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Publication numberUS1469920 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 9, 1923
Filing dateSep 21, 1922
Priority dateSep 21, 1922
Publication numberUS 1469920 A, US 1469920A, US-A-1469920, US1469920 A, US1469920A
InventorsJohn Dutchak
Original AssigneeJohn Dutchak
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spring heel
US 1469920 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

oct. 9, 1923.l 1,469,920 J.DUTCHAK SPRING HEEL Filed Sept. 21. 1922 i m Sii-Tun i mmmmmmmm U ,4 in El Fla. 4. 4

v MME Patented @et 9, 1923.

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sirenas, HEEL.

Applicationiled September 2l, 1922. Serial No. 589,576.

To /zZZ whom t may conf/ewa.'

lie it known that l, JOHN Euro1-Lin, a citizen of Ukraine, residing at lf'iyde Park, in the county of Suffolk and State of Massachusetts, have invented certain new and useful improvements in Spring Heels, of which the following is a specification.

l` his invention relates to certain new and useful improvements in springl heels for hoots or shoes wherein a plurality of metallic springs are interposed between the upper and lower lifts of a heel with telescopic sections constituting a part of the heel enclosing1 the spring. a n

lhe primary obgect of theV invention resides in the provision of a spring heel of the type above set forth, and particularly wherein coil springs are employed, the particular manner of anchoring the ends of the coil springs to the upper and lower lifts of the heel embodying plates to which the ends of the springs are seciired while the plates are respectively secured to the upper and lower lifts.

lVith the above and other objects in view the invention consists of the novel form, combination and arrangement of parts hereinafter more fully described, shown in the accompanying drawing and claimed.

ln the drawing, wherein like reference characters designate corresponding parts throughout the several views,

Figure 1 is a longitudinal sectional view of a spring heel constructed in accordance with the present invention, showing metallic coil springs positioned between upper and lower lifts of a heel with telescoping side walls of the heel inclosing the springs, and further showing the springs anchored at their upper and lower ends to the lifts of the shoe heel,

Figure 2 is side elevational view of the upper and lower lifts removed from the heel with the coil springs interposed therehetween and anchored to said lift,

Figure 3 is a fragmentary tcp plan View of the construction shown in Fig. 2 with the upper lift removed to show the anchorplate for the ends of the coil springs,

Figure 4 shows perspective views of the spring anchoring plates and fastening staples associated therewith,

Figure 5 is a longitudinal sectional view of a modified form of spring heel showing the use of return bent band springs,

Figure 6 is a horizontal sectional view of the heelshown in Fig. 5v illustrating the 1ongitudinally extending leaf springs in top plan view, and y Figure 7 is a top plan view oftherheel shown in Fig. 5 removed from ,the upper and illustrating the staple fastening for securing Vthe heel to the upper.

-Referring more in detail to the accompanying drawing, and particularly to Figs. 1 to 4, there isJ illustrated a spring .heel for boots or shoes associated with the upper 1 and embodying upper and lower sections 2 and 3 respectively.

The upper section 2 embodies a lift 4 having marginally secured thereto a depending skirt or apron 5 formed of any suitable Inay ,y

terial, such as metal, leather or rubber.

The lower heel section 3 embodies a lift (3 carrying a marginal upstanding skirt orv flange 7 vthat telescopes within the ange 5 depending from'the upper heel section 2 as d shown in Fig. 1, while a tread block 8 of i rubber is secured to the lower face of the i lift 6.

As shown more clearly in 1 and 2, a

plurality of metallic coil springs 9 are iny tei-posed between the upper and lower lifts 4 and 6, the opposite ends of the coil springs 9 being anchord to plates thatare in turn respectively securedv to the adjacent lifts. The anchoring plates 10 associated with each end of the spring is shown more clearly in Fig. 4, the same being of substantially rectangular formation in plan view having a tapering or wedge shaped slot 11 formed in one end thereof while the opposite end is apertured as at 12. The formation of the wedge shaped block 11 provides side legs 13 in the anchoring plate 10, the outer ends of which are apertured as at 14 for purposes presently to appear. The end 9a of the coil spring 9 is forced into the wedge slot 11 in the anchoring plate 10 with the terminal Y end of said spring directed through the opening 12 as shown more clearly in Figs. 2 and 3. A U-shaped staple 15 has the side thereof passed therethrough the openings 14 in the vlegs 13 of the anchoring plate and are associated with the lifts 4 of the upper section of the heel and the shoe upper 1 in a manner to constitute a fastening device for the heel. The anchoring plate 10 is associatedwith the lower' ends of the spring 9 and are secured to the lower lift 6 by fastening devices 16 as shown in Fig. 2, thereby forming a connection between the upper and lower sections 2 and 3 of the heel. y

From the above detail description of the device, it is believed that thek construction and operation thereof will at once be apparent, it being noted that the coil springs 9 are confined within theV marginal flanges 5 and 7 carried by the upper and lower sections of the heel and telescoping within each other, the anchoring plates l() constitut-v ing a positive anchoring means for the ends of the springs and an easy method of securing the same to the lifts of the upper and lower sections.

