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Publication numberUS1470117 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 9, 1923
Filing dateFeb 3, 1922
Priority dateFeb 3, 1922
Publication numberUS 1470117 A, US 1470117A, US-A-1470117, US1470117 A, US1470117A
InventorsMacrae Nelson
Original AssigneeMacrae Nelson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game
US 1470117 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

N. MacRAE GAME Filed Feb. s sheets-sneet 1 GREEN EAWLM 7 N. MaCRAE GAME Filed Feb. 5, 1922 'sheets-Sheet 2 Patented et.a Q,

i' NELSON MacRAE, 0F WILMINGTON, NRTH CLENA.

GAME.

Application filed February 3, 1922. Serial No. 538,900.

.To all whom z't may conce'wi:

Be it known that l, NELSON: MacRAE, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Wilmingtom in the county of New Hanover and State of North Carolina, have invented 'vcertainrnew and useful improvements in a Game, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to games and more pfarticluflarly toa game simulating the game o o ltg is the object of my invention to provide an lindoor' vgolf game in which the actual strokes which are made by the player may be indicated on a golf course, the golf course comprising a topography similar to that encountered on actual golf courses.-

In carrying out my invention, l provide a plurality of prints each of which represents one hole of a golf course including the tee, the fairway, the green, the hazards and all other topography incident to that par-v ticular section of the course. lt is intended that the prints of the holes of the course be reproductions drawn to scale of the leading golf courses of the country or of the course upon which the player or players are in the habit'of playing.

ln addition, my invention contemplates the use of what is known as a golf lmachine of which a number of types are now in universal use. rl`hese machines embody a golf ball and recording device which records the length of the stroke by registering approximately the distance the ball would have been driven upon a regular course by a similar stroke. For example, the types of golf machines shown in United States Patents 661,381, dated November 6, 1900, and 1,074,880, dated October 7th, 1913, may be satisfactorily used. My invention further contemplates the use of a putting carpet and indoor putting cup similar to thoseV now universally used although as will be explained more fully hereinafter` the puttingvcarpet and putting cup may be dispensed with.

For use in connection with theA charts or prints of the holes of the course, my invention contemplates the use of a scale, the divisions of which are on the same scale as the course 'and a protractor whereb arbitrary distances are established as in icative of the probable length of roll of the ball and the possibility of it encountering hazards @a or of it rolling o0 the fairway.

Imitation golf balls Vare further provided and are adapted to be placed on the course as indicating the play of each person. In

addition, there may also be provided printed cards containing the rules off the game and score cards of the course.

lin addition to the scale and protractor as mentioned hereinbefore, my invention further contemplates the use of a scale @5 arbitrarily indicating the divergence of pulled or fsliced shots whereby faulty strokes of this nature may be taken account of in yindicating the score of that particular pla er.

ne example of my invention will be described in detail in the accompanying specification and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a print or chart 75 of the holes of the course as it appears when in use, and

Fig. 7 is an enlarged view of the putting green illustrated on the print in Fig. 6.

In carrying out my invention in which a replica of an 18 hole course is to be made, 1 90 provide 18 charts or prints 10 such as illustrated in Fig. 1 upon each of which there is displayed one hole of the course, the to ography of the course being definitely de ned and indicated. These charts are preferably made of cardboard, linen or other similar A material so that golf balls used in connection with my game may be suitably attached to the charts at the desired points. As mentioned herein-before it is my intention to 10o reproduce famous golf'courses so that players in' using my game may become familiar with these courses and in this connection there is illustrated on the print 10 in Fig.

1, the 13th hole of the golf course at Glen- 105 eagles, Scotland. In this section of the course, there is illustrated the tee 11, the fairway 12, the putting green 13, and the `hazards 14 of various kinds'.

Obviously, if each print reproduces one hole of an actual golf course, the topography will be different from the illustrative example shown herein. But in general, there will be illustrated a tee, a fairway, a putting green 'and the associated hazards. It desired, there may be drawn centrally ot the fairway a scale line 15 indicating the distance from the tee to the hole.

In placing the ball at the completion of each stroke the player uses a scale 16, the division lines of which are arranged on the same scale as the course and a compensating protractor 17. The protractor 17 is provided witha longitudinal recess 18 of sufiicient size to receive the scale 16 so that in use the protractor 17 is placed upon the scale 16 and moved relatively thereto by means of a handle 19. vIn this connection the scale 16 may also be provided with a handle 2O for convenience in moving the same. The other end of the scale 16 is provided with a'notch 21 to enable it to be conveniently placed in Contact with the ball used in this game. The protractor 17 is madev of transparent material to enable the raduations on the scale to be visible theret rough and in this connection it has been found desirable also to form the scale 16 of a transparent material whereupon the exact positionon the course. may be noted.

