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Publication numberUS1479209 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 1, 1924
Filing dateMar 14, 1922
Priority dateMar 14, 1922
Publication numberUS 1479209 A, US 1479209A, US-A-1479209, US1479209 A, US1479209A
InventorsMaurice J Topp
Original AssigneeWilliam C Clark, Alexander R Hammerle
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Collapsible sawhorse
US 1479209 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan 11, 1924 11,479,2@9

M. J. TOPP COLLAPSIBLE SAWHORSE Filed March 14. 1922 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 l ego Jim, 119 mm zm M. J. TOPP COLLAPS IBLE SAWHORSE Filed March 14, 1922 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 ?atentecl an. ll

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MAURICE J. TOPP, OF MANLIUS,

LIAM e. cmnx AND ONE-THIRD TO cuss, new Y0.

YORK, ASSIGNOR 0F ONE-TEL! 1 COLLAPSIBLE SAWHORSE.

Application filed March 14, 1922. Serial N0. 543,720.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, MAURICE in the county of Onondaga,

ave invented new and Collapsible Saw Manlius,

State of New York, h 6 useful Improvements in horses, of which connection with the accompanying ings, is a full, clear, and exact This invention J. Torr, of in the the, following, taken in relates to a drawdescription. collapsible horse of the class set forth in my pending application Serial #467,424, filed May 6, 1921, in that it comprises a channel beam and legs beam to fold into the channel.

hinged to each other and to the In my pending application referred to, the legs are pivoted to swinging yokes which in turn are pivotedto the channel beam but I have found in th may be disp pivoted directly to the si yokes e manufacture that these ensed with and the legs de walls of the channels with provision for relatively slight transverse movement 0 f the legs upon their pivots to allow them to be folded and unfolded transversely of the channel in any way interfering with ing of the legs into the chan my invention main object of without the free foldnels, and the is to provide greater sturdiness and durability and at the same time to greatl at a given ex ense 0 time and labor.

Another 0 whereby the increase the output ject is to provide means horse may be used for clamping objects of different widths thereto.

Other objects and uses will be brought out in the following description:

In the drawings: Figures 1, 2 and a side elevatio plan,

3 are, respectively,a top 11 and an end view of a collapsible horse embodying the various features of my invention.

indicating portions 0 re 4 is an enlarged inverted horse, the dotted into their respective recesses.

Figure 5 is an enlarged transverse vertical sectional view taken on line 5-5, Figure 1.

plan lines f the legs as unfolded ed detail longitudinal one end of the horse showing a portion 0 one of the legs as unfolded.

Figures 7 and elevation and an end view of one o f the gauge according to the work to which it v is to be applied and comprises a channel beam or top rail -1- and opposite pairs of legs -2-, one pair for each end of the channel beam for supporting the latter in a substantially horizontal plane when unfolded.

This channel beam preferably consists of a substantially flat top portion -3- and downwardly flaring lengthwise side portions or flanges 4-, the lower edges of which are bent inwardly toward each other at 5 for reinforcing and other purposes presently described.

The top portion 3.- is provided with a series of keyhole slots -6 arranged in sequence in spaced relation along the longitudinal center thereof for receiving clamping members -7- and 8--, one or'more of the slots near one end being arranged i111 a reverse order to that of the remaining s ots.

The end edges of the top portion --3- and side portions 4-- are bent downwardly and inwardly to form stop flanges -9 and -10- a ainst which the legs 2 rest when un olded or adjusted for use, the lower edges of the side walls being held against spreading by cross-bars -11-, which are spot welded or otherwise secured to the outer faces of the lower ends of the stop flanges -10-, Figure 3.

The legs -2 of each pair preferably consist of angle bars arranged'with their angles facing inwardly, thus for lengthwise flanges 12 andJ-13- whic are tapered from top to bottom, the lower ends being turned outwardly to form foot flanges -14- at such angles to their main bodies as to rest flat upon the floor when the horse is unfolded or adjusted for use.

The upper ends of the outer flan cs 13 are of less transverse width than t e distance between the opposite sides -4- on the leg of the top rail 1-- and are arranged within the channel, those of each pair being overlapped and pivoted to each other at 15 to enable them to swing one upon the other transversely of the top rail -1.

The upper ends of the other flanges 12 of each pair are pivotally and slidably mounted upon a pivotal bolt -16- whlch issecured to and between the opposite sides 4 of the top rail across the intervening channel a short distance below the top portion 3 and also a short distance from the ends of the top rail so that when the legs are unfolded the outer faces of the flanges 13 will rest against the sto flanges 10 on the ends of the top rail to limit the outward swinging movement of the legs.

