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Publication numberUS1472270 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 30, 1923
Filing dateMar 29, 1920
Priority dateMar 29, 1920
Publication numberUS 1472270 A, US 1472270A, US-A-1472270, US1472270 A, US1472270A
InventorsHarshberger Norman P
Original AssigneeTee Lok Shingle Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shingle
US 1472270 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

N. P. HARSHBER'GER SHINGLE Filed March 29. 1920 HH H #LHHH.

Fey. 4

Patented Oct. 30, 1923.

UNITED STATES y NORMAN P. HARSHBERGER, OF Cl/EICAGO, ILLINOIS, ASSIGNOR TO TEE-LOK SHINGLE COMPANY, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, A CORPORATION OF ILLINOIS.

SHINGLE.

Application led March 29, 1920. Serial No. 369,801.

To all whom zt may concern:

Be it known that I, NORMAN P. HARSH- BERGER, a citizen of the United States, residing at Chicago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Shingles, of which the following is a specification.l

This invention relates to Shingles for covering roofs, and has for its object the production of suitable shingles for the purpose, the Shingles being so formed that the exposed parts thereof may be locked by the adjacent shingles in such a manner that,J it iS impossible. for any portion of the exposed parts to be turned up by the wind or by warping or in any other manner. Another object of the invention is to provide shingles of such a sha-pe that they may be cut from Strips of material in such a manner that there is substantially no waste whatever in forming the shingles. Another object of the invention is to provide shingles of such shape, that the appearance of the roof, after having been covered by the shingles. w-ill be pleasing to the eye. A further object is to provide Shingles of such shape and laid in such a manner that they will so lap over each other as to form a very effective water proof coat for the roof. Other objects of the invention will appear from a consideration of the accompanying drawings and the following description thereof.

Of the drawing Fig. 1 is a plan view of a single shingle. in its completed shape; Fig.

2 is a diagram indicating the manner in which the shingles are cut from a long strip without any material waste; Fig. 3 indi- Cates the manner in which the shingles are laced together in forming the roof; Fig. 4 is a plan view of a plurality of shingles properly assembled on the roof; and Fig. 5 is anedge view of the shingles of F 1g. 4.

It is common to make Shingles out of various Substances which4 have been formed into sheets, and which are impregnated with preserving and water proof substances. So far as Inv invention is concerned the material of which mv shingles is composed is immaterial, as well as the substance which impregnates or coats the same; but I prefer for the purpose substances which may 'be formed into sheets or long strips, and then may be conveniently cut by means of diesl or otherwise into individual units, and whlch lare to be applied to the roof in general in a manner somewhat similar to the ordinary manner of applying such shingles. Shingles made in this manner when applied to the roof, being more or less pliable, the exposed portions of the shingles are some times blown upwardly by the Wind, or are other wise bent out of shape, and the consequence 1s that the appearance of the roof is objectionable. and the protection of the roof is more or less diminished. The portion of the shingle which is thus deformed, iS usually the portion which proiects below the overlying upper shingles, and, in order to prevent this deformation, I provide means for locking the lower ends of the shingles to the adjacent shingles.

In general the shingles which I provide are T shaped and comprise a main or top portion l0 with a projecting or shank p0rtion 11, the shank portion being that portion which overlies the adjacent shingles and the top portion being covered by the adjacent shingles. As the shank 11 is thus the exposed portion, and the portion most likely to become deformed, I provide tongues or lugs 12 on the lower edges of the Shanks 11, and these lugs are adapted to slip under the Shoulders 20 of the adjacent shingles, as indicated in Fig. 4. In order to lock these lugs 12 to the roof by the adjacent shingles I provide slots 13, arranged so that the lugs 12 of each shingle may pass through the slots of the adjacent Shingles. For instance, in laying the shingles the units 14l and l5 (Fig. 4) are first laid and the unit 16 then has one of its 4 lugs 12 locked under the shingle 14 and the other lug locked under the shingle 15 in the following manner: The lower end 17 of the shingle 16 is of such length and width that it passesl into the space formed between the two shingles 14 and 15; and the lugs 12 may then pass under the shoulders- 20 of the underlying Shingles 14 and 15.; and the shingle 16 then may be pulled upwardly, the lugs 12 passing through the slots 1 3 of the underlying shingles, so that when the shingle 16 is pulled upwardly to its proper place it will occupy the position indicated in Fig. 4 with reference to the underlying shingles 14 and 15 and its lugs 12 are then locked firmly in place by means of the Shanks 11 of the shingles 14 and 15.

Referring to Fig. 4 it will be seen that the exposed portion of each of the shingles forms a uar'e like figure 21, the inclined sides of w ich are more or less regular, so that the appearance of the roof as a whole, while symmetrical, is not painfully plain, but presents a very pleasm appearance. This appearance is increase by the fact that, as is indicated in Fig. 5, the lower edge of each of the exposed portions in flush with the lower edges of 'the main portions 10 of the two adjoining shingles,so that there 1s a double butt portion 22 formin in each case the lower edge of the expose portion; and this gives to the` roof the ordinary double butt arrangement of shingles, and thus improves the appearance by iving a. decided line of demarcation along t e lower edge of the shingle. Further it will be noticed that in laying the shingles in the manner described, when any portion of the roof covering is completed, the lapping of the shingles over the various edges is such that there is no probability of moisture working through to the roof, as the lapping is very material in each case, and comprises, so far as each inclined edge is concerned, a double lapping thereof.

