Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1471021 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 16, 1923
Publication numberUS 1471021 A, US 1471021A, US-A-1471021, US1471021 A, US1471021A
InventorsBeardsley imitation Parchment Board
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Imitation parchment board ahd method
US 1471021 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 16,1923. 1 1 1,471,021

- R. BEARDSLEY IMITATION PARCH MENT BOARD AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Filed March .1 5'. 1920 Patented @ct. 16, 1923.

snare rats ROBERT BEARDSLEY, 0F CHICAGQ, ILLINOIS.

I-MITATIQN PABCHMENT BOARD AND MEQHQD 0F MAKING THE SAME.

Application filed. llEaz-ch 15, mo. semi no. senate.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known thatl, Ronnn'r BnAnosLnY, a citizen of the United States, residing at Chicago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Imitation Parchment Board and Methods of Making the Same, of which the following is a description.

My invention belongs to that general class of products known as imitation parchment paper or board which will very closely resemble the natural parchment and the method of making the same. The invention has among its objects the production of a parchment substitute or board having the appearance of parchment, which is durable, efficient, attractive and inexpensive, and which may be used wherever found applicable. It also has among its object the production of said imitation parchment by a method that is simple, efiicient, convenient and satisfactory, which method will produce an imitation parchment of fine appearance, of great durability and strength, which may be satisfactorily employed in producing orna mented articles, such as shades, imitation flowers, and other attractive and useful articles. Many other objects of the invention and advantages of the same and uses of the production will be obvious to those skilled in the art from the disclosures herein given.

To this end my invention consists in the novel product, construction, and methods herein set forth and described, and more particularly pointed out in the claims.

In the drawings, wherein like reference characters indicate like or corresponding parts,

Fig. 1 represents a paper board cut to the shape of a leaf;

Fig. 2'represents said leaf after it has been ornamented or colored;

@Fig. 3 represents said ornamental leaf after it has been embossed;

Fig. 4: represents said embossed leaf after it has been treated with oil to make it translucent;

Fig. 5 represents the translucent leaf bent to shape; and

Fig. 6 represents the shaped leaf covered with a protective coatin In producing or manu act-uring the product, I prefer to use a high grade of paper, for example that made from rags, which is of fine texture, of great strength, and free and clear from defects. l 'he thickness or weight of the same, as well as the size, may be as desired, and if preferred, several sheets of the paper 1 and 2, as shown in Fig. 1, may be secured together by suitable glues, paste, or other'binders so as to produce a sheet of some thickness or body. It is immaterial, however, whether the same is built up or consists of one or more plies. The paper, either a single sheet or several plies, secured together to form substantially an integral sheet, is preferably suitably embossed or impressed so as to produce a leather or parchment efi'ect or it may be embossed to represent veins or the like, as at 3, the kind of embossing'depending upon the style of parchment which is to be reproduced. In some cases the embossing is omitted.

After the paper has been embossed, it may be given the parchment efi'ect, unless the same is to be first ornamented, or colored as at 4, as will be hereinafter described. The method of treatment consists in providing a suitable bath and dipping or immersing the paper therein or otherwlse applying the same to the paper, and thereafter drying the same. This particular treatment may be varied to some extent depending upon the use to which the product is to be put. preparing the product to be used for lamp shades or the like, 1 preferably dip or immerse the same in a bath ofboiled white linseed oil of suitable-temperature. In some cases Imake up the bath of suitable parts of boiled white linseed oil andwhite paraffin oil, the proportions of which may vary, thereby varying the products. I prefer to have the bath at a temperature in the nei hborhood of 270 degrees Fahrenheit, it being understood that the temperature, however, may vary so as to vary the product, and may be varied depending upon the proportions of linseed and paraffin referred to. After the same has been dipped in the hot bath, ll then prefer to dip the same into a cooler bath, which last mentioned bath may be of boiled linseed oil or the same kind of bath as previously used. After the same has been dipped or immersed in the cool bath, the imitation parchment or board is allowed to dry. If desired, after removing from the cold bath, the product may be squeegeed so as to remove the excess or surplus oil so as to shorten the required drying time. It may be mentioned that the cold bath seems to increase and hasten the penetration of the oils into the product and causing comiiiplete penetration or distribution. IVhile I have found very satisfactory results with linseed oils alone, the use of the white paraffin oil causes the product to be somewhat lighter in shade. The use of too much paraffin oil, however, is not desirable, as after a time the imitation parchment seems to lose some 'of its translucence and becomes more or less opaque in the course of time, the opaqueness seeming to gradually increase.