That is, the holes in the upper ends of the leg flanges --12- through which the pivotal pins 16 are passed are a distance from the outer faces of the flanges -13substantially equal to the distance between the pivotal pin and inner faces of the end sto s 10- to permit the legs to rest against sald stops when unfolded, while the distance between the same pivotal holes and the upper edges of the legs is substantially equal to the distance between the pivotal pin --15 and lower portion of the top portion --3- of the top rail to allow the upper edges of the leg flanges --12-- to rest against the under side of the top portion 3-- when the legs are unfolded, thereby causing the top rail to be supported directly upon the upper ends of the legs irrespective of the pivotal pin -16 to relieve said pivotal pin from excessive strains.

The upper inner corners of the leg flanges -12 are rounded at -17 concentric with the pivot 16 to enable the legs to be folded and unfolded without straining any of the adjacent parts.

The outer ends of the flanges -5-- are cut away or recessed at -17-- a distance from the adjacent stop flanges --10- corresponding to the width of the adjacent portions of the leg flanges 12 to form stops -18 for engaging the inner edges of said flanges and holding the legs against inward swinging movement when unfolded or adjusted for use.

The legs of each pair are connected by toggle levers 19-- and -20- of substantially equal lengths having adjacent overlapping ends pivoted to each other at -21 and their outer ends pivoted,-res ectively, at 22- and 23- to the legs igure 5, the levers -20 being pivoted directly to the flanges 13- of the legs at one side, while the levers -19- are pivoted to lugs -24 flanges 12 on the opposite side in slight y spaced relation to the adjacent flanges 13 so as to allow the toggle levers to fold alongside each other when the gamma legs of each pair are folded together in which case, the flanges 13-- will overlap as shown by dotted lines in Figure 5 and by full lines in Figure 4.

The levers 19' and --20 of each pair are adapted to break upwardly from a straight lockin position, the levers 20 being provide in their upper edges with notches -25- intermediate their ends to receive offsetshoulders -26 on the extended ends of the levers --19 for limiting the downward swinging movement of said levers from a straight line, while permitting their upward swinging movement about their respective pivots.

A spring catch 27 Figure 4, is secured by spot welding or otherwise to the inner face of one side 4- of the top rail -1- to hold the legs in their folded positions within the channel of the top rail 1-- and ma be released by desired to unfold the legs.

The reversely arranged key-hole slot as 6' near one end Figure 9 serve to receive the clamping member 7, while the clamping member -8-- may be interlocked with any of the other slots andthereby adjusted toward and from the member --7-- for difl'erent widths of work to be clamped between them.

Each clamping member -7 and -8 is provided with studs 28- and 29-- Figures 7 k and 8, the stud 28- being relative y larger than the stud --29 to enter the larger portion of either of the slots 6 or 6- and is preferably T-shaped to interlock with the under side of the top portion 3- of the rail -1 when inserted through the larger portion of said slot and moved endwise into the smaller portion while the stud 29 is adapted to enter the smaller portion of the next adj acent' slot by the same lengthwise sliding movement of the clamping heads along and upon the top portion 3-, thus permitting said clamping heads to be adjusted to diflerent positions along the top rail and efl'ectively interlocked therewith with the assurance that both members will be interlocked with the smaller portions of the respective slotswhen clamping the work between them.'

It will be observed that the flanges -12- of the legs are of less transverse width than that of the sides -4i of the channel bar 1- and also less than the distance between the flanges 5- and pivotal pins -16 to enable the legs to be folded wholly within the channel between the flanges -5 and top portion 3 of the top rail and that when thus folded, the entire horse will occupy aspace not greater than the external dimensions of'the top rail.

When adjusting the folded horse for use, it is simply necessary to hold the top rail in the fingers when it is the emma one hand with the top portion --3-- uppermost and then to release the catch 27 with the other hand whereupon the legs will swing about the pivots -16- downwardly and outwardl under their own weight to substantially vertical planes, thereby registering with the notches or recesses -17 whereupon the toggle levers 19 and --20- may be flexed downwardly to a straightened position to rock the corresponding legs about their respective pivots -15- and against the inner faces of the sides 4- of the top rail, the horse being then ready for use, it being understood that during this operation, the legs will be braced against inward rocking movement by the shoulders --18 on the ends of the flanges -5.

What I claim is 1. A collapsible horse comprising a channel bar and pivotal pins extending across the channel and secured to the opposite sides thereof, and separate pairs of legs pivotally hung upon said pins and slidable lengthwise thereof to swing into and out of the channel, the legs of each pair being pivoted to each other to swing transversely of the channel.

2. In a collapsible horse, a channel bar having opposite lengthwise side flanges and opposite end flanges projecting from the side flanges toward each other, pivotal pins secured to the flanges and extending across the intervening channel near the ends thereof, and separate pairs of legs pivotally hung upon the pivotal pins to swing into and out of the channel and against the end flanges, those of each pair being separately pivoted to each other to swing transversely into and out of engagement with the lengthwise side flanges.

