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Publication numberUS1470097 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 9, 1923
Filing dateApr 21, 1922
Priority dateApr 21, 1922
Publication numberUS 1470097 A, US 1470097A, US-A-1470097, US1470097 A, US1470097A
InventorsNeff August E
Original AssigneePhoenix Trimming Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fringe for rugs and the like and method of making the same
US 1470097 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. E. NEFF FRINGE FOR RUGS AND THE LIKE AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Filed April 21, 1922 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 wmwf ywewk ,5413. I

Oct. 9 1923. 1,470,097

A. E. NEFF FRINGE FOR BUGS AND THE LIKE AND METHOD OF" MAKING THE SAME F i le'd April 21. 1922 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Oct. 9 1923.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

AUGUST E. NEFF, OF OHICAGO, ILLINOIS, ASSIGNOR '10 PHOENIX TRIMMING COM PANY, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, A CORPORATION OF ILLINOIS.

FRINGE FOR RUG-S AND THE LIKE AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME.

Application filed April 21, 1922. Serial No. 555,874.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, AUGUST E. Nnrr, a citizen of the United States, residing at Chicago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in ringe for Bugs and the like and Methods of Making the Same.

The invention will be described as embodied in an ornamental fringe or edging for rugs curtains, upholstery and the ike.

The primary object of the invention is to produce an article of manufacture such as stated comprising a tasselled fringe or edging having a sufiiciently firm structure to adapt the same as an ornamental finishing for rugs and the like.

It is a further object of the invention to produce a fringe or edging of the character stated at a greatly reduced cost and one that will be superior in appearance and adaptability to the usesto which such materials are usually put.

Other objects of the invention will appear from the following description which is directed to the preferred embodiment of the invention, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part thereof, the novel features being more particularly set forth in the appended claims.

The invention will now be described in detail, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part of the specification in which Fig. l is a schematic view showing the course of the warp and filler strands in the manufacture of a tasselled fringe having a single binder course uniting the tassels, as shown in Fig. 2.

Fig. 3 is a schematic view showing the course of the Warp and filler strands in the manufacture of a tasselled fringe having two binder courses uniting the tassels, as shown in Fig. 4.

Like reference characters designate like parts throughout the drawings.

Reference character A (Figs. 1 and 2) designates generally that portion of the fringe which will for the sake of clarity be termed the mat which ma be woven in any suitable weave and conslsts of any desired number of war strands to form the desired width of the mat and preferably a plurality of filler strands in each shot through the sheds of the warp strands, the

number of filler strands included in each shot depending upon the design of the fringe to be attained in the finished product.

As illustrated inFig. 1 of the drawings each shot of the filler embraces four filler strands designated by reference characters 10, 11, 12 and 13. After the filler strands are shot through the sheds of the warp strands in one direction the heddles or harness of the loom shift in the ordinary manner forming a new shed, and the filler strands are shot therethrough in the opposite direction a predetermined distance beyond one edge of the mat where they are cut by the loom knife or may be subsequently cut forming the tassels of the fringe. At a point intermediate the edge of the matand the free ends of the ller strands, the filler strands are bound by a binding course consisting of warp strands'l? and designated generally by the reference character The tassels designated generally by reference character C are thus made up of the filler strands laid in multiples of four strands, for example, as shown in the drawings. To form the size of the tassels, the weft strands are at intervals folded backwardly or toward the mat through the sheds formed in the strands of warp in the binde course B, and by suitably shifting the heddles or harness of the loom this interval weaving of the weft multiple strands may assume the form shown at D, or any desired number of loops or sinuses which will determine the spacing between the tassels as well as the tassels size. It will be readily seen by reference to Fig. 2 that the looping of the filler strands, as designated by the reference character D, through the binder course B forms spaces 15 between the tassels C, giving the fringe a highly ornamental efl'ect. After the fringe has been formed as described, on the loom, it is placed on a sewing machine and one or more rows of stitching run through the binder course B, as designated by reference character 16, to prevent the shifting of the filler strands with relation to the binder course B In F igs. 3 and 4 is shown a modified and more ornate form of fringe having a mat designated generally by the reference character E, and two binder courses designated and passed generally by the reference characters F and G, the mat E having warp strands 17 and filler strands 18 with warp strands 1%? for forming a second or supplemental binder course F, and warp strands 20 for forming binder course G.

In the modified form of the invention, as shown in Figs. 3 and 4 the filler strands are caught and bound in groups, designated as H and O by binder courses F and G, respectively, and in this form of the invention each shot of filler comprises preferably although not necessarily three strands 18, which are shot through binder F and 100 ed backwardly toward mat E, and the hedc les of the loom shifted, forming a new shed and the filler strands shot therethrough in the T opposite direction, when the heddles are again shifted and the looped filler strands shot through binder G becoming a part of the tassels, thereby forming spaces 21, between the groups H. Each of the groups H are divided into two portions of an equal number of filler strands and the contiguous portions of contiguous groups bound by binder course G, thus forming tassels L. Three of the filler strands 18 are looped upon themselves in double loops between tassels L and bound by the shifting of the heddles with warp strands 20, and then carried backwardly through binder course F and mat E, thus forming the spacing loops D in binder course G, and so spacing the tassels L apart.

