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Publication numberUS1477686 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 18, 1923
Filing dateOct 18, 1918
Priority dateOct 18, 1918
Publication numberUS 1477686 A, US 1477686A, US-A-1477686, US1477686 A, US1477686A
InventorsWalter P Braender
Original AssigneeWalter P Braender
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container
US 1477686 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 18 1923.

YW. P. BRAENDER CONTAINER Filed Oct. 18, 1918 Patented Dec. 18, 1923.

TATES WALTER P. BRAENDER, OF PASSAIC, NEW JERSEY.

CONTAINER.

Application led October 18, 1918. Serial No. 258,669.

application to the construction of a leakproof or uncture-proof tank. It is to be understoo however, that the tank may be ein loyed as a container for any material which may be found desirable.

As is well known, aeroplanes, motor cars, motor boats and the like are largely used in,- and constitute important factors f modern warfare, and are usually equipped with internal combustion engines usingv liquid fuel, such as gasoline. This liquid fuel is carried in tanks which are necessarily, during battle, exposed to the liability of inJury or destruction by gunfire. This danger 1s particularl present in the case of gasoline tanks o aeroplanes, for the tank may be pierced by a bullet or shell, so.

as to permit the gasoline to escape, and in many instances, in addition tothe tank being pierced, the bullet may be of such character as to set fire to the supply of gasoline within the tank, thereby causing a disastrous fire and explosion resulting in the destruction of the machine and frequently -in the injury and death of the occupants.

It is my purpose in the present instance to provide a tank for liquid fuel, such as gasoline or the like, which may be installed 1n an aeroplane, motor car, or motor boat, and which embraces such protective features as to 4be practicall leak-proof against punctures made by bu lets, shot and the like.

A further object of my invention is the provision of a tank of this character which is of light construction, so that it will not add materially to the weight to be carried by the machine or structure in which it is installed, and which will furthermore embody the desired features o efficiency, strength and durability.

'A further object of the invention is the provision of aA tank encased by protective coverings and provided with means for coniining' or resisting the presspre of fluid within tlietank which might cause the cover of the tank to bulge outwardly or to distort under certain conditions.

In the present instance I have shown certain preferred embodiments or forms of m leak-proof or puncture-proof tank, but I wish it to be understood that I do not limit myself to all the precise details of construction set forth herein by way of illustration, as modification and variation may be made without departin from the spirit of the invention or eXcee the ap ended claims.

Furt ermore, as above indicated, while my tank is particularly well adapted for use in connection with enginedriven structures,

such as boats, aeroplanes and motor cars intended for militar use, I wish it to be understood that it is not limited in its useful application to this particular purpose, but may be employed under such conditions as may be deemed advantageous or desirable. 4

In the accompanying drawings:

Figure 1. is a perspective view of a tank ing the scope of embodying a preferred form of my invention, a corner portion. of the tank being broken away.

Figure 2 is a view partly in vertical section taksen through the tank such as is shown in Figure 1, and illustrating the interior reinforcement.

Figure 3 is a View of a tank having a modified form of protective covering which is shown in sectio I Figure 4 is a ,view in elevation of a tank tion of the nVention,-I will state that inl the present instance I have shown my leakproof tank as substantially oblong or rectangular in form, that is to say, b oth the tank proper and its protective coverings are of such shape. However, it will of course be understood that this is merely by way of illustration, as the tank may be of any desired form or contour, either square cylindrical, segment shape or otherwise, an

that the exterior confining means may be shaped to meet the requirement of the particular form of tank upon which they are used. In a'. word, 1 do not lima myself to a tank of any vparticular shape.

