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Publication numberUS1477131 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 11, 1923
Filing dateSep 30, 1922
Publication numberUS 1477131 A, US 1477131A, US-A-1477131, US1477131 A, US1477131A
InventorsIrving Xtjlik
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
X-ray mount
US 1477131 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 11', 1923.

Filed Sept. 30, 1922 l l l i PAUVENTS NAME D'QCTOPS NAME..

Patented Dec. vl1, 1923.

UNITED STATES PATENT joFFicE,

RVING KULIK, F BROKLYN, NEW YORK.

. X-BAY MOUNT.

Application led September 30,1922. Serial No. 591,491.`

To all whom t may concem:

Be it known that I, IiiviNG KULIK, 'a citizen 'of the United States, residing at New York city,4 borough of Brooklyn,

county of Kings, and State of New York,

have invented a' new and useful X-Ray Mount, of which the following is a specification. v This invention relates generally to a mount for photographic transparencies but in addition is'particularly'directed t0 also provide a scientific means i'or easily pointig out certain points in X-ray pictures. l -ra f dentists and the medical profession gener` ally to determine the exact internal condilocated exactly as he tion of a patient or to definitely locate theV seat of. some disorder or ailment. It is the practice for the physician or dentist to sendv the patient to a radiologist who takes the necessary X-ray pictures, staples them to a card and forwards this card to the physician or dentist together withany notations which y he wishes to make on the particular case under consideration.' The radiologist naturally wishes tobe certain that` particular points referred to in his diagnosis will be intendedwhen he made the diavnosis. It often happens, for example in an a -ray negative of teeth, that a radiologist will diagnose an infection 'over `aroot of a particulartooth. That infection can bev anywhere about the root ofl that tooth. In spite of even .a .lengthy explanation or diagnosis bythe radiologist,'the'exact location cannot be 'explainedlwith precision,

A especially if the infection appears obscure in use of myV invention, hereinafter described f .withA section lines, `will vbe made less ltives will not have to be Imarred hThe presentinvention rovides an efficient -a-nd convenient mount f) area of the photographic transparency, se

the X-ray nefrative. Gften, because of this diiieulty, the '3i-ray negative is marked with pen and ink outlinesv or arrows to show where the infection is. The X-ra'ynegative is thus marred -or defaced.

.by employment lof a system, of indices diiiicultl and X-rag' negaor such anX-ray negative and is soA constituted asfto. not only permit of proper notations as the doctors`A name and date," for diagnoses, to#

name, case number, patients 'but also containsl space gether with means for accurately locating'by definite reference any particular point or of this invention pictures are frequently resortedto byV vmade of white Through the.

lscale of the window, any

explanation of diagnosis b that the radiologist may linform the doctor or the doctor inform his patient of the exact location of the infection or other disorder as .well as the area or areas affected.

In its preferred practical form, the mount embodies a folder com ris- The 'center of the ront ing two leaves.

leaf is cutaway to Yform a window and in back of this window is attached asheet of transparent or translucent material, such as (zelluloid, secured to the back of the front per. The spacing of this section lining corresponds to the scale or scales of the window opening, so that when a photographic transparencyis associated with the window opening, the folding rof the two leavesA of the` folder into fae abutting relation will bring the section liningof the backleaf into cooperative,V relation with the scales of the window opening... The folder, isgpreferably board, so thatv when the -parts are'` folded, as described, and are held up in front of a strong transmitted light, such, for example, as an through the back leaf and through the photographic transparency, so that vthe transparency may be viewed from theV front while the 1 section lining on the back leaf willalso be clearly seen. v

certain of which extend ,in parallel lativelylightcard or bristol v electric bulb, the light will show.vr

v1s a scale or scales and on the front faceY quadrille ruled lines:

' By reference 'to-these sectionlines and the particular point on the X-ray negative may be clearly 'identified numbers or'v letters and spaces are -pro- 'vided on the lfolder, preferably on the front faceof the yback leafforthe vnotation of this information. -That isto say,any particular location vmaybe referred toby numjbers oriiguresf. in such` manner thatailily .other person subsequently inspectin negative' in the same manner Vwi be a le to fo low the, diagnosis and understand exactly what the vwriterwho made the' notations desired' to,convey.

los `i I have vfound byfexperience that if "a photographic. transparency is Viewed .by 'strong transmitted light through an open ing bordered by White or some other color which would beapt to produce a glare. that it is y White on this black background. This ar- 'rangement enables the scale to be readily seen, but precludes the objectionable glare referred to. I consider the employment of this dark colored border and surrounding xline of considerable practical importance,

since it enables the rest of the mount t0 be white and therefore the second leaf is ren,-

dered capable of transmitting light through the negative. Moreover, by making a card white or of some other light color, the printing and other notations thereon may be easily read.

