

Having thus described my invention,

what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. As a new article of manufacture, a series of individual shingle-like sections of roofin material connected together in slightfy separated relation by strips of flexible material secured thereto by an adhesive substance, there being an upper and a lower strip extending longitudinally across the series, the lower strip being located at an intermediate'point to adapt it to serve as a line for laying the next course of shingles with their lower ends directly over its lower edge.

2. A roof composed of individual shingles of a suitable composition, the individual shingles of each layer spaced apart and connected together by upper and lower flexible strips secured thereto by an adhesive substance, whereby the series may be handled as a unit and folded for storage or transportation, the lower connecting strip of each series being located at an intermediate point to adapt it to serve as a line for laying the next course of shingles with their lower ends over the lower edge of said intermediate connecting strip.

3. As a new article of manufacture, a series of individual sections of roofing material spaced apart and connected together by flexible strips secured thereto on the under sides thereof by an adhesive substance and extending across the series, one strip be ing arranged near one end and another at an intermediate point, the edges of adjacent sections being-properly spaced for'laying so that the lower connecting strip is adapted to serve as a line for-laying the next succeeding course. L a

4. A series of individual-sections of ,roofing material connected together in slightly separated relation and adapted to be handled as a unit and folded in compactform, the connections between the sections consisting of strips of paper secured on the under sides of the strips by an adhesive substance, one strip being located adjacent the upper ends of the series and another strip at an intermediate point, the intermediate strip being adapted to serve as a line for laying the next succeeding course or layer of connected sections.

In testimony whereof I aflix my signature in the presence of two Witnesses.

GEORGE TANDY SMITH, JR. Witnesses:

NEAL W. Down, J. D. WILmAmsoN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3640044 *Sep 11, 1969Feb 8, 1972Raymond W WattsPrefabricated panel of shingles
US5916103 *Dec 17, 1997Jun 29, 1999Roberts; Jimmie A.Interconnected roofing shingles
US6983571 *Sep 28, 2001Jan 10, 2006Teel Plastics, Inc.Composite roofing panel
US7735287Jan 23, 2007Jun 15, 2010Novik, Inc.Roofing panels and roofing system employing the same
US8020353Jan 26, 2009Sep 20, 2011Novik, Inc.Polymer building products
US8209938Mar 8, 2010Jul 3, 2012Novik, Inc.Siding and roofing panel with interlock system
US8256185 *Nov 8, 2007Sep 4, 2012Kirkey Bryan JPre-assembled shingle set and installation system
US8347578 *Aug 1, 2012Jan 8, 2013Kirkey Bryan JShingle assembly set
US8950135Dec 19, 2013Feb 10, 2015Novik Inc.Corner assembly for siding and roofing coverings and method for covering a corner using same
US8991130 *Feb 6, 2014Mar 31, 2015Owens Corning Intellectual Capital, LlcShingle with reinforced nail zone and method of manufacturing
US9121178May 2, 2014Sep 1, 2015Owens Corning Intellectual Capital, LlcShingle with reinforcement nail zone and method of manufacturing
US9388565Dec 20, 2012Jul 12, 2016Novik Inc.Siding and roofing panels and method for mounting same
US20080083186 *Jan 23, 2007Apr 10, 2008Novik, Inc.Roofing panels and roofing system employing the same
US20080141609 *Nov 8, 2007Jun 19, 2008Kirkey Bryan JPre-assembled shingle set and installation system
US20100205887 *Feb 19, 2009Aug 19, 2010John RiinaFast installing roof shingle
US20110214375 *Mar 8, 2010Sep 8, 2011Michel GaudreauSiding and roofing panel with interlock system
US20140150365 *Feb 6, 2014Jun 5, 2014Owens Corning Intellectual Capital, LlcShingle with reinforced nail zone and method of manufacturing
USD648038Jul 28, 2010Nov 1, 2011Novik, Inc.Shingle
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/557, 52/420
International ClassificationE04D1/00, E04D1/26
Cooperative ClassificationE04D1/26
European ClassificationE04D1/26