Referring now to theaccompanying drawings in detail, the letter A indicates the tank proper which is adapted to contain the 11guid fuel, such as gasoline, or the like, th1s tank being made asis usual, of thin, strong metal, such as sheet-steel, copper or any other metal suitable for the purpose and the tank is provided with the usual ller neck 1, closed by the cap 2. As the tank proper A is composed of very thin metal, it is desirable, although not absolutely necessary, to reinforce the same interiorly, and for'this purpose I provide a reinforcing framework composed of thin, small, light rods, preferably of metal, such as aluminum, these rods running horizontally, as shown at a and ver tic'ally as shown ata, and best understood by reference to Figures 2 and 5. These rods sup ort horizontal splash lates a2 and vertioa splash plates a3, smal clips a4, shown in Figure 2 being employed to position the plates in position on the rods wherever needed. These splash plates are provided with holes a5, which lighten the plates and also allow the passage of the liquid. When the tank is relatively large and made of thin metal, it is preferable to employ an interior reinforcement which may be such as described but where the walls of the tank are of relatively strong, thick metal, or the tank is small, the interior reinforcement ma be omitted. Furthermore, it is to be un erstood that I do not limit myself to this particular construction of interior reinforcement as the tank may be stren hened' or reinforced interiorly in any suitab e manner. In the form of the invention shown in Figures 1 and 2, I envelop the outside of the wall 3 ofthe metal tank A in a loose protective cover or layer 4 of rubber, or a rubber-like composition of material. The layer or covering 4 surrounds but is separate or loose from the tank A which is best shown in Figure 2, and I employ soapstoneor other suitable substance during the ,molding of the cover about the tank to prevent the adhesion or sticking4 of the cover to thetank walls. I Aprefer to thus fit this cover 4 loosely about the tank and spaced apart from the walls thereof because I have discovered that when a bullet passes completely through a tank rit will, in making its exit,l smash the metal of the tank wall outward, thus formi small, jagged, spurlike sectlons, and i the rubber covering 4 were1 in contact Awith the tank wall the jagged metal f would ,impinge against thev rubber and hold metal will not be forced outward a sufficient distance to ilmpinge against the rubber andv open the cut made in the rubber bythe bullet. When this cover 4 is separate or spaced from the tank wall, however, the jagged consequently the hole in the latten will elasticity, expansibility, softness and compressibilit to obtain the best results, and therefore prefer toy employ slightly yundercured rubber which is sufficiently soft so that it will retain tensile strength to hold gasoline should it be cut by a bullet, steel splinter or the like, striking the tank, the cut or rupture made in the rubber will have a tendency to close, especiallyv under the action of this material swelling, which will occur by the gasoline coming in contact with the rubber substance in starting to seep or leak through the cut. The tank thus covered with the rubber layer 4, I envelop loosely in a rubber-covering or bag 5; that is to say, while this bag 5, which; is' also preferably composed of soft-rubber, or rubber-like material, completely envelops the layer 4 of the tank, it is not attached thereto, nor contacts therewith at all points, but will fit Vloosely around the same, so that a space will be left between the layer 4 vulcanized on the metal tank andthe rubber bag-.like cover 5 enveloping the layer 4, as described. The loose bag-like layer, or covering 5 of rubber is now enveloped or encased loosely in a nettin 6 of cloth, wire, or any other suitable, exi le material, the purpose of this outer covering 6 being to confine the parts encased thereby against bulging under pressure. Both the rubber coverings 4 and 5 and the netting 6 maybe made to tlti htly at the neck 1 ofthe'tank by any suitale collar or gasket arrangement shown at 6a.l In fact, any suitable means maybe resorted to for fastening the various covers at the neck of the tank.

I have found by experience that a tank constructed, for instance, as shown in Figures 1 and 2, when containin gasoline, and

closed or sealed, by the expansibility ofA the'rubber itself. It also seems that when the gasoline, for instance, starts to seep through the hole or cut made in the rubber, it will vact upon the 'rubber and cause the latter to expand to a marked degree at the point where the gasoline ispercolating or seeping, so that this expansion at the cut or hole will cause the rapid closing vof the latter, thereby preventing the esca e of the gasoline, the entrance of air, an the explosion and firing of the contents of the tank. This is especially so when I employ a plurality of coverings of rubber, spaced apart one from the other, as above described.

The outer bag or netting is employed principally to act as a pressure retainer, or'

to confine the covers of the tank in proper form and shape, and thereby prevent bulging. Should the tank be penetrated by a bullet, some of the asoline might escape to the space between t e layers of rubber, and especlally when the tank is partially emptied, and to prevent undue dlstortion of the parts due to the bulging, I employ the conlining netting or bag.

