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Publication numberUS1473349 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 6, 1923
Filing dateApr 1, 1921
Priority dateApr 1, 1921
Publication numberUS 1473349 A, US 1473349A, US-A-1473349, US1473349 A, US1473349A
InventorsKach Robert
Original AssigneeKach Robert
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gas mixer
US 1473349 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 6 1923. 1,473,349

y R. KAcH GAS MIXER Filed April i. 1921 GOGO /r OOG@ AMW# ffaw Patented ov. V6, i923.

ROBERT xacn, or PORTLAND, OREGON.

' GAs MIXER.

T 0 all uff/tom t may concer/1t.

Be it known that I, Romair-'r Knorr, a citizen ofthe United vStates of America, and resident of Portland, in the county of Multnomah, in the State of Oregon, have invented certain new kand useful Gas Mixers, of which the following is a specification, reference being had to the accompanying drawinfr.

tMy invention relates to gas mixers for internal combustion engines, and has for its object the production of such a mixer in which special means are provided for the breaking up and mixing of gasoline without interruption of its volume of flow. v

It is recognized in the art that much of the gasoline that is now being used is of a lon7 grade, and that Athe charge thereof in passing from the carbureter to the engine contains, particularly in cold weather, particles of fuel that have not been properly broken up and mixed. 'Ihe result is incomplete combustion. with attendant evils, which, though well understood in the art, it has not been practicable to remedy to a satisfactory degree, and by means that have.

proved to be altogether practicable and eiiicient. Y

In devices for the purposes indicated, it is important that they be at the same time eiiicient for breaking up and mixing of all particles of the fuel, and that theyoperate without checking the volume of iiow thereof. In both of these respects the efficiency of my mixer has been amply demonstrated.

What constitutes myr invention is hereinafter specified in detail and is succinctly set forth in the appended claims.

In the accompanying drawing,

Figure I is a'top plan view ofan engine intake manifold and carbureter discharge pipe, showing my mixer chamber, with cover removed, introduced into Vthe pipe between the carbureter and the manifold. Y

Figure II is a side elevation, partly in vertical section, of the subject matter of Figure Iv` and with a suitable form of cover for the mixer chamber, in section and in place. Y

Figure III is a side elevation of the last of aseries of mixer baffle-plates. detached.

Figure IV is a similar view of the intermediate baHie-plate of said series, detached.

Figure V is a similar view of the primary baiiie-plate of said series, detached.

Referring to the numerals on the drawing,

l indicates an example of the intake manifold of an engine, notV shown, 2 the plateV of a carbureter, not shown, and 3 aV pipe of suitable capacity, that operatively unites the members l and 2, in any usual-manner of assemblage, such, for example, as the mutual relationship shown in the drawing.

In the body of the pipeV 3,- or at any convenient point of location between the carbureter and the manifold, is p-rovided a mixer chamber 4, that is preferablyof substantially rectangular shape in cross-section, and

of a calculated greater Acapacity* than that of the pipe 8 into which itis introduced.

The chamber 4 is provided, in a wall thereof preferably on top, with an opening 5, that Y is, in service, tightly'closed by a suitable cover, preferably that shown in the drawing and indicated by the numeral 6. The

cover, fitting within the frame of the opening 5, is provided with suitable means, for example, lateral flanges 7 for securing the cover in place. Through apertures in said flanges are introduced tap-screws' 8, that are threaded into screw-holes 8provided -for them in the frame of the Opening 5.

Within the chamber 4 is assembled a series comprising a` plurality,saythree, of

metallic baflie-plates, 9, 10, and Vl1.4 rIhe Y plate 9, of the series illustrated, is termed the primary baffle-plate; the plate l0, is termed an intermediate baffle-plate and the plate 11 the last.-baiiie-pl'ate, they beingso designatedV to indicatetheirrelative order of arrangementtowards the carburetor, whose locationis indicated by the carbureter-plate 2.

The'several plates 9,10, and 11, snugly fit the interior of the chamber 4, lling also, respectively, theV spaces provided forthem between the bottom l2, of the chamber 4v and the inside of its cover member V6, which serves, besides closing the chamber 4. to

'confine said plates in place therein. The

element 6 is designated a cover member, bey cause it maycomprise more than the single plate illustrated, as the present preferred form. The plates 9 and 11 are aligned at top and bottom, respectively, and are firmly mounted within the interior ofthe chamber 4 as by buttresses v15 and 16, there being an opposing pair ofbuttresses in the top and bottom walls, respectively,of the cham- Y ber. The plates 9 and 11 are provided, re-

spectively, with lateral flanges 17 and 18,

whose width is such that, when set in place within the chamber 4, as shown in Figure l, they aord, between their opposing edges, just enough space to admit between them, the intermediate plate l0, which is a flat plate, its opposite sides being flush, without flanges.

It was specified above that the capacity of the chamber 4f is calculated so as to exceed that of the pipe 3 into which it is introduced. The difference in the relative capacities of said members is such as to permit of the accommodation in the several plates 9, l0, and ll, of series of apertures, the sum of the areas of each seiies of apertures being substantially equal to the crosssectional area of the pipe 3. By the means just described, provision is made for the passage of gas through the pipe 3 without any interruption of the volume of its flow by reason of the presence of such plates, as, for instance, those exemplified in the plates 9, i0, and ii. l

Moreover, by providing said plates severally with a different number or arrangement of apertures, with variation of both number and arrangement, the gas, in passing through the plates 9, l0 and l1, derives therefrom an increased breaking up and mixing effect.