As is well known, genuine parchment is mottled or cloudy at points, which mottling is generally more or less irregular both in size, shape and location on the parchment. In order that the manufactured-parchment board or paper may closely follow the natural appearance of the parchment, I treat the same so as to produce the mottled appearance. This effect may be produced in any desired manner. I have found the following method very satisfactory for the purpose. I place an absorbent body on one side of the board, and then apply heat, as for example, by means of a flat iron,- or the equivalent, to the other side. The heat is applied in spots only, the iron being applied to some portions more than to others. some portions not being touched at all. The effeet is that the board where the iron has been applied is slightly opaque, as at 5 at least the same is not as translucent as where no heat has been applied, and the real parchment appearance is produced. The application of the hot iron apparently causes the withdrawal of a portion of the oil from the board so as to restore somewhat the original appearance in spots.

The board may be decorated or ornamented as desired, either before or after the oil treatment, this depending upon the use for which the same is to be put. I have found the imitation parchment particularly desirable and attractive foruse in the construction of lamp shades or the like, and when so used it is generally ornamented or decorated. The ornamentation may be put on before or after treatment, and in some cases a portion is put on before and a portion after. I have found that in making lamp shades in many cases it is preferred to out the imitation parchment to the desired shape and then paint or ornament the same before treatment. When ornamented before treatment, I have found that I may use water colors, which may be applied as desired. When the ornamented shade or irnitation parchment board is then dipped er treated in the bath, the bath sets the coiors without detracting from or affecting the color values. The colors are so set that shade or board, after treatment, may be dusted, wiped off, or even washed without injury. If it is desired to place an additional colors such as a background or any other desired color, this may be done after treatment, generally after the mottling, but in this case I prefer to use a color with a carrier that will penetrate or temporarily out the oil so that the color will set, as for illustration, if a color containing alcohol is applied the oil on the imitation parchment will be temporarily cut to permit the penetration and retention of the color, but the alcohol will quickly evaporate, without in any way affecting the imitation parchment. Various finishes such as gold powder, gold leaf or silver or the like may be applied and this is ordinarily all applied after treatment.

In making up the shades, the same may be formed as desired. If it is desired to secure different pieces together, they may be so secured by a suitable binder, such as glue or the equivalent, but I prefer to scrape or feather the edges that come together as the binder will be more eflicient if the meeting faces are so scraped or roughened. Various metal or other frames, braid and the like, may be employed in making up the shade.

Vhcre the imitation parchment is used for the making of flowers or like decorative articles, I use a paper similar to that previously described, with one or more plies, as shown in Fig. 1. The same may be embossed or not, as desired, but in this case it may be mentioned that some may be embossed to represent lines or veins, as at 3, or to give a roughened surface. In the case of flowers, however, it is generally preferred to have a substantially smooth surface and to have the material entirely translucent Without any opaque portions. It is obvious that the oilwithdrawing step is omitted when the mottled effect is not desired. The paper is cut to shape, for example, so as to form petals, leaves or the like, by means of suitable dies or the equivalent, and the same is then painted with water colors or the equivalent. so as to produce the desired tints or colors, as at 4. The same are then formed with suitable diesso as to appear like the natural petal or part. In the case of leaves, during the-formlng the veins may-beembossed or impressed in, so that they appear very natural. After forming, the same are treated. While the same may be given the same treat ment as that previously described, I generally prefer to dip the same into a pure white linseed oil bath or a paraffin bath, and at a somewhat higher temperature than that previously described. In most cases for flowers I do not use the parafhn oil but the linseed oil aione. omit the cold or cooler bath previously described. I have found that very desirable results may be obtained by using a bath at approximately 300 degrees Fahrenheit, or more. This is, however, a matter of preference.