One of the balls 22 is illustrated in Fig. 3 and as shown, is formed with a shank portion 23 with which the notch 21 is adapted to engage and a pin-like projection 24. In

lacing the balls 22 the projection 24 is orced into the chart 10, the ball remaining in position by reason of the same. In this connection it should be noted that a plurality of balls are provided each colored ditferently for identification purposes.

Around the hole on each print there is de scribed a plurality of circles, (see particularly Fig. 7) suitably denominated. Four of `these circles are herein denominated No. 1, No. 2, No. 3 and No. 4 respectively, these circles being drawn 0n a radius representing 5, 10, 15 and 20 feet fromthe hole indicated on the print. There is furthermore described a circle 25 denominated Minimum distance circle which indicates in general the minimum distance the golf machine will register with accuracy. It should be understood, however, that the distance of the minimum circle from the hole is arbitrary and may be changed to correspond to the design of the golf machine in connection wlth which this game is played. The circles denominatedNo. 1, No 2, No. 3 and No. 4 are used.in putting as will be more fully descrlbed hereinafter.

The method of la in m frame will now be described: p y g y C If for example, afoursome is to be played,

the side having the honour places their ball on the tee and lays the scale upon the course with the zero end at the position of the ball, the ,center line of the scale extending toward the desired direction -of'play, (see particularly Fig. 6). In this connection, the notch 21 surrounds the shank 23 of the ball. The first player then makes a stroke with the golf machine and notes the distance registered on the machine. The compensating protractor 17 is then placed upon the scale with the end A pointed in the direction of play. A lineV is selected on the protractor corresponding to the yardage indicated on the golf machine and the protractor is thereupon slid along the scale 16 until the selected line on the protractor coincides with the same yardage mark on the scale 16. Such coincidence is visible because of the transparency of the protractor. y

The area lying between the selected line on the protractor 17 and the rear edge B for any particular shot is calculated to show the roll of the ball for that length of shot and also the probable or average accuracy of the shot. Consequently if the area of the protractor lying between the line corresponding to the yardage and the rear edge B of the protractor covers any trap, hazard or rough` or any art thereof, the ball shall be placed in said azard, 'trap or rough and the next shot played accordingly. When the said area of the protractor covers more than one hazard at the same time, the ball shall be placed -in the hazardl which will incur the most severe penalty to the player. Where two hazards are in the same line ofplay, the ball shall be placed in the one furthest from the. hole. In any hazard the ball may be placed in the most advantageous position in preparation for the next stroke.

By way of example, reference being had to Figs. 2 and 6, it will be assumed that the stroke with the golf machine registers 200 yards. The compensating protractor 17 is moved along the scale 16 until the line indicating 200 yards on the' protractor 17 coincides with the mark indicating 20() yards on the scale 16. This point is indicated by the reference character C in Figs. 2 and 6. The area of the protractor lying between the line C and the rear edge B arbitrarily indicates the roll of the hall and consequently if during the roll the ball would encounter any trap, hazard or rough` it is assumed that its travel would be intercepted and the. ball would come to rest in any such hazard. trap or rough. In Fig. 6,' the area defined by the line C and the rear edge B ,ofthe protractor A17 covers a hazard 14 which in this particular instance, is av bunker. Obviously, therefore the ball will be presumed to have come to rest in the bunker and the players ball will therefore be moved from the tee to a position in this bunker.

iso

Gli

Lamai? W'hen it again becomes time for this ball to be played the scale is placed with the notch 21 in engagemeiit with the ball and the scale laid in the direction of the hole, the same procedure being adhered to as just described.

When the area defined by the rear edge B of the protractor and the line indicating the yardage does not cover any hazard, trap or rough, the ball shall be conceded as having traveled the full distance and lshall be placed the full number of yards indicated on the golf machine.

In playing the game the Rules of Golf shall govern with however, the following qualifications which for the purpose of simplicity will herein be separately designated.

(a) If the players ball comes to rest in a sand trap, the golf machine is not used for the next shot, but the ball is placed by the player 50 yards in any desired direction. This shall count one stroke. Exception VVhen the sand trap is Within the minimum distance circle, (see Putting Green Rules.)

(b) If a players ball comes to rest in any other hazard it must be dro 'ped out by the player with the usual pena ty as set forth in the Rules of Golf.

(c) If the players ball reaches the rough, 25 yards will be deducted from the length of that stroke as registered on the golf machine, provided that 25 yards does not bring the ball back into the fairway, in which case the ball will be brought back toward the tee but left in the edge of therough.