The variation of the number of apertures in the several bathe-plates of a series effects a distinctly staggered relative arrangement of those apertures in successive assembled plates, whereby a new and useful mixing effect upon the gas in flowing through them is gained.

In the series composed of three ba'liieplates, as illustrated, the plate 9 is, by preference, provided with a group of four apertures 20, the plate l() with a group of nine apertures 2l, and the plate 1l with a. group of sixteen apertures 22. It is repeated that each of said groups of apertures is equal in area to the cross-sectional area of the pipe 3, whereby varying deflection of the iiow of gas through them successively is effected without interruption of the'volume of its liow.

The operation of my mixer will be, it is believed, apparent to one skilled in the art, without further description thereof.

`What l claim is:

l. A gas mixer of the kind specified, comprising the combination with a pipe, and a mixer chamber therein having, as set forth, a relatively greater capacity than the pipe, of a series of ballie-plates in said chamber each plate having a group of apertures in it, the individui apertures of each plate being disaligned from those of the next adjacent plates, the area of each group being substantially equal to the cross-sectional area of the pipe.

2. A gas mixer of the kind specified, coinprising the combination with a pipe, and a mixer chamber therein having, as set forth, a relatively greater capacity than the pipe, of a series of baffle-plates in said chamber each plate having a group of apertures in it, the area of each group being substantially equal to the cross-sectional area of the pipe, and each group being composed of a greater number than the group of a preceding plate of the series.

3. A gas mixer of the kind specified, comprising the combination with a pipe, and a mixer chamber therein having, as set forth, a relatively greater capacity than the pipe, and having an opening in a wall thereof, of a series of apertured baille-plates firmly mounted within said chamber, a cover member within said opening and applied against the edges of said plates to hold them in place, and means for fastening the cover member in place and closing said openino'.

il. A gas mixer of the kind specified, comprising the combination with a pipe', and a mixer chamber therein, having, as set forth, a relatively greater capacity than the pipe, and having an opening in a wall thereof, of a series of apertured baffle-plates rmly mounted within said chamber, a cover member fitting said opening and applied against the edges of said plates to hold them in place, and means for fastening the cover member in place and closing said opening, a portion of said plates of the series having lateral flanges being adapted to Confine the remainder of the series in place, substantially as set forth.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

RQBERT KACH. Witnesses JOSEPH L. ATKINS, LEIcEsTER B. ATKiNs.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4031875 *Sep 15, 1975Jun 28, 1977Tyler Darwin AFuel vaporizer
US4067361 *Apr 21, 1976Jan 10, 1978The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavySilent self-controlled orificial restrictor
US4171332 *Dec 8, 1977Oct 16, 1979Walther GohnertFuel-air mixer for carburetors
US4628890 *Aug 31, 1984Dec 16, 1986Freeman Winifer WFuel atomizer
US5495872 *Jan 31, 1994Mar 5, 1996Integrity Measurement PartnersFlow conditioner for more accurate measurement of fluid flow
US5529093 *Mar 24, 1995Jun 25, 1996Integrity Measurement PartnersFlow conditioner profile plate for more accurate measurement of fluid flow
US6494105May 7, 1999Dec 17, 2002James E. GallagherMethod for determining flow velocity in a channel
US6851322Nov 13, 2002Feb 8, 2005Savant Measurement CorporationMethod and apparatus for determining flow velocity in a channel
US7303046Jul 12, 2005Dec 4, 2007Savant Measurement CorporationApparatus for filtering ultrasonic noise within a fluid flow system
US7303047Jul 12, 2005Dec 4, 2007Savant Measurement CorporationApparatus for filtering ultrasonic noise within a fluid flow system
US7303048Jul 12, 2005Dec 4, 2007Savant Measurement CorporationMethod for filtering ultrasonic noise within a fluid flow system
US7845688Apr 4, 2007Dec 7, 2010Savant Measurement CorporationMultiple material piping component
US8307943 *Jul 7, 2011Nov 13, 2012General Electric CompanyHigh pressure drop muffling system
US8430202Jan 11, 2012Apr 30, 2013General Electric CompanyCompact high-pressure exhaust muffling devices
US8511096Apr 17, 2012Aug 20, 2013General Electric CompanyHigh bleed flow muffling system
US8550208Apr 23, 2012Oct 8, 2013General Electric CompanyHigh pressure muffling devices
US9399951Apr 17, 2012Jul 26, 2016General Electric CompanyModular louver system
US20030131667 *Nov 13, 2002Jul 17, 2003Gallagher James E.Method and apparatus for determining flow velocity in a channel
US20060006022 *Jul 12, 2005Jan 12, 2006Savant Measurement CorporationApparatus for filtering ultrasonic noise within a fluid flow system
US20060011412 *Jul 12, 2005Jan 19, 2006Savant Measurement CorporationApparatus for filtering ultrasonic noise within a fluid flow system
US20060011413 *Jul 12, 2005Jan 19, 2006Savant Measurement CorporationMethod for filtering ultrasonic noise within a fluid flow system
WO1996017164A1 *Aug 25, 1995Jun 6, 1996Alan Fraser SimpsonFuel vaporisation apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification48/189.4, 138/40
International ClassificationF02M1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02M2700/4376, F02M1/00
European ClassificationF02M1/00