3. In a collapsible horse, a channel bar having opposite lengthwise side flanges and opposite end flanges prejecting from the side flanges toward each other, ivotal ins secured to the side flanges and exten ing across the intervening channel near the ends thereof, and separate pairs of legs pivotally hung upon the pivotal pins to swing into and out of the channel and against the end flanges,-those of each pair being separately pivoted to each other to swing transversely into and out of engagement with the lengthwise side flanges, said side flanges being provided with recesses for receiving the adjacent portions of the legs when unfolded for use.

4. A collapsible horse comprising a channel bar having pivotal pins across the channel near the ends thereof, stop flanges on the ends of the bar projectin toward each other, and separate pairs 0% legs pivotally hung upon the pins to swing into and out of the channel into and out of engagement with the end stop-flanges, the legs of each pair being separately pivoted to each other to swing transversely of the bar into and out of engagement with the opposite sides thereof and having their upper ends resting against the under side of the top of the bar when unfolded.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand this 9th day of March, 1922.

MAURICE J. TOPP.

Witnesses:

M. C. RILL, E. M. FRADENBURGH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2415259 *Jun 14, 1944Feb 4, 1947Weather Seal IncAdjustable jig
US2478828 *Feb 14, 1945Aug 9, 1949Larson Charles OTwo-way adjustable clamping flange for workbenches or the like
US2568557 *Jun 5, 1947Sep 18, 1951Leonard Newbery ArthurConstruction toy
US2621687 *Dec 13, 1947Dec 16, 1952Rose GringerFoldable door supporting clamp
US2637358 *Apr 27, 1948May 5, 1953Larson Charles OSaw horse with a shiftable tool tray
US2644726 *Mar 17, 1950Jul 7, 1953Miller William ECollapsible sawhorse
US2766788 *Mar 23, 1953Oct 16, 1956Robert KahnHinge for pivotally securing legs to folding work benches
US2937675 *Nov 7, 1956May 24, 1960Guzell Walter ASawhorse tool carrier
US3177974 *Aug 31, 1961Apr 13, 1965Easy Horse IncSaw horse
US3233701 *Mar 31, 1964Feb 8, 1966Stanley WorksFoldable leg assembly
US3616873 *Jan 14, 1970Nov 2, 1971Kehrig JohnFoldaway sawhorse
US3631941 *Apr 1, 1970Jan 4, 1972Porta Horse IncCollapsible sawhorse
US4152834 *Oct 13, 1977May 8, 1979Stansberry Robert FSaw horse construction
US4159821 *Mar 28, 1977Jul 3, 1979Inventec International LimitedCollapsible dual-height workbench
US4323226 *Nov 23, 1979Apr 6, 1982Sam CloseClamp assembly
US4330113 *Apr 29, 1980May 18, 1982Hirsh CompanyVise
US4386767 *May 14, 1981Jun 7, 1983Dyckes Dennis BPortable clamping device
US4412668 *Nov 6, 1980Nov 1, 1983S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Apparatus for orienting heavy mold bases
US4489808 *Oct 24, 1983Dec 25, 1984Voye Bradford DCollapsible sawhorse
US5092570 *Feb 19, 1991Mar 3, 1992Depping James WVertical vise with folding sawhorse support
US5275390 *Aug 17, 1992Jan 4, 1994Kimrick, Inc.Lifting and positioning device for cabinets and construction panels
US5289897 *Oct 22, 1992Mar 1, 1994Wiehe Jr William HSawbuck including vierendeel truss construction
US5553838 *Sep 12, 1994Sep 10, 1996Lee Valley Tools Ltd.Clamping bench dog
US5593147 *Sep 25, 1995Jan 14, 1997Read; Kenric W.Free-standing two-way bar clamp
US5645272 *Dec 6, 1994Jul 8, 1997Kimrick, IncorporatedLifting and positioning device for cabinets and construction panels
US5709373 *Dec 4, 1995Jan 20, 1998Wasylynko; David E.Portable ski and snowboard tuning table
US7077368Jun 30, 2004Jul 18, 2006John KarolySpindle support stand
US7270293Mar 21, 2006Sep 18, 2007John KarolySpindle support bracket
US9512627May 10, 2010Dec 6, 2016L. Michael TaronCollapsible saw horse
US20100288585 *May 15, 2009Nov 18, 2010Zag Industries, Ltd.Folding sawhorse
US20110056768 *Aug 25, 2010Mar 10, 2011Budreau Dennis GClydesdale saw horse
US20140232067 *Feb 21, 2013Aug 21, 2014Charles Preston BarryTarget factory
WO2002055270A1 *Jan 10, 2001Jul 18, 2002Darryl Glen HarpleyCollapsible trestle type support structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification182/155, 269/208, 144/286.1, 269/901, 182/129
International ClassificationE04G1/34
Cooperative ClassificationE04G1/34, Y10S269/901
European ClassificationE04G1/34