In the form of the fringe having the double rows of binder courses as described in connection with the disclosure in Figs. 3 and 4, the tassel and tassel loops are also firmly united by stitching with one or more rows of stitching through binder courses F and G and parallel with the wrap strands comprising the same, just as shown in the drawing and as I have described the stitching through binder course B of Figs. 1 and 2.

I have found this firm uniting of the tassel strands through warp binder courses by stitching, of the greatest importance when the fringe is used as a finishing for rugs. The stitching gives a surprising firmness to the fringe, making it easier to attach to the end of a rug as an ornate finishing or trimming means; makes the fringe lay better on the floor; prevents distortion by the pulling or kinking of the tassel strands through the binder courses when subjected to floor use; and finally greatly enhances the life of the fringe on a rug because, whenthe binder strands on an unsewn fringe is worn through, the tassel strands loosen and roughen up, which renders it unsightly and practically unserviceable, while if stitched as described, the abrading or destruction of the binder course at any given point will not release the strands of the tassels, which will nevertheless continue to be firmly held in normal position by the stitching.

In order that the lnvention might be un derstood the details of the preferred embodiment have been shown and particularly described, but it is not desired to be limited to the mere details of the invention, for it will be apparent that persons skilled in the art may resort to various modifications without departing from the purpose and spirit of the invention.

1 claim:

1. A fabric having a mat formed of warp strands and filler strands, the filler strands extending beyond one edge of the mat and being bound together by a bindercourse intermediate the edge of the mat and the ends of the filler strands, and stitching uniting the filler strands and the binder course.

2. A fabric having a mat formed of war strands and filler strands, the filler str'an extending beyond one edge of the mat and being bound together intermediate the edges of the mat and the ends of the strands by warp strands, forming tassels spaced apart and stitching extending transversely of the tassels through the binding warp strands.

3. A fabric having a mat formed of wa strands and filler strands, the filler stran extending beyond one edge of the mat and being bound together intermediate the edge of the mat and the end of the strands by warp strands forming tassels, the tassels being spaced apart by an intervening portion of the fabric, and stitching extendin transversely of the tassels through the inding warp strands.

4. A fabric having a mat formed of we strands and filler strands, the filler stran extending beyond one edge of the mat and being bound together intermediate the edge of the mat and the ends of the strands forming tassels, the tassels being spaced .apart by the looping of a portion of the filler strands in the weave therebetween, and stitching extending transversely of the tassels and looped portions of the filler strands where bound together.

5. A fabric comprising a mat and a binder course formed of warp strands and filler strands, the binder course being spaced from the mat, the filler strands extendin through and beyond one edge of the mat an through the binder course and being bound together intermediate the edge of the mat and the ends of the strands forming tassels, the tassels being spaced apart by a portion of the fabric woven therebetween, and stitching through the binder course uniting the spacing means and the tassels.

6. The method of forming a fabric by interweaving filler strands for a portion of their length with warp strands thereby forming a mat with certain of the filler strands extending beyond one edge of the mat and at the same time interweaving a predetermined number of the filler strands with a course of warp strands separated from the body of the'mat intermediate the edge of the mat and the ends ofthe filler strands. and then stitching through the last said warp strands along a line parallel therewith for the purpose of securing the filler strands to the binder course intermediate the edge of the mat and the ends of said filler strands.

7. The method of forming a fabric comprising a mat and a plurality of binder courses by interweaving the warp strands and the filler strands to form the mat and the binder courses. there being a plurality of the binder courses spaced from the mat and apart from each other. the said binder courses serving to hold the filler strands looped in opposite directions through the binder courses spaced from the mat, the said looped filler strands and the spaced binder courses being secured to the tassels by stitching through the binder courses.

8. A fabric comprising a woven mat of warp strands and weft strands, the weft strands of the fabric extending on one side of the mat to form a fringe, there being certain of said weft strands looped and interwoven with two separated groups of warp strands spaced apart from the mat body to form binder courses for securing and holding the weft strands in position to form tassels, and rows of stitching for securing the tassels and binder courses firmly together paralleling the aforesaid warp strands of the spaced binder courses and intersecting the looped portions of the weft strands in the binder courses.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification on this 11th day of April A. D. 1922.

AUGUST E. NEFF.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2557819 *May 17, 1949Jun 19, 1951Fischer LeoWoven fabric
US3889616 *Mar 18, 1974Jun 17, 1975Card Joseph LTufted fringe product
US5876535 *Jun 6, 1995Mar 2, 1999Moulavi; OuriMethod for aligning rug fringe and rug obtained thereby
US6817384 *Jul 3, 2002Nov 16, 2004Ming-Che ChangMethod of weaving straw decorative ribbon by plastic tape
EP0478022A1 *Aug 8, 1991Apr 1, 1992Alberto KopelowiczA braid
Classifications
U.S. Classification112/409, 139/385, D05/18, 28/145
International ClassificationD04D5/00
Cooperative ClassificationD04D5/00
European ClassificationD04D5/00