ttention is called to the fact that, although I have shown and described vari ous details of the particular shape of the shingles, particularly with reference to the shank portions 11 yet, in general, the shingle comprises merely a rectangular top portion 10 with a rectangular shank 11 attached thereto in the form of a T; and the laying of the shingles, ex'cept for the lockingsthereof and the appearance thereof, is su tantially the same as if plain rectangular T-shaped shingles were used without the locking means. And it will further be noticed that the cutting out of the individual units from the strips of material, whether the plain or the locking units are used, can be, performed without an waste of material, by cutting out the umts substantially as indicated in Fig. 2. With. particular reference to the exact form indicated in Fig. 1 it will be seen that the lugs 12 of one shingle are formed by cutting out the recesses 18 of the adjacent shingles, the dimensions of the lugs in the recesses being similar, and the portions 11 as a whole are formed by cuttingout the lar e corners from the adjacent shingles. o that there is no waste of material so far as cutting out of the units as a whole is concerned. The material cutout from the slots 13, however, is not made use of so far as the shingles themselvesV are concerned. In general the shape of the shingle is such that they may be readily cut from long stripsof material, and hence are easily and cheaply manufactured, and at the same time they may be laid so asto' form a very leasing and efective covering for the roo and Yone in which the shingles will not become deformed by any ordlnary means.

Although my invention may be carried out with shingles of other relative dimensions, yet the relative dimensions which I prefer are as follows: The length of the top portion 10 is twice the distance hetween the inner edges of the slots, or twice the average width of the shank, measured on a line parallel with the top; and the width of the trg) is twice the length of the shank or the istance the shank projects awa from the to as is indicated by Fig. 1. e length o each lug 12 is equal to the length of each recess 18; and the length of the outer end of the shank'including the two lugs, is twice the distance from the edge of the shank where it joins the top to the adjacent end of the top.

l claim as my invention:

1. An article of manufacture comprising a T-shaped shin le having a top and an integral shank, t e dimensions of the top being substantially twice the average corresponding or parallel dimensions of the shank, the shank comprising lugs projecting from its outer end.

2. An article of manufacture comprising a T-sha d shingle having a top and an integral s ank, the-dimensions of the top being substantially twice (the average corresponding or parallel dimensions of the shank, the shank comprising lugs projecting from its outer end, the said Shanks projecting from the tops substantially twice the corresponding or parallel d1- mensions of the lu 3. A plurality o shin les, each comprising a top and an integra shank, the shank projecting from the centralportion of one edge of the top and a lug projecting from each side of the outer end of said shank, and a slot in the edge of said top adjacent each edge of said shank which connects to the top, each of said lugs adapted to pass into a slot of an adjoining shingle when laid on a roof.

4. A plurali-ty of shingles, each comprising a body portion, a projecting portion' having a slot in its edge, the said lug being positioned so that when properly laid on a roof it will enter a slot in an adjacent shingle, whereby the projecting portion will be locked down on the roof by the body portion. Y

5. A plurality of shingles, each comprising a top and a shank, the shank projecting from one edge of the top, and a lug projecting from each side of said shank, each of said shingles having transverse slots into which enter the lugs of the adjacent shingles, whereby said lugs are locked down.

6. A shingle, comprising a substantially lll flat bod portion, a shank in the plane of.

said bo y portion and projecting outward from one edge-thereof, said shank having locking tongues on opposite sides of the 'same and extending laterally outward therefrom, and said body portion having locking slots on opposite sides of said shank at the base thereof.

7. A shingle, comprising a substantially flat rectangular body portion, a shank in the plane of said body portion, and projecting outward from one side edge thereof between the end edges of the same, said shank having locking tongues on opposite sides of the same and extending laterally outward therefrom, and said body portion having lockin slots on opposite sides of said shank at the ase ,thereof and opening through the adjacent edge of said body portion.

8. A roof, comprising a plurality of shingles, said shingles having lookin tongues and slots for interlocking the shingles together, the 'tongues becomin engaged with the slots on moving the shlngles with the tongues relatively to the shingles with the `slots in directions to cause the tongues to enter the slots.

9. A plurality of shingles, arranged with two shingles end to end and in the same plane, a third shin le laid on said two shingles, said third shingle extending over the '0in-t between said two shingles and overapping the latter on opposite sides of said joint, said shingles having locking tongues and slots on opposite sides of said joint, the 35 same plane, a third shingle laid on said two 45 shingles, said third shingle extending over the joint between said two shingles and overlapping the latter on opposite sides of said joint, said third shingle having tongues on its shank on opposite sides thereof, and said two shingles having slots at the bases of their shanks to receive said ton ues upon movin the third shingle relativy to said two s ingles in a direction to cause said ton ues to enter said slots for interlocking sai shingles together.

11. A roof com rising a lurality of pliable shingles, sai shingles avin slots extending in a direction substantia y up and down the roof and a part of the lower portion of each shingle extending through a slot in' the adjacent lower shingle, whereby the lower edges of the shingles are locked down by the adjacent lower shingles.

u In testimony whereof, l hereunto set my 65 hand.

NURMAN P. HARSHBERGER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2437874 *Jun 7, 1945Mar 16, 1948Elam L BlackShingle
US5369929 *Feb 1, 1994Dec 6, 1994Elk Corporation Of DallasLaminated roofing shingle
US5611186 *Nov 30, 1994Mar 18, 1997Elk Corporation Of DallasLaminated roofing shingle
US5666776 *Aug 30, 1995Sep 16, 1997Elk Corporation Of DallasFor enhancing the appearance of depth of the shingle
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/525, D25/139
International ClassificationE04D1/12, E04D1/22
Cooperative ClassificationE04D1/22
European ClassificationE04D1/22