In Figure 3 I have shown still another modified form of the invention, for in this instance I envelop the"metal tank A in a fabric covering 7, which is loose from the wall ofthe tank, and in turn envelop this fabric covering from the cover 7, and then enclose the cover -8 in a loose, asbestos bag or cell 9. The

asbestos bag or cell is enveloped .in a loose, rubber bag 10, while 11 indicates an outer netting enclosing the whole. These various layers or envelopes of material, being loose from one another and spacedapart, increase the leak-resistin qualities of the tank.

In Figure'l have shown a plurality of conlining plates 12 located at the exterior walls of my tank, these plates further actlng to prevent the bulging or distortion of the covers of the tank. These plates may be of any preferred form and character, and of any desired number, and so placed as to best act to prevent the distortion of the tank covers. Usually it is not necessary to employ such plates adjacent the top of the tanks, because although the 'tank may be filled when' the operator is starting on a journey, yet the gasoline used in operating the engine will of course gradually cause the lowering of the bulk of gasoline within the tank, so that the upper portion of the covers is not so liable to become distorted as is the center orv lower portion thereof.

I wish it to be understood in connection with the prevention of the'bulging or distortion of the covers of the tank, that I may employ plates, bags or nettings with or without each other, as in some instances it may not be necessary or desirable to employ the confining plates. WhileA I have here-in shown and described certain preferred forms of my invention, I wish it to be understood that I do not confine myself to allthe precise details herein set forth by way of illustration, as modification and variation may be made without departing froml the spirit of the invention or exceeding the scope of the appended claims.

What I claim is:

l. A fuel tank comprising a metallic contaiper for holding liquid fuel and an elastic casing therefor enveloping the container, the casing having walls spaced from walls of the container with an air space therebetween, the spacing lbeing such that jagged, spur-like edges of a container wall produced by a projectile passing therethrough will be 7 in a rubber cover 8, loose 4tainer and a prevented from reaching the elastic casing and holding open a cut made therein by the projectile. c

2. A fuel tank comprising a metallic container for holding li uid fuel and an elastic casing therefor loose y enveloping the container, the casing havlng walls spaced from walls of the container with an air space therebetween, the spacing being such that jagged, spur-like edges of a container wall produced b a projectile passin therethrough wil be prevented from reaiing the elastic casing and 'holding open a cut made therein by the projectile and the elastic casing being thereby permitted to expand to close the cut.

3. A fuel tank comprising a metallic container and a rubber cover or casingv loosely enveloping the same so that the jagged spur-like edges of a container wall produced by `a projectile passing therethrough will be prevented from reaching the rulbber cover of the casin and holding open a cut made therein by t e projectile, the rublber cover being thereby permitted to expand to close the cut.

4. A fuel tank comprising a metallic container and a plurality of coverings envelo ing the same, said coverings having wal S spaced apart from each other for providing an air space or pocket between the coverings.

5. A fuel tank comprising a metallic container and a plurality of coverings envelo ing the same, said coverings having walls spaced apart from each other, walls of the inner covering being spaced apart from walls of container with an air space or pocket therebetween.

6. A fuel tank comprising a metallic container and a plurality of coverings enveloping the same, said coverings having walls spaced apart from each other for providing an air space or pocket between the coverings, one of said coverings being of rubber like material and having the property of expanding to close a cut made in the covering by a rojectile.

7. fuel tank comprising a metallic conplurality of coverings envelo ing the same, said coverings having wa ls spaced apart from each other and from the walls of the container for providing air spaces therebetween and confining means located exteriorly of the coverings and associated therewith.

8. A fuel tank comprising a metallic container and a lurality of rubber coverings therefor loose y enveloping the same, the coverings having spaced apart walls for providing air pockets between the coverings.