After trimming, draining, and drying, the flower parts are assembled and made up similar to other artificial flowers. It is not considered necessary herein to describe the assembling.

practice as a very satisfactory method of making the board or paper.

Having thus described my invention, it' is obvious that various immaterial modifications may be made in the same without departing from the spirit of my invention; hence I do not wish to be understood as limiting myself to the exact form, construction, arrangement and combination of parts herein shown and described or uses men,- tioned.

\Vhat I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

. tire body thereof.

1. A board of the kind described, comprising a sheet of suitable paper material impregnated with an oil throughout the en parts of said impregnate'd material being rendered translucent and other parts rendered opaque, and said translucent and opaque portions being of irregular shape and arrangement.

9. A method of producing imitation parchment board consisting in impregnating paper board with oil and thence withdrawing a portion of the oil in spots to produce a mottled efiect.

3. A method of producing imitation parchment board consisting in building up a board of a plurality of like paper sheets and applying an oil to the paper board and thence treating the board-to produce a mottlcd effect.

.4. A method of producing imitation parchment board consisting in embossing the board and then applying an oil to the board to impregnate the same and thence witlulrawinp a portion of the oil to produce a mottled eflec 5. A method of producing imitation parchment board consisting in immersing paper board in a bath of suitable material to impregnate the same therewith, and thence withdrawing a portion of said material to produce a mottled effect.

6. A method of producing imitation parchment boardconsisting in embossing paper board and immersing the board in a.

heated oil bath to impregnate the same and thence withdrawing a portion of the oil to produce a mottled efiect.

7. A method of making imitation parchment board consisting in building up a paper board with a plurality of plies of paper, and thence embossing the same, thence successively treating the same to an application of a hot oil followed by an application of cold oil, and thence allowing to 8. A method of making imitation parchment board consisting in buildingup a paper board with a plurality of plies of paper and thence embossing the same, thence successively treating the same to an application of a hot oil immediately followed by an application of cold oil and thence'allowing to dry, and thereafter withdrawing a portion of the'oil in spots to produce a mottled efi'ect.

9. A method of making imitation parchment board consisting in embossing paper board; thence successively treating the same to an application of a hot oil immediately followed by an application of cold oil and thence allowing to dry, and thereafter withdrawing a portion of the oil to produce a mottled effect.

V 10. A method of making imitation parchment board consisting in building up a body consisting of a plurality of plies of paper, thence embossing said body to produce the desired effect, thence immersing the same in a hot bath of White boiled linseed oil and white paraliin oil at a temperature of approximately 270 degrees and thereafter immediately immersing the same in a bath of cold boiled white linseed oil,

11. A method of making imitation parchment board consisting in building up a body consisting of a plurality of plies of paper,- thencc embossing said bodyto produce the desired effect, thence immersing the same in a hot bath of White boiled linseed oil and white paraliinpil at ,a'temperature of above 250 degrees, and thereafter immediately immersing the samein a bath of cold boiled white linseed oil, thence drying the body, and thereafter applying a hot iron to one side in spots and an absorbent body on the other side of the board whereby a mottled effect is produced.- i

12. A method of making imitation parchment board consisting in immersing paper board in a hot bathofwhite boiled linseed oil and'white paraffin oil at a temperature of approximately 270 degrees and thereafter immediately immersing the same in a bath of cold oil, and thereafter applying a hot bodyon one side in spots and an absorbent body on the other side of the board whereby a mottled effect is produced.

13, A method of making imitation parchment board consisting in embossing paper board to produce the desired effect, thence immersing the same in a hot bath of substantially equal parts whiteboiled linseed oil and white paraffin oil at a temperature above 200 degrees Fahrenheit, and thereafter immediately immersing the same in a bath of cold boiled white linseed oil. thence drying the board and thereafter applying heat on one side in spotsand an absorbent body on the other side of the board, whereby a mottled effect is produced.