In the form of the invention shown in Figs. 5 and 7, the upper lift la of the heel is provided with a marginal depending skirt or flange 5L that incloses the lower lift 6u that carries a rubber tread block 8a. In lieu of the coil springs Qreturn bent leaf springs 17 are employed, the same being arranged side byside and extending longitudinally of the heel as illustrated in Fig. 6, the lower ends of the` vleaf springs 17 being secured as at 16a to the lower lift 6, while similar fastening devices 16 secure the upper ends of said springs to the upper lift 4a. The connection between the upper lift laf and the shoe, upper l embodies lli-shaped staples 15@L extending through the upperlift 4a. and the shoe upper la as shown inFiigs. 5 and 7.

lVhile there are herein shown and described the preferred embodiments of the invention, it is neverthelessto be understood that minor changes may be made therein without departing from the spirit and; scope thereof as claimed.

Vhat is claimed as new is l. In a spring heel for shoes, upper and vlower telescoping sections, coil spring interwedge-shaped slot therein for receiving the end of the spring, and lmeans for securing the anchoring plates to the adjacent sections.

2. In a spring heel for shoes, upperrand lower telescoping sections, coil spring interposed between the sections, anchoring plates associated with the ends of the springs, and each being of rectangular formation having a wedge-shaped slot therein for receivinglthe end of the spring, means for securing the lower anchoring plates to the lower section, and U-shaped staples securing the upper anchoring plates to the upper section and shoe upper.

3. In a spring heel for shoes, upper and lower telescoping sec-tions, coil springs interposed between the sections, anchoring plates associated with the ends of the springs, and each being of retangular for'- mation having a wedge-shaped slot therein for receiving the enel of the spring, said slot forming side legs having openings in theI ends thereof, means for vsecuring the lower anchoring plates to the lower section, and U-shaped staples inserted in the Yleg openingsof the upper anchoring plates for securing the upper ends of the springs to the upperI heel section and shoe upper.

In testimony whereof I afiiX my signature.

JOHN DUTCHAK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2535102 *Nov 24, 1945Dec 26, 1950Walton Taylor JamesShoe heel
US2669038 *Nov 19, 1951Feb 16, 1954De Werth RobertShock absorbing shoe heel
US4638575 *Jan 13, 1986Jan 27, 1987Illustrato Vito JSpring heel for shoe and the like
US4881329 *Sep 14, 1988Nov 21, 1989Wilson Sporting Goods Co.Athletic shoe with energy storing spring
US5282325 *Oct 19, 1992Feb 1, 1994Beyl Jean Joseph AlfredShoe, notably a sports shoe, which includes at least one spring set into the sole, cassette and spring for such a shoe
US6006449 *Jan 29, 1998Dec 28, 1999Precision Products Group, Inc.Footwear having spring assemblies in the soles thereof
US6665957Oct 18, 2001Dec 23, 2003Shoe Spring, Inc.Fluid flow system for spring-cushioned shoe
US7159338Jan 31, 2005Jan 9, 2007Levert Francis EFluid flow system for spring-cushioned shoe
US7219447Jan 31, 2005May 22, 2007Levert Francis ESpring cushioned shoe
US7334351Jun 7, 2004Feb 26, 2008Energy Management Athletics, LlcShoe apparatus with improved efficiency
US7624515May 30, 2006Dec 1, 2009Mizuno CorporationSole structure for a shoe
US7788824Jun 7, 2005Sep 7, 2010Energy Management Athletics, LlcShoe apparatus with improved efficiency
US8555526 *Apr 24, 2012Oct 15, 2013Alexander ElnekavehResilient shoe with pivoting sole
US20120204442 *Apr 24, 2012Aug 16, 2012Alexander ElnekavehResilient shoe with pivoting sole
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/38
International ClassificationA43B21/30, A43B21/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B21/30
European ClassificationA43B21/30