Aside from the foregoing considerations, the photographicv transparency is preferably also provi-.fled with a scale or some other suitable designation which enables it to be properly positioned with respect to the scale of the Window opening, so that if the transparency should shift, it may be readily returned to its proper position to enable accurate readings. ,Features of the invention, other than those adverted to, will be apparent from the hereinafter detailed description and i claims ,when read in conjunction With the y one practical accompanying drawings.

The accompanying drawings illustrate embodiment of the invention, but'theconstruction therein'shoivn, is to be .understood as illustrative, only, and not as defining the limits of the invention. Y Figure l is a vie-W of the mount in its normalV folded position. y

Figure 2 shows the mount in open posi- 'tion to disclose the back side of the front leaf and the front side of the back leaf thereof; and,

Figure 3 is a front view of a photographic transparency adapted to be mounted on the folder. v

The amount shown in the accompanying drawings consists of a folder embodying a front leaf 1 and a back leaf 2 adapted to be folded on the line `3 in Figure 2 into the position shown in-Figure l. The front leaf l is provided 'at its center with an opening or window 4 and positioned back of this vvindovy7 is a sheet of transparent ,material 5 of Celluloid or other suitable ,material` which is preferably frosted, so as to diffuse light passing therethrough. The sheet 5 is somewhat larger than the Window opening scales 9 are formezl by 4 and is secured in face abuttingvrelation to the back of the leaf 1 by means of staples 6 or other convenient means, so as to provide an intermediate pocket adapted to receive a film plate or other photographic window opening 4 is a series of section lines 8, similar to the section lines found on engineers plotting paper and these lines are so spaced as to cooperatewith scales 9 and 10 formed along the longitudinal and lateral edges of the Window opening. vThe scales 9 are for the purpose of illustration shown as embodying a series of graduations successively designated by capital or upper case letters A, B, C, etc., While the frraduations successively designated by small or lower case letters a, b, c, etc. Accordingly, when the section lines 8 are brought intocooperative relation with the scales 9 and 10, they avoid ambiguity and facilitate rapid and correct location of any particular point in the area of the WindowV opening. Assume for eX- ainple, that an X-ray negative is in cooperative relation with the Window and the folder is in folded position and isheld in front of an electric lighty bulb. `Light from the bulb will be .transmitted through the back leaf of the folder, through the `celluloid 5 and through the X-ray negative, so that aperson viewing the ne ative by this transmitted light can readily eterrnine any particular Y' pointiin the negative by reference tothe scales 9 and 10 and assisted by the lines 8.

For example, the particularpoint to be called attention to might be kat the'k inner section of the line passing through tbe graduations G in Figure l, and anotlierfline passing through the scale graduation e.

This particular point may be definitely located by a statement that thislocation occurs G-e and space is left on the front lface of the back sheet 2 for such a nota-tion, which, in Figure 2, is shown as Written in said space. i.

Assume that the X-rayed picture shows an area of infection extending between the lines C-E and between ye--g. Space is left on the front face of the back leaf for the notation of such areas as are involvedA and they may be noted in the presentzinstance as C-E and `e-{h-as shown in Figure 2.

In practice', X-ray negatives particularlyr those taken of teethhsually show/suchteeth substantially life size' and areqsubstantially true to scale. Accordingly, if they scales or graduations in the Window openings.-,are laid 4out to a unit of measure,r an exact mathematical area or linear. measurement; can be rapidlyfcalculated. That istosay, nifeach graduation of the sca-le 9 :aSSumedfto be y tance apart, a dentist can readily tell the back leaf thereof and also to enable Writingv length of a root of a tooth or theextent to Which an abscess at the base. of such root has progressed, so thatI in using a pulp breach or other dental instrument, he can be sure that he has reachedA the base of the difficulty.

In practice, the photographic transpar. ency 7 may lit the pocket beneath the'backl of the Window opening tightly, or may be stapled or otherwise secured in place, sot-hat it cannot shift after once vbeing positioned the transparency removable, some designatingA mark or scale should be associated with the transparency so that it cannot shift position without such shifting being noted. Thus, i1 Figure 3 I have shown the front face of a photographic transparency on which is designated scales corresponding to the scales around 'the Window opening.