(d) On any stroke pla ed from the rough the player will deduct a istance of 50 yards from that stroke as registered on the golf machine and the protractor placed accordingly. Exception :--For strokes n ot in excess of 150 yards full distance will be allowed and must be taken by the player except that in no case will the ball be conceded as coming within No. 3 circle (see Putting Green Rules.) In case the ball should come within No. 3 circle from such a shot, it shall be placed on No. 3 circle and played accordinrl tiel) F or topped shots the whole area or" the protractor shall be conceded as arbitrarily designatinv the roll and probable accuracy and the line z Y on the protractor shall be placed on the yardage line on the scale as indicated by the golf machine.

For each succeeding shoththe above procedure must be followed until the ball shall come to rest within the minimum distance circle.

While l have set forth hereinbefore a set of arbitrary rules to be used in connection with the recognized Rules of Golf, it should be understood that these rules are sug estive only and are set forthv solely as an ilustrative example of arbitrary qualifications deduced after actual experiment.

F or the government of procedure around each -hole l have as hereinb'efore mentioned described a plurality of circles, four of which are denominated No. 1, No. 2, No. 3 and No. 4 and which represent distances of 5, 10, 15 and 20 feet from the hole respectively. 'llhere is also described a larger circle denominated Minimum distance circle which arbitrarily represents the minimum distance that the golf machine will register accurately.

lll/hen therefore a players ball comes to rest within the minimum distance circle and when it is found convenient to employ a putting carpet and putting cup, the following Putting Green Rules obtain:

(g) lf a players ball comes to rest within the minimum distance circle on or oif the green but outside No. 4 circle, not in rough or sand trap, count one stroke, place ball on No. 2 circle and put out from the lOfoot mark on the putting carpet.

(h) If a players ball comes to rest in any sand trap or rough within the minimum distance circle but outside No. 4 circle, count one stroke, place ball on No. 4 circle and put out from 20 foot mark on putting carpet.

. (z') If layers ball is in any trap inside No. 4 circ e, placeon No. 3 circle, count one stroke and put out on putting carpet from 15 foot mark.

(j) llf players ball is within No. 4 circle but not on the green, count one stroke and place on No.y 1 circle and put out on putting carpet from 5 foot mark.

(k) Whenever the ball is actually played on the golf machine from without the minimum distance circle and comes to, rest within No. 4, No. 3, No. 2 or No. 1 circle on green, place ball on nearest circle line without counting a stroke and put out on putting carpet from corresponding distance on the caret. e p In connection with the foregoing set of rules it is assumed that suiiicient room is available to use a 20'foot putting carpet di vided into four spaces of 5 feet each. However, where it is impractical to use a putting carpet of this length a smaller putting carpet may be used the same results being obtained by dividing the same into tour equal parts, these divisions corresponding to the rst tour circles described around the hole on the course.

rllhe manner in which the game is played when the ball reaches the puttingr green will liti@ lll@ lll

be obvious from the foregoing rules and a conceded as holing out in three additional strokes.

(m) If ball comes to rest inside No. 2 circle, player will be conceded Ias holing out in one put.

(n) If ball comes to rest between No. 2 and No. l circle, player will be conceded as holing out in two puts.

(o) If ball comes to rest between4 minimum distance circle andy No. 4 circle, a player will be conceded as holing out in three additional strokes.

The foregoing rules which are employed when it is found inconvenient to use a putting carpet seem to describe the manner of playing the game when the ball reaches the putting greensufiiciently to dispense with the necessity of a further description herein;

rlhe compensating protractor 17 is used in connection with the scale 16 when a, golf machine is employed which does not distinctly show pulls and slicessuch for instance as shown in patent numbered 661,881. When however, a golf machine is usedsuch as shown in patent numbered 1,074,880, which designates distinctly pulls and slices the protractor 17 is used in connection with a scale 26 illustrated in Fig. 5. This scale has three columns of graduations 27, 27b and 27 arranged at an angle of 10o from one another, the line of raduations 27* indicating the pull line, t e line of graduations 27c representin the slice line while the line of graduations 27b represents a stroke which is not faulty in either one of these two respects. The compensating protractor 17 when used in connection with the scale26 is placed upon either one of the columns of graduations and moved along the same, in the same manner as described with reference to Fig. 2. The columns of graduations on the scale 26 are drawn to the same scale as the i course.

' he ball nmay be followed through the green and all ofthe technicalities of the game of golf made possible.

Obviously it is not necessary to furnish printsillustrating a complete 18V hole course but that a game employing three or six holes could be made, thereby producing* practically the same results at a considerable smaller expense. Obviously a print or chart representing one standard hole could be produced with a topography indicated thereon which would' enable the tee to be shifted to different locations, thereby maintaining the game complete as to details but materially reducing the concomitant expense of production.

