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Publication numberUS1481339 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 22, 1924
Filing dateApr 3, 1920
Priority dateApr 3, 1920
Publication numberUS 1481339 A, US 1481339A, US-A-1481339, US1481339 A, US1481339A
InventorsBarron Frank William
Original AssigneeBarron Frank William
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Package
US 1481339 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 22 1924.

'- F. W. BARRON EACKAGE Filed April 5. 1920 AE'IDRNEY Patent ed Jan, 22, 1924.

rrEo STATES PATENT err-" ce.

FRANK WILLIAM BARRON, 0F MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA.

, PACKAGE.

Application filed April 8, 1920. semi No. 371,107.

specification.

- This invention relates to the art of packages, and to collapsible containers generally, such as are used as containers for lubricant, paint, printers ink, or other materials of viscuous consistency, as described in the present specification and shown in the accompanying drawings.

The invention conists of the novel features pointed out broadly and specifically .in the claims for novelty following a description containing an explanation in detail of an acceptable form of the invention.

To fully explain the advantages of my invention I shall refer briefly to the construction and adaptability of collapsible containers'in conventional use. Containers such as are employed for holding tooth paste, or analogous toilet preparations of a viscuous consistency, are usually constructed of a soft ductile metal such as tin-foil, and have proven satisfactory in many. ways for this purpose, as'their proportions are small and thecost of production is sufficiently moderate when produced in large quantities. Furthermore, the consistency of the materials contained therein is usually such that little pressure is required to exude the same, and resultant fracturing thereof is seldom experienced.

However, containers of such construction are not adapted for use in vending lubricant, paint, printers ink, and other materials of a relative consistency in marketable quantities, as the cost of production of such is prohibitive incidental to the amount of material required for each container, and the inability of said material to withstand the considerable strain imposed thereon incidental to the great force frequently required to discharge the contents.

The applicant, desirous of obtaining an adequate collapsible container for vending lubricants therein; ensuing a very exhaustive search of the prior art, and a comprehensive acquisition of knowledge in the method and cost of production, found it incumbent to provide such a container, an acceptacle form of which includes a collapsible container formed of a tapered casing made of coated sheet iron, or any inexpensive by-product of sheet metal of a proper gauge having sufficient rigidity, and having a head-casing provided. with a cap, mounted upon the smaller extremity thereof for discharge purposes, and having associated therewith an adjustable impervious fibre liner which accommodates itself to the contour of said cas= mg and prevents expulsion of the contents thereof through any fractures orperforations incident to the discharging operation. The advantages derived from such a construction are many, dependent upon the specific use to which it may be adapted, but a comprehensive elucidation of each is deemed inappropriate for the purpose of this disclosure. Therefore a brief dissertation on the applicability of the invention to the lubricating art is considered sufiicient to point out the objects and desirability thereof.

For the purpose of explanation, the applicant will refer to the method usually employed in lubricating'tractors and farm machinery. For this purpose, grease-guns of well-known types are used, the efficiency of which is not to be herein discussed, but the lubricant with which said grease-guns are charged is in many cases contained in receptacles which are left open and susceptible to accumulation of dust and grit and other foreign matter, which is frequently discharged into the parts requiring lubrication, and

which serve to impair said parts in a very short period of time.

From the viewpoi t of the owner of ma-. chinery, it is desirab e to have the lubricant Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a collapsi ble container as it would appear when filled. Fig. 2 is a similar view showing the lower extremity of the casing open.

Fig. 3 is a side elevation of a collapsible container as it would appear when a quan tity of its contents has been dischar ed.

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of t e liner showing the manner of rolling the same for insertion into the casing.

Fig. 5 is a section taken on the plane indicated by the line 55 in Fig. 3.

General construction.

A very brief description of the head-casing designated in its entirety by the numeral 6 will sufiice, since the particular 'type of such is for the purpose of this disclosure immaterial to the invention which has a wide range of applicability to various kinds of hea -casing.

r In the drawing is illustrated what is known as a head-casin designated by the numeral 6, provided wit the usual discharge opening 7, shown in Fig. 5, through a threaded nipple upon .which the cap 8 is mounted. v

The numeral 9 indicates a tapered metal casing formed from a sheet of coated sheet iron or the equivalent, rolled, and seamed as at lO, to form a frustro-conical shaped casing,-to receive the liner shown in Fig. 4,

which includes a sheet of impregnated paper 11 or an equivalent sheet ofimpervious material, which is rolled in such a manner as to form a frustro-conical-ly shaped liner, the edges 12 and 13 of which overlap. The smaller end of said'liner is inserted in the 0 en end 14 of the casing 9, and the peculiar s ape of said liner efi'ects a very tight binding ofthe over-lappingedges 12 and .13, to

such an extent that the possibility of efiiuence of the material placed therein, which is of a viscuous consistency, is entirely obliterated.

The container is then filled, and isisealed by pressing the lower edges of the casing 9 together and over-lapping the same, as at15. If desired, the liner may extend to the edge therebetween, will serve as a gasket.

' Bearin in mind that the liner 10 may adjust itsel transversally and longitudinally within the casing 9 and conform itself to any deformations of the casin incident to rough handling, the function 0 such be rea ily understood. Assuming that the container is filled, as shown in F g. 1, and it is desired to lubricate a bearing, the cap 8 is unscrewed from the head-casing 7 and the container is connected with the said bearing by a flexible tube or the equivalent. The lubricant contained in the container'is then discharged, by pressing the casing together, as shown in Fig. 3. This may be efi'ected by stepping upon the same, or with the use of a squeezing tool. Having discharged the menses required amount of lubricant, the tube may be unscrewed therefrom, and the cap positioned on the head-casing.

