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Publication numberUS1474779 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 20, 1923
Filing dateJul 8, 1922
Priority dateJul 8, 1922
Publication numberUS 1474779 A, US 1474779A, US-A-1474779, US1474779 A, US1474779A
InventorsZur Kammer August
Original AssigneeZur Kammer August
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tile for walls, floors, ceilings, and the like
US 1474779 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 20 1923. 11 7M-,7?

A. ZUR KAMMER TILE FOR WALLS, FLOORS, C EILINGS, AND THE LIKE Filed July 8. 1922 3 swam-smo 1 12,1. I far/.2. 12

Whwsse:

@ywf rm a Nov. 20, 1923. HA'MJ'FQ A. ZUR KAMMER TILE FOR WALLS, FLOORS, CEILINGS, AND THE LIKE Filed July 8. 1922 a swam-Shaw 2 M'hzz axes Nav; 20 1923. L474fi7 A. ZUR KAMMER I TILE FOR WALLS, FLOORS, CEILINGS, AND THE' LIKE Filed July 8. 1922 5 fiheefis fiheetl 5 Patented Nov. .20, 1923.

STATES AUGUST ZUR KAMMEB,

TILE non WALLS, rnoons,

Application filed July 8,

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, Dn. AUGUST ZUR Karat-inn, a citizen of the German Republic, and residing at Hagen, Germany, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Tiles for lValls, Floors, Ceilings, and the like, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to a tile surface comprising tiles all of which are of identical shape, each tile consisting of a regular polygon of more than six angles from which equilateral polygons are omitted so as to form reentrant angles which are equal to the outer angles omitted, whereby such tiles when laid on a base will be supplemental to the adjacent tiles and form a continuous surface without requiring an employment of tiles of other shape or of fragment pieces.

The accompanying drawings show, by way of example, plan views of different shapes of tiles constructed according to the present invention, the original shapes of the same being in Figs. 1, 2 and 3 equilateral octagons, in Figs. 4, 5 and 6 equilateral decagons, in Fig. 7 an equilateral dodecagon, and in Fig. 8 an equilateral 0ctodecagon, Figs. 9 to la inclusive represent ing various tile compositions.

In the tile shown in Fig. 1, an equilateral tetragon (rhomb) is omitted from a regular octagon and thereby one reentrant corner is formed, 01 which the inner angle a is exactly as large as any of the five outer angles 5, namely 135, while the two angles a are In the tile shown in Fig. 2, two oppositely located rhombs are omitted from a regular octagon, so that two reentrant corners are formed, of which the inner angles a are exactly as large as the two outer angles 5, namely the four angles 0 being again 90 each.

The tile shown in g. that shown in Fig. with the exception that the angles a and b are that is equal to the angles of a regular dodecagon.

In the tile shown in Fig. 1. two oppositely located rhombs are omitted from a regular decagon, while in the tile shown in Fig.

3 corresponds to 5 two rhombs separated by one side of the 1 regular decagon are omitted. In both cases. the angles a are 108 each. The tlle shown in F1g. 6 is also an equil arner carr es.

on nnenn, can-Many.

cuisines, AND THE LIKE.

1922. Serial no. 573,555.

lateral decagon with two reentrant corners, but derived from a regular dodecagon (see dot-and-dash lines) from which two equilateral hexagons and one square have been omitted, the angles acorrcsponding to the angles 6 and being 150 each, while the two angles 0 are 90 each and the two angles d 120 each.

In the tile shown in Fig. 7, three rhombs are omitted from a regular dodecagon and uniformly distributed, e. g. separated by each two adjacent sides of the latter, the angles a and b being 150 each and a 120 each.

In the tile shown in Fig. 8, three equi lateral hexagons are omitted from a regular octodecagon and uniformly distributed, e. g. separated by each three adjacent sides of the latter.

The continuation for the number of sides 24, 80, 36, and so on, follows per se.

As to the formation of the tiles, it may be supposed that the tiles shown in Figs. 2 and are produced by putting an isosceles triangle to the sides of a square alternately outwards and inwards, while those shown in Figs. 7 and 8 are produced by putting an isosceles triangle, or an isosceles trapezoid respectively, to the sides of a regular hexagon alternately inwards and outwards. As a general rule it :tollows that when putting one and the same plane to the sides of a square as well as of a regular hexagon alternately inwards and outwards, an area can be gaplessly filled-out by means of a plurality of equal figures thus produced.

Fig. 9 represents a gapless composition 01 identical tiles shown in Fig. 1, 10 the same composition in groups around. a pillar c, Fig. 11 a gapless composition of identical tiles shown in Fig. 2, Fig. 12 a gapless composition of identical tiles shown in Fig. 5, Fig. 13 a gapless composition of identical tiles shown in Fig. 6, and Fig. 14; a gapless composition of identical tiles shown in Fig. 7. Obviously, other compositions lie within the scope of the present invention.

The compositions of identical tiles show few joints only, which, besides. lie at. an angle to each other, and smaller angles than 90 do not occur.

By subdividing the upper surface of the tiles in regular sections, such as, for instance, indicated by the dotted lines in Figs.

9 to 14: inclusive, a picture of regular poly onal identical tiles appears in the different compositions, by the parts omitted being figuratively supplemented by the adjacent tiles. Such subdivision can be effected in any appropriate Way and fashion.