9. A fuel tank comprising a metallic container, -a rubber covering loosely enveloping the exterior wall of the container so that the jagged spur-like edges of a container wall produced by a projectile passing therethrough will =be prevented from reaching the ings therefor m'ade of undercured rubber, rwbber covering and holding open a out the said coverings having walls spaced apart l0 made therein by a projectile and a second from each other and from the walls of the Wrapper covering enveloping and spaced container for providing air spaces thereapart from said first mentioned covering. between.

10. A leak-proof fue] tank comprising a In .testimony whereof I lhave hereunto set metallic container and casings for the said my hand. container comprising a plurality of cover- WALTER P., BRAEN DER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2612924 *Dec 6, 1949Oct 7, 1952Us Rubber CoCollapsible container
US2768018 *Jul 7, 1952Oct 23, 1956Hyster CoHydraulic load arm
US2846154 *Feb 17, 1955Aug 5, 1958In Sink Erator Mfg CompanySink mount for waste disposal units
US4345698 *Mar 25, 1980Aug 24, 1982The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Air ForceAircraft self-sealing fuel tank
US4368086 *Oct 22, 1981Jan 11, 1983The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Air ForceMethod of fabricating an aircraft self-sealing fuel tank
US4645379 *Oct 3, 1983Feb 24, 1987Conoco Inc.Pyramidal offshore structure
US5022555 *Jul 30, 1990Jun 11, 1991George GreenbaumComply system
US5398840 *May 24, 1993Mar 21, 1995The Boeing CompanyMicroparticle enhanced fibrous ceramic baffle for cryogenic liquid containers
US5589441 *Aug 19, 1994Dec 31, 1996The Boeing CompanySuperconductive fiberform ceramic composite
US5620945 *Jun 5, 1995Apr 15, 1997The Boeing CompanyForming slurry of superconductive metal oxide particles and ceramic fibers, dispersing over surface, drying, curing
US5753570 *Jun 5, 1995May 19, 1998The Boeing CompanyReinforced ceramic microform composite
US5888393 *Mar 16, 1995Mar 30, 1999The Boeing CompanyLiquid propellents, liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen, used in aircrafts, spacecrafts, controlling turbulance
US6554152 *Mar 5, 2001Apr 29, 2003Kenneth B. SmithProtective cover article for fuel tanks, particularly those used in motor sports
US6729492 *Jun 7, 2001May 4, 2004Exxonmobil Upstream Research CompanyLiquefied natural gas storage tank
US6732881 *Feb 24, 1999May 11, 2004Mobil Oil CorporationLiquefied gas storage tank
US6957542 *Nov 1, 2000Oct 25, 2005Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki KaishaFuel tank system
US6981305Mar 9, 2004Jan 3, 2006Exxonmobil Oil CorporationLiquefied natural gas storage tank
US7100261Oct 7, 2005Sep 5, 2006Exxon Mobil Upstream Research CompanyLiquefied natural gas storage tank
US7111750Mar 9, 2004Sep 26, 2006Exxonmobil Upstream Research CompanyLiquefied natural gas storage tank
US7694840 *Sep 1, 2004Apr 13, 2010H2Safe, LlcStorage vessel chamber for storing fuels such as hydrogen
US8387334 *Oct 13, 2010Mar 5, 2013Exxonmobil Upstream Research CompanyLNG containment system and method of assembling LNG containment system
US8561827Mar 19, 2010Oct 22, 2013H2Safe, LlcStorage vessel chamber for storing fuels such as hydrogen
US20110023408 *Oct 13, 2010Feb 3, 2011Gulati Kailash CLNG Containment System and Method of Assembling LNG Containment System
US20130043240 *Oct 27, 2010Feb 21, 2013Arne Barrett SeleBeam assembly and spacer elements
EP1137577A1 *Sep 28, 1999Oct 4, 2001Mobil Oil CorporationLiquefied gas storage tank
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/560.2, 220/501, 220/900, 220/9.1, 220/563, 220/DIG.100, 206/819, 206/527, 138/148
International ClassificationB64D37/06, B65D6/10
Cooperative ClassificationB64D37/06, Y10S220/01, Y10S220/90, B64D2700/6235, Y10S206/819
European ClassificationB64D37/06