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Publication numberUS1474423 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 20, 1923
Filing dateDec 27, 1922
Priority dateDec 27, 1922
Publication numberUS 1474423 A, US 1474423A, US-A-1474423, US1474423 A, US1474423A
InventorsMaynard Joseph S
Original AssigneeRichardson Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of applying felt insulation
US 1474423 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' Nova 20, 1923.

' 1,474,423 J. s. MAYNARD METHOD OF APPLYING FELT INSULATION Filed Dec. .27, 1922 LLnoZewm/ ASP/Lilli ASP/7L2 Patented Nov. 20, 11923.

UNHTEE STATES Wa e earaar eerie.

JOSEPH S. MAYNARD, OF CINCINNATI, OHIO, ASSIGNOR TO THE RICHARDSON COM- lANY, 03F LOCKLAND, OHIO, A CORPORATION OF OHIO.

METHOD OF APPLYING FELT INSULATION.

Application filed December 27, 1922. Serial No. 609,318.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, JOSEPH S. MAYNARD, a. citizen of the United States, and a resident of Cincinnati. in the county of Hamils'ton and State of Ohio, have invented certain new and useful Im rovements in Methods of Applying Felt? the following is a full, clear, and exact description, reference being had to the accom-.

panying drawings, forming part of this specification.

My invention relates to methods of ap plying sound deadening felts and weather insulating felts and more particularly to the useof deadening felts with linoleum or other floor coverings in connection with their application.

Felt insulation is now produced in a form in which the web of felt of considerable thickness is coated in a machine on one or both sides with a layer of asphalt. This layer is applied in usual'prac'tice by flowing onto the felt the molten asphalt and then squeezing off the excess not desired by means of squeeze rolls.

The result of such a method of application is to leave the felt unaffected internally by the asphalt, but to secure permanently to the surface or surfaces of the felt, an even thickness, uniform layer of asphalt.

Materials of this character unite the.insulating effects of felt and'its sound deadening qualities, with the weather, acid and other resistant qualities of asphalt.

In the use of such felts today, they are nailed to the studding in wooden buildings, or secured by means of building them in between two walls or layers of cement, plaster or the like, or merely superimposing them onto desired structures.

In use with linoleum, a layer of cement is placed on the floor by a brush, the uncoated felt is laid on the cement, and then the linoleum'is glued down to the felt. The application of the cement and glue cannot be uniform, and materials used are not of the highly insulating, acid proof, water, corrosion and disintegration proof qualities that distinguish asphalt. 1

In the drawings, I have shown in the sole figure a floor and a piece of felt, upon which has been previously formed a top and bottom layer of uniform character of asphalt. The linoleum is shown at the top of the upper layerof asphalt.

nsulation, of which 7 In laying such a floor I take sheets of felt upon'which surface layers of asphalt. witnout saturation into the fabric. have previously been formed in the factory, I employ a solvent for asphalt, and spray, brush or flow onto the feltsufficient to soften the outer portions thereof. As a solvent, any volatile tar or petroleum solvent will serve. The volatile character is required because of the fact that if not quickly evaporated, the solvent may penetrate the felt, and the asphalt will then get into the felt and destroy its resilient and deadening qualities.

As such solvents I prefer benzol, solvent naphtha or toluol, or the two mixed with each other, which is a more commercial product. Gasoline, paint makers naphtha, and readily volatile kerosene will also serve.

A solvent which has too thorough an action. such as turpentine. wood naphtha or the like, will also have the tendency to dissolve too much of the asphalt, since only the surface mustbe dissolved.

The felt can then be laid on the floor and will permlanently adhere thereto. The linoleum can also be laid on top of the felt and will permanently adhere thereto.

The asphalt will act in its usual manner as an insulator against the destructive action to which floors are exposed. If it is desired to take up the linoleum, the felt can be torn apart at its intermediate portions, leaving part of it adhering to the linoleum and part to the floor. The linoleum can thus be removed and the floor scraped or the felt dissolved off. This is not practical with the .cements used in the present methods of gluing down linoleum.

In attaching the asphalt-surfaced felt to 2. The method of proofing with felt, 1'10.

which consists in employing a felt upon dissolving the surface as an adherent for cementing the felt in place, the solvent used being sufiicient to dissolve the surface of the asphalt layer bnly and quickly volatile. y

3.' The method of laying. linoleum or. the like with sound p-roofin felt, which consists in employing a elt upon both surfaces, of which a regular layer of asphalt has been' preformed without penetrating the body of the felt laying the felt on the floor and the linoleum on top of it, whereby the dissolved asphalt surface will act as a cementing agent to permanently engage both the floor and the linoleum.

4:. The method of laying linoleum or the like with soundproofing felt, which consists in employing a felt upon both surfaces of which a regular layer of asphalt has been preformed without penetrating the body of the felt, applying a solvent of asphalt to the surfaces of the felt, laying the felt on the floor and the linoleum on top of it, whereby the dissolved asphalt surface will act as a cementing agent to permanently engage both the floor and the linoleum, said solvent being applied so as to dissolve the surface only of the asphalt layers.

5. The method of laying linoleum or the like with sound proofing felt, which consists in employing a felt upon both surfaces of which a regular layer of asphalt has been preformed without penetrating the body of the belt, applying a solvent of asphalt to the surfaces of the felt, laying the felt on the floor and the linoleum on top of it, whereby the dissolved asphalt surface will act' as a cementing agent to permanently engage both the floor and the linoleum, said solvent being applied so as to dissolve the surface only of the asphalt layers and having a highly volatile quality.

JOSEPH s. -YNARD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2541631 *Jul 29, 1944Feb 13, 1951Standard Oil Dev CoProcess of producing an impregnated, waterproof, fibrous sheet
US3402742 *Aug 27, 1964Sep 24, 1968Royston LabPipe coating methods and coated pipe
US7524778Nov 8, 2004Apr 28, 2009Henkel CorporationComposite sheet material
US7785437Jan 26, 2007Aug 31, 2010L&P Property Management CompanyAnti-microbial carpet underlay and method of making
US7875343Oct 31, 2007Jan 25, 2011L & P Property Management Companycoating a pad and forming a laminated film; contains foam particles bonded together by a binder including zinc pyrithione; linear low density polyethylene homo- or copolymer
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/71, 404/82, 156/313
International ClassificationE04B1/82, E04B1/84
Cooperative ClassificationE04B1/82, E04B2001/8461
European ClassificationE04B1/82