A particularly efi'ect-ive composition with the aid of such superficial subdivisions is obtained by colouring the subdivisional sec-V tions of the tiles in any desired various way and design, as indicated by the di fi'erent colour llnes 1n Figs. 9 to 14 inclusive.

' 'VVhat I claim, is:

1. A tile surface comprising tiles all of which are of identical shape, each tile consisting of a regular polygon of more than six angles from which equilateral polygons are omitted so as to form reentrant angles which are equal to the outer angles omitted. whereby such tiles when laid on a base will be supplemental to the adjacent tiles and form a continuous surface, substantially as setforth. V

2. A tile surface comprising tiles all of which are of identical shape, each tile consisting of a. regular polygon of more than six angles from which equilateral polygons are omitted so as to form reentrant angles which are equal to the outer angles omitted, whereby such tiles when laid on a base will be supplemental to the adjacent tiles and form a continuous surface, the upper surface of each tile being so subdivided in regular sections that the parts omitted from one tile are figuratively supplemented by the adjacent tiles, substantially as and for the purpose set forth.

7 DR. AUGUST m KAMMERQ Witnesses: S. F. K. STEPHAN.

WM. BETRY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4125341 *Aug 26, 1977Nov 14, 1978Reinschuetz HansPaving block
US4128357 *Feb 28, 1978Dec 5, 1978Barth GuenterSlab-elements for covering the ground
US4185939 *Jul 11, 1978Jan 29, 1980Gunter BarthGround covering slab
US4620998 *Feb 5, 1985Nov 4, 1986Haresh LalvaniCrescent-shaped polygonal tiles
US4996813 *Sep 21, 1989Mar 5, 1991Kliethermes Jr John CSound block
US5108219 *Dec 14, 1990Apr 28, 1992Hair Roberta AInterlocking paving stone
US5201602 *Sep 5, 1991Apr 13, 1993Hanover Architectural Products, Inc.Paving block assembly and paving blocks therefor
US5244303 *Apr 16, 1992Sep 14, 1993Hair Roberta AInterlocking paving stone
US5620278 *May 17, 1993Apr 15, 1997Shapes & Solutions LimitedTile
US5678370 *Nov 13, 1995Oct 21, 1997StonemarketSurface covering
US6898906 *Sep 24, 2001May 31, 2005Andreas DrostFloor covering element consisting of artificial stone material and set of floor covering elements
US7988382Mar 23, 2010Aug 2, 2011Oldcastle Building Products Canada, Inc.Artificial flagstone for providing a surface with a natural random look
US8011152 *Feb 28, 2008Sep 6, 2011Transpave Inc.Block suitable for use in an arrangement of interlocking blocks
US8132981Jun 23, 2011Mar 13, 2012Oldcastle Building Products Canada, Inc.Artificial flagstone for providing a surface with a natural random look
US8226323Sep 18, 2008Jul 24, 2012Oldcastle Building Products Canada, Inc.Covering unit
US8337116Feb 6, 2012Dec 25, 2012Oldcastle Building Products Canada, Inc.Artificial flagstone for providing a surface with a natural random look
US8413397May 20, 2009Apr 9, 2013Oldcastle Building Products Canada Inc.Artificial stone
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US8668404Jun 12, 2012Mar 11, 2014Oldcastle Building Products Canada, Inc.Covering unit
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US8743872Jul 9, 2012Jun 3, 2014Oracle International CorporationStorage traffic communication via a switch fabric in accordance with a VLAN
US8747019May 30, 2013Jun 10, 2014Oldcastle Building Products Canada, Inc.Artificial flagstone for providing a surface with a natural random look
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US8868790Feb 12, 2005Oct 21, 2014Oracle International CorporationProcessor-memory module performance acceleration in fabric-backplane enterprise servers
US8967907May 7, 2014Mar 3, 2015Oldcastle Building Products Canada, Inc.Artificial flagstone for providing a surface with a natural random look
US9057197Mar 6, 2014Jun 16, 2015Oldcastle Building Products Canada, Inc.Artificial stone
US9193215Dec 19, 2014Nov 24, 2015Oldcastle Building Products Canada, Inc.Artificial flagstone for providing a surface with a natural random look
US20040045248 *Sep 24, 2001Mar 11, 2004Andreas DrostFloor covering element consisting of artificial stone material and set of floor convering elements
US20070217865 *Oct 25, 2005Sep 20, 2007Oldcastle Building Products Canada, Inc.Artificial Flagstone For Providing A Surface With A Natural Random Look
US20100162648 *Feb 28, 2008Jul 1, 2010Marcel ThomassenBlock suitable for use in an arrangement of interlocking blocks
US20100236174 *Sep 23, 2010Oldcastle Building Products Canada, Inc.Artificial flagstone for providing a surface with a natural random look
USD695915Sep 5, 2012Dec 17, 2013Oldcastle Building Products Canada, Inc.Paver
USD695916Sep 5, 2012Dec 17, 2013Oldcastle Building Products Canada, Inc.Paver
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DE10029534A1 *Jun 15, 2000Jan 3, 2002Gerhard Georg SchulzFlat element to coat or clad surface or body; has contour that is determined using reference point, three rays at 30 degrees and has polygonal shape with straight or curved sides
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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/311.2, 428/47, 52/608, D25/159
International ClassificationB44C3/00, B44C3/12
Cooperative ClassificationB44C3/123
European ClassificationB44C3/12D