In Fig. 3 the applicant has shown how the lubricant remains in the upper extremity of the container after a quantity has been discharged. This is brought about by the liner 11 which when pressed together will serve as a gasket at the point indicated by the numeral 16, the peculiar action being effected container the edges thereof become fractured and the contents resultantly egressed therethrough. Rough handling of the container by mechanics invariably results in fractures and perforations, and incidentally necessitates the employment of the liner.

In his research, applicant employed a me tallic casing and associated therewith a tubular liner formed of a sheet of impregnated material having fixed over-lapping edges,

In'the discharging of the contents fromthe container, the same frequently expanded and the liner would fracture, resultant of the greatstrain imposed thereupon. v

In employing a cylindrical casing having a liner rolled from a sheet of m regnated material inserted therein, it was ound impossible to maintain an impert ious oint between the over-lap ing edges of the material, and the contents 'equentl caslng.

Ensuing a careful research extending over a period of five years, applicant has found that the construction herein explained ful fills the requirements of a container for the urpose specified, incident to its compact,

desirability and applicabilit of my inven 1 tion, and appreciate that 'vietio'ns from such precise formation and; association of the difi'erent part may be'resorted to-without forming a departure from the spirit of the invention and the scope of the appended claims.

What I claim is:

1. A collapsible container including a casing having a head-casing and a cap, and

an impervious liner within said casin free to adjust itself transversally and longitudiegressed there-' through, and through, ractures in the ed in the Y 1,1,eee

I nally within said casing, and to deformations in the contour thereof.

2. A collapsible container including a casing having a head-casing and a cap, and an impervious liner formed of a sheet of impregnated material positioned within said casing, said liner being free to adjust itself transversally and longitudinally Within said casing, and to deformations in the contour thereof.

3. A collapsible container includinga casing having a head-casing and a cap, and an imperviousliner formed of a sheet of impregnated material frustro-conically rolled, positioned within said casing, said liner being free to adjust itself transversally and longitudinally within said casing, and to deformations in the contour thereof.

4. A collapsible container including a casing having a head-casing and a cap, and an impervious liner within said casing formed of asheet of impregnated material frustro-con-ically rolled and having overlapping edges, said liner being free to adjust itself transversally and longitudinally within said casing the contour thereof. I

5. A collapsible container including a tapered metallic casing having a head-cas ing and a cap, and an impervious liner within said casing free to ad ust itself transversally and longitudinally within said casing, and to deformations in thecontour thereof.

6. A collapsible container including a tapered metallic casing having a head-casing and a cap, and an impervious liner within said casing formed of a sheet of impregnated material frustro-conically rolled prior to insertion, said liner being free to adjust itself transversally and lon itudinally within said casing and to de ormations in the contour thereof.

7. A colla sible container including a. tapered meta ic casing, a head-casing sitioned on the smaller end of said tapered and to deformations in metallic casing, a cap for said head-casing, and an impervious liner withinsaid tapered metallic casing free to adjust itself transversally and lon itudinally within said casing, and to de ormations in the contour thereof.

8. A colla sible container including a tapered meta ic casing, a head-casing positioned on the smaller end of said tapered metallic casing, a cap for said head-casing, and an impervious liner within said tapered metallic casing free to adjust itself transversally and lon itudinally within said casing, and to de ormations in the contour thereof.

9. A collapsible container including a casing having a head-casing and a cap, and

an impervious liner within said casing free to ad ust itself transversally and longitu= dinally within said casing, and to deformations in the contour thereof; said liner serving as a gasket within said casing to prevent return of the contents to the emptied portion of the container after a quantity has een discharged.

10. A collapsible container including a tapered metallic casing formed of a sheet of stiff metal, rolled and over-la ped, the

over-lapping edges being sealed; a ead-casing positioned on the smaller end of the said tapered metallic casing, a ca for said headcasing, and an impervious iner formed .of a sheet of im regnated material frustroconically rolled prion to insertion within said casing, said liner being free to adjust itself transversally and longitudinally within said casing, and to deformations in the contour thereof; and to serve as a gasket with-.

in said casing to prevent return of the contents to the emptied portion of the container after a quantity has been discharged, substantiall as described.

Signe at the city of Montreal, Quebec, Canada, this 25th da of March, 1920.

FRANK 1AM BARRON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2460329 *Mar 25, 1946Feb 1, 1949Disposable Bottle CorpNursing unit
US2686616 *Mar 4, 1950Aug 17, 1954Sidney D BarlowCollapsible tube
US5911344 *Nov 21, 1997Jun 15, 1999Courtaulds Packaging Inc.Rigid thermoplastic squeeze container having self-sealing dispensing valve
US8096448 *Dec 27, 2005Jan 17, 2012Aisapack Holding S.A.Oval cross-section tube, method for the production and device for the use thereof
US8783487 *Dec 28, 2012Jul 22, 2014Masaru HojoSilicone resin container
US8783515Oct 25, 2012Jul 22, 2014Sonoco Development, Inc.Dispenser with fitment
US20130256310 *Dec 28, 2012Oct 3, 2013World Create, Inc.Silicone Resin Container
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/107, 229/942, 222/92
International ClassificationB65D35/14
Cooperative ClassificationY10S229/942, B65D35/14
European ClassificationB65D35/14