These scales enable the. positioning of the transparency in an accurate manner and may be formed directly upon a negative or on a strip or strips of material associated with the negative. Thus the scales or indices on the transparency and ,about the Window may be brought into juxtaposition, letter for letter, when it is desired to take the initial reading and when it is desired at any inv. e

In practice, the folder is preferablymade White or of some other light pale color,` so that light may be transmitted through the or printed matter thereon to be easily read. I find it convenient to provide spaces on the front sheet for the Writing of the patients name, the doctors name, the case number and the date, and additional spaces may be utilized for advertising matter,V such as that of the studio in which the pictures are taken. However, when a white or light colored folder is employed, such light color directly adjacent the photographic negative makes it very difficult from 'an ocular standpoint to properly'read the negative, which, for,

the best 4results, should be surrounded with a black or relatively dark background or mat. To'this end, and in order to employ a White or light colored folder, I surround the 'Window opening with a deep border 11 of some contrasting color, preferably black or dark green so as to set oit the negative and render it more easily read. Surround* ing the dark border and giving it sharpness of outline is a fine line 12. The scales and -graduations 9 and 10 are left light, on this rangement is highly beneficial and practical and gives very satisfactory results.

time to check or to follow such initial reading out of its intended purposes. The radii y ologist takes the X-ray'picturdmounts it in the holder and makes `the notations calling attention to particular-locations or areas and forwards the mount with attachedrX-ray picture to the physician or dentist,fW.ho"is able to see at ak glance by following the note of instructions, the exact locations and areas to'Which attention has been" called. He'fcan then diagnose the case under consideration and proceed accordingly VVand ifthe lpatient y desires to have informatiom'the doctor or therein. If` however, it is desired to havedentist can readily explain by the `notations and pliotographs'the 'exact naturefand extent of the patients trouble. Through the use of my invention the patient or' doctor can always have for reference `any unmarred negative upon which any particular point can at an T time be easil and correctly `located.v AlV oreover, bv re erence to the provided index upon the mount, a patient to whoni'the names of theparts of thebody are unknovvncan be readily shown the seatfof trouble Without naming other parts of the body to show the locations, as is ordinarily necessary. H

The mounts aremade of a size and shape that when folded they can be readily tiled `in acard index for'readyreference and will serve as a permanent'record.

The accompanying drawings show the invention `in its preferred form, but- I am aware that slight modifications may be made in structural details without departing from.

the spirit ork substance of this Vinvention which is to be`understood as' broadly novel as is commensurate with the appended claims.`

Having thus fully described the -inven-lv tion, what I claim as nenv `and desire to secure byIiettersPatent is: I

1.` A mount for photographic transparencies embodyinga folder of relatively light colored material adapted to transmit light.

2. ik mount for photographic transpaii' p y l encies embodying a folder of` relatively light colored material adapted to transmit light and comprising two leaves', the front leaf of i'vhicli is provided with apivindovv opening, a pocket associated With the Window opening and adapted to support a photographic transparency in juxtaposition with the Window, so that said transparency may be viewed by transmit-ted light, and a rela-k tively dark colored border around the window opening to preclude glare when the transparency is thus viewed.

' 3. Al mount tor photographic transparencies embodying a folder of relatively light colored Vmaterial adapted to transmit light opening to preclude vglare when the transparency is thus *viewed and graduated scales along the longitudinal and lateral edges of the window opening, by means of which points on the photographic transparency canbe readily and accurately located by reference to such scales.

4. A mount for photographic transparencies embodying a folder of relatively light colored material adapted to transmitliglitand comprising two leaves, the front leaf of i which is provided with a window opening, 'means for mounting a photographic transparency Yin juxtaposition with the window opening` so that said transparency may be viewedby transmitted light, a relatively dark colored border around the Window opening to preclude glare when the transparency is thus viewed, graduated Scales along the longitudinal and lateral edges of the window opening, by means of which points on the photographic transparency can be readily 'and accurately located by reference to such scales,` and designations associated with the photographic transparency adapted to be brought into registration with the scales adjacent the window opening for the purpose of properly positioning the transparency with reference to the window opening.

5. mount for photographic transparen- 'i cies embodying a folder-of relatively lightA colored material adapted to transmit light and comprising two leaves, the front leaf of which is prov-ded with a window opening,

means for mounting a photographic trans-y parency in juxtaposition with the window opening. so `that said transparency may be viewed by transmitted light, a relatively dark colored border around the window.

opening to preclude glare when the transparency is thus viewed, graduated scales along the longitudinal and lateral edges of the `window opening. by means ofvvhich points on the photographic transparency can be readily and accurately located by reference to suchscales, and cross section lines ontheback leaf adapted to be seen through the photographic transparency when the transparency is viewed by transmitted light to facilitate the location of any particular point with reference to the scales.