I therefore expressly reserve the right to make such modifications and changes in the form of my improved game as will prove necessary and desirable and it should be furthermore understood' that the scale upon which the charts are produced may be likewise varied as I find desirable. Also the arbitrary rules hereinbe'fore set forth may likewise be changed and modied to enable the object of this game to be properly accomplished.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:

1. A game of the class described for use in connection with a golf machine comprising a playing field chart upon which is delineated a golf course, separate scale and protractor means for determining the position of a golf ball on said course corresponding to the stroke length registered on said golf machine, said protractor arbitrarily fixing the length of roll of the ball.

2. A game of the class described for use in connection with a golf machinev which registers the length of a stroke, said game comprising a playing field in the form of a golf course delineated upon a plurality ofcharts, each? chart representing one hole of the course, a scale and a protractor movable relatively thereto for determining the position of a golf ball on the course, the

distances being obtained from vthe length of stroke registered by the golf machine, said scale and protractor defining the roll of the ball for the particular length of stroke.

3. In a golf game a plurality of charts, each chart having delineatedthereon a golf course with the associated hazards, means embodying a scale and protractor for determining the position on said course of a golf ball after each stroke, said means delining the length of roll of the ball for the length of shot whereby hazards in the path of roll of a ball may be deemed to intercept the movement of said ball and bring the same to rest.

4. In a golf ame a chart upon which is delineated a p aying field representing a golf course, a scale for'measuring on said course the distance travelled by a golf ball, a protractor cooperating therewith for defining the length of roll of the' ball for each stroke, the hole of said course having described about the same a plurality of circles whereby areas are defined adjacent said hole in which prescribed putting rules preva1 5. A game of the class described for use in connection with a golf machine adapted to register the length of a stroke, said game including a chart having delineated thereon a playing field representing a golf course, alls .adapted to be placed in various positions on said playing field, a scale and protractor adapted to determine the position of a ball after each stroke on said machine,

the basis ot calculation being the length oi said stroke registered by said machine, said scale and protractor dening the length of' roll of the ball tor each length of stroke,v

'dening the distance from the holel 6. ln a game of the clam described a chart having delineated thereon a playing held representing a golf course, each hole oi said course being delineated upon a separate chart9 a plurality of balls adapted to be positioned at determinable places on said playing field, a scale drawn to the same scale as said playing tield9 a slidable protractor cooperating therewith, division marks on said protractor, said protractor being displaceable on said scale to can@ a selected division marl: to coincide with the division line on said scale representing the length of stroke, the distance between the coinciding mark on said protractor and the rear edge of the same dehning the length oi roll of the ball for that length ot stroke whereby the topography of the goil course may be considered as intercepting the roll of the hall,

7. A game apparatus of the class described9 for use in connection with a golf machine designed to register the length ol' a stroke and an indoor putting carpet and cup, comprising charts upon which are delineated a golf course representing the playing eld9 a scale and protractor correspond playing ield* and the playing held, one of said lines dening the minimum distance said golf machine will register? the remaining lines dening the distance ot the ball from the hole whereby the ball'may be correspondingly placed on the putt-ing carpet.

8. A aine apparatus ci the class described or use in connection with a golf machine desied 'to register the distance of a strolre and to register t pnlls l and slices, said apparatus embodying a chart having delineated thereon a playing field representative ot a golf course, a scale embodying three lines of angularly disposed 'graduationa two of said lines of gradaations representing a pull or slice stroke, and a protractor for use in connection with said scale, the protractor being adapted to be moved 'along' relatively t0 one oi' said lines ot gradnations .to deteine the position of the ball alter reach strolre on the ll machine, said protractor dehning the length ot roll ot the ball for each strolre.

WELS/@N MacRAE.

titi

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2489676 *Jun 10, 1946Nov 29, 1949Blain Holloway TSimulated golf game
US3399899 *Oct 18, 1965Sep 3, 1968Frank B. ShepherdGolf putting game
US3523689 *Apr 13, 1966Aug 11, 1970Brunswick CorpGolf game
US3885795 *Jan 28, 1974May 27, 1975Walter E BrewerGolf ball putting game
US3937466 *Feb 18, 1975Feb 10, 1976Candor James TMethod for playing strategy golf
US3949987 *Apr 25, 1974Apr 13, 1976Candor James TGolfer's aid
US4095797 *Apr 26, 1976Jun 20, 1978Breese Nicholas VGolf club swing training device
US4114888 *Apr 8, 1977Sep 19, 1978The Raymond Lee Organization, Inc.Golf tour game
US4743026 *Apr 15, 1986May 10, 1988Eady Gordon EGolf game
US4934704 *May 1, 1989Jun 19, 1990William MazerIndoor golf course
US6336875 *May 2, 2000Jan 8, 2002Ronald J. RiceFantasy golf game
US20130320622 *Jun 4, 2012Dec 5, 2013Joan TunnyGame for amusement and teaching
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/150
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/0005, A63F2250/1042
European ClassificationA63F3/00A4J