14. A niethod of producing ornamented imitation parchment board. consisting in cutting paper board to shape and ornamenting with water colors, thence immersing the board in a hot bath consisting of white boiled linseed oil and white paraffin oil, the proportionate parts of paraffin oil being less than the linseed'oil, at a temperature greater than 200 degrees, thence immediately immersing the same in a cold bath containing white boiled linseed oil, thence drying the board, and thereafter applying a hot body to one side of the board in spots and an absorbent body to the other side of the board to withdraw a portion of the oil and produce a mottled effect, thence applyiing a suitable stain and thence allowing t l5. A method of producing ornamented imitation parchment board consisting in cutting paper board to shape and ornamenting with water colors, thence immersing the board in a hot bath consisting of white boiled linseed oil and white paraffin oil, the proportionate parts of paraflin oil being less than the linseed oil, at a temperature greater than 200 degrees, thence immediately immersing t e same in a cold bath containing white boiled linseed oil and white parafiin oil, thence d ing the board, and thereafter applying a llot body to one side' of the board in spots and an absorbent body to the other side of the board ,tolwithdraw a portion of the oil and produce a mottled effect, thence applying a suitable stain pro vided with a carrier that will temporarily cut the oil, and thence allowing to dry.

16. A method of producing ornamented imitation parchment board consisting in em bossing a paper board,thenee cutting to shape and ornamenting with colors, thence immersing the board in a hot bath consisting of White-boiled linseed oil and white paraffin oil of substantially equal arts, at a temperature of approximately 2 0 degrees, thence immediately immersing the same in a cold bath of white boiled linseed oil and white paraffin oil, thence drying the board, and thereafter applying a hot body to one side of the board in spots and an absorbent body to the other, side of the board to withdraw a portion of the oil and produce a mottled effeet, thence applying a suitable stain provided with a carrier that will temporarily out the oil, and thence allowing to dry.

17. A method of producing ornamented ature of approximately 270 degrees, thence immediately immersing the same-in a cold bath containin white boiled linseed oil, thence drying t aboard, and thereafter applying a hot body to one side of the boardin spots and an absorbent body to the other side of the board to Withdraw a portion of .the oil and produce a mottled effect, thence applying a suitable alcohol stain that will temporarily out the oil and allow the fixing of the color.

18. Amethod of producing articles of imitation parchment board, consisting in emboss: ing paper boards, ornamenting them, shaping them, treating them with oil, and then applying a protective coating to the product.

19. A method of producing articles of imitation parchment board, consisting in embossing paper boards, ornamenting them, shaping them, treating them with oil, assembling the parts to form the desired product. and then applying a protective coating to the assembled product.

20. A method of producing articles of imitation parchment, consisting in embossing paper boards, ornamenting-them, shaping each of the ornamented boards, treating them with oil to render them translucent, assembling the individual parts into the desired product, and then coating the assembled product with a protective varnish.

21. A method of making paper board consisting in successively treating a paper base material with an application of a hot oil followed by an application of a cold oil.

22. A method of making paper board consisting in successively immersing paper in hot oil followed by cold oil, and thence allowing to dry.

23. A method of making translucent paper board consisting in building up the.

board with sheets of paper to the desired size and shape, thence applying a hot oil bath thereto followed by a cooler oil bath, and thence allowing to dry.

2A. A method of making translucent paper board consisting in building up the board with sheets of paper to the desired size and shape, thence applying a hot vegetable oil bath thereto followed by a cooler vegetable oil bath, and thence allowing to dry.

In testimony whereof, I have-hereunto signed my name in the'presence of two subscribing witnesses.

ROBERT BEARD SLEY. Witnesses ROY W. HILL, BERTHA HARTMANN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2419271 *Jun 8, 1944Apr 22, 1947Henry LishGas heated embossing press
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/76, 428/17, 106/265
Cooperative ClassificationD21H5/08