6. A mount. for photographic transparencies embodying a folder of relatively light colored material adapted to transmit light and comprising two leaves, the front leaf of which is provided with a Window opening, means for mounting a photographic transparency in juxtaposition with the window opening, so that said transparel'icy may be viewed by transmitted light, a relatively dark colored border around the window opening to preclude glare when the transparency is thus viewed, graduated scales along the longitudinal and lateral 'edges of the window opening, by @means of which points on the photographic transparency can be readily and accurately located by reference to such scales, designates associated with the photographic transparency adapt- 'edv to be brought into registration with the scales adjacent-the window opening for the purpose' of properly positioning the, transparency with reference to the window opening, and spaces on the folder in which notations of'such locations are adapted to be written, so that said point or points onthe negative may be readilyrelocated.

7. A mount for photographic transparencies embodying a folder of relatively. light colored material adapted to transmit light and comprising two leaves, the lfront leaf of. which is provided With a 'Window opening,

'means for mounting a photographic transparency in juxtaposition with the Window opening, so that said transparency may be viewed by transmitted light, a relatively dark colored border around the Window opening to preclude glare when 'the tr'ansparency is thus viewed, graduated'scales along the longitudinal and lateral edges of the window opening, by means of which points on the photographic transparency can be readily and accurately located by reference to such scales, cross section lines on the back leaf adapted to be seen through the photographic transparency when the transparency is viewed by transmitted light to facilitate the correct location of any particular point with reference to the scales, and spaces on the folder in which notations of such locations are adapted to be written, so that said point or points on 'the negative may be readily relocated,

8. Ay mount for photographic transparencies provided with a Window opening, graduated scales along the longitudinal and lateral edges of said window opening, and means for mounting a photographic transparency in juxtaposition with the Window opening, whereby any point in the photographic transparency may be easily and accurately located by reference to said scales.

9. A mount for photographic transparencies provided with a Window opening, graduated scales along the longitudinal and lateral edges of said opening, means for detachably supporting a photographic transparency in juxtaposition with the window opening, and designations associated with the photographic transparency for securing proper registration of the transparency with the opening, so that any point in the photographic transparency may be readily and accurately located by reference to said scales when said transparency is viewed by transmittcd light.

lO. A mount for photographic transparencies provided with a window opening, graduated scales along the longitudinal and lateral edges of the Window opening, means for mounting a photographic transparency in juxtaposition with the Window opening, so that any pointin the photographic transparency can be readily and accurately located by reference to the scales when the transparency is viewed by transmitted light, and a deep dark colored border surrounding the window opening and .forming a matte for the transparency for the purpose of facilitating the reading of the transparency b transmitted light.

1l. mount Jfor photographictransparencies'embodying a sheet of material provided with a window opening, graduated Scales along the longitudinal and lateral edges of the opening, means for mounting on said sheet of material a photographic transparency in juxtaposition with the window opening, and a second sheet of material associated with the rst sheet and adapted to transmit light, said second sheet being provided with section lining and adapted to be brought into tace abutting relation with the first sheet, so that the photographic transparency may be viewed by light transmitted through the second sheet, and the transparency, whereby the cross section lines on the second sheet. will facilitate the location ot' any point in the photographic transparency with reference to the graduated scales associated vwith the window opening.

l2. A mount for photographic transparencies embodying a light colored sheet of material provided with a Window opening, a deep black border around the Window opening, graduated scales along the longitudinal and lateral edges ot' the open-ing printed in light color, so as to transmit light through the scales, but to preclude the transmission of light through the border, and means for securing a photographic transparency in juxtaposition With the Window opening, so that the photographic transparency may be viewed by transmitted light through the window opening and any particular point in the transparency definitely located by means of the graduated scales.

In testimony whereof I have signed the foregoing specification.

' IRVING KULIK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2518571 *Jul 27, 1946Aug 15, 1950Reeves Arthur EFilm printing device
US2926444 *Mar 13, 1958Mar 1, 1960Winthrop Atkins Co IncGreeting card mount
US2935807 *Sep 3, 1957May 10, 1960Gibson Art CompanyDisplay mount sheet for greeting cards
US3188762 *Mar 1, 1962Jun 15, 1965Philip MorrillEmbellished photo-mounts
US3686784 *Oct 7, 1970Aug 29, 1972Hirsch PlastikLatern slide cover
US3959907 *Dec 9, 1971Jun 1, 1976Microseal CorporationFilm record card
US4027411 *Feb 19, 1976Jun 7, 1977Foldessy Jr JosephMicrofiche marking system
US4521091 *Sep 23, 1982Jun 4, 1985Custom Laboratories, Inc.Slide production system
Classifications
U.S. Classification40/703, 378/65, 353/120
Cooperative